Friday, September 25, 2020

Home Food Supplies & Safety
When the Power Goes Out

Food Safety: When the Power Goes Out



Be Prepared
Stock up on non-perishable foods that don't require refrigeration, and choose single-serve sizes if available to avoid the need for refrigeration of unused portions. Consider these easy, healthy, shelf-stable foods: 









Summary

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and ConAgra Foods’ Home Food Safety program is dedicated to raising consumer awareness about the seriousness of foodborne illness and providing solutions for easily and safely handling food in their own kitchens. More information can be found at Home Food Safety


National Menopause Month
How to Avoid Menopausal Weight Gain


Every woman will go through the “change of life,” around 50 years of age plus or minus. This is the time of her last period (or menstruation). Symptoms of menopause vary with every woman. Common symptoms include hot flashes; night sweats; sleep irregularity; mood changes; and possible weight gain around the middle. Some women go through menopause without symptoms.

Due to a decrease in hormone levels and the aging process, many women find themselves gaining weight in their forties and fifties. There is a loss of muscle, which decreases the metabolism; and a gain of fat, mainly in the belly area. Lifestyle factors will play an important role in how you handle menopause. Menopausal women tend to be less active and eat more calories than they need.

Nutrition, Eating and
Wellness Guidelines for Menopause
  1. Maintain a healthy weight; it will decrease your risk of heart disease and other problems. 
  2. Meet your calcium and vitamin D needs. This is important to maintain healthy bones and prevent bone loss that may occur after menopause. Good food sources of calcium include dairy products, such as milk, yogurt and cheese; fortified soy and rice beverages; fortified juices; and canned fish with bones. Good food sources of vitamin D include milk, fortified soy and rice beverages, fortified juices, and fatty fish. 
  3. Be physically active every day. Physical activity helps maintain a healthy weight, keep bones strong and energy levels up, and decrease the risk of heart disease and other age-related complications.
  4. Some women will try soy and flax in food to help relieve the side effects of menopause. Currently, studies have not proven that soy and flax help.
  5. Wear lightweight and layered clothes. Body temperature fluctuates from hot to cold.
  6. Keep a cold glass of water by your side. Due to hot flashes and excessive sweating, it is important to stay hydrated.
  7. Relax.
  8. Take time to laugh.

How to Avoid Menopausal Weight Gain
You don't have to gain weight as a result of menopause.
Elizabeth Somer, RD explains how to avoid weight gain after menopause.

The Menopause Blues



I Will Not Age


Is It Hot In Here, Or Is It Me?


Resources and References

Menopause Awareness Month (MAM), we have a vision that women all over the world will one day be able to embrace menopause rather than suffer from its symptoms.
Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 
Eating Right during Menopause


Family Health and Fitness Day USA



Family Health and Fitness Day USA is a national health and fitness event for families always held the last Saturday in September.  


The event's purpose is to promote the importance of regular physical activity for children and their parents. Families will participate in health promotion events at hundreds of locations throughout the country, including YMCAs and health clubs, park districts, schools, houses of worship and state and local health organizations.



It's Family Time!

You can jump rope, ride bikes, and take a walk as a family. Remember to be safe by using sunscreen, bike helmets, and staying hydrated.

National Fruits and Veggies Month – The ABC’s of Fruits and Vegetables


Fruits and Vegetables Key Consumer Message:

Dietary Recommendations 
for Americans, 2015 - 2020 
Fruits and Vegetables 

There are three reasons to eat the recommended amounts of fruits and vegetables.
1. Most vegetables and fruits contribute a wide variety of nutrients, including folate, magnesium, potassium, dietary fiber, and vitamins A, C, and K. 
2. Consumption of fruits and vegetables is associated with reduced risk of many chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and certain types of cancer.
3. Most fruits and vegetables have no cholesterol and are low in calories and fat. Eating more will help maintain a healthy weight.

From MyPlate.gov
What Foods Are in the Fruit and Vegetable Groups?

Fruits. Any fruit or 100% fruit juice counts as part of the Fruit Group. Fruits may be fresh, canned, frozen, or dried, and may be whole, cut-up, or pureed.

In general, 1 cup of fruit or 100% fruit juice, or ½ cup of dried fruit can be considered as 1 cup from the Fruit Group. The following link lists specific fruits and amounts that count as one cup of fruit (or in some cases equivalents for ½ cup are noted.) MyPlate Fruits. 

VegetablesAny vegetable or 100% vegetable juice counts as a member of the Vegetable Group. Vegetables may be raw or cooked; fresh, frozen, canned, or dried/dehydrated; and may be whole, cut-up, or mashed.  Vegetables are organized into 5 subgroups, based on their nutrient content. Dark-green vegetables; Red and orange vegetables; Beans and peas (legumes); Starchy vegetables; and Others. 

In general, 1 cup of raw or cooked vegetables or vegetable juice, or 2 cups of raw leafy greens is considered as 1 cup from the Vegetable Group. The following link lists specific vegetables and amounts that count as 1 cup of vegetables (or in some cases equivalents for ½ cup are noted).  
MyPlate Vegetables. 



Safety with Fruits and Vegetables
* Rinse and wash fruits and vegetables before preparing or eating them. Under clean, running water, rub fruits and vegetables briskly with your hands to remove dirt and surface microorganisms. Dry with a clean cloth towel or paper towel after rinsing.
* Keep fruits and vegetables separate from raw meat, poultry and seafood while shopping, preparing and storing.




Teaching Kids to Eat Their
Fruits and Vegetables



Healthy Kids PSA: Color of Life


Bring color to your life, and your plate, with nutritious, delicious vegetables.
Visit 
Fruits and Veggies, More Matters
for healthy recipes, menus,
fruit and vegetable nutrition information,
tips on healthy meal planning and
how to get your
kids involved in healthy cooking!




Fruits and Vegetables Song


Resources





National Lobster Day - Nutrition and Recipes



Suggestions on how to Eat Lobster to stay
Healthy and Avoid a Mess (or make a mess)

*No Butter and No Cream
*Ask for Lemon, Olive Oil, and Dijon Mustard
and
 Make Your Own Dressing.
*Wear A Bib


Lobster Facts
From Atlantic Offshore Lobstermen’s Association (AOLA)

The difference between a hard shell and soft shell lobster. 
Lobsters will periodically shed their shells as they grow. This can happen as many as 25 times before they are 6-7 years old; then males shed every year and mature, females every two years. When lobsters become very large molting is less frequent. After they shed they have a paper-thin shell, which can take up to two months to harden and are called soft-shell, new shell, or shedders. The debate goes on as to which is most tasty, though the soft-shell is definitely easier to crack!

Lobsters do not have vocal cords. They do not scream when being cooked.

The teeth of the lobster are in its stomach. The stomach is located a very short distance from the mouth, and the food is actually chewed in the stomach between three grinding surfaces that look like molar surfaces, called the "gastric mill".

Besides the greenish-brown colored lobsters, there are also rare blue, yellow, red and white ones. Except for the white ones, they all turn red when cooked.

A 2-pound female lobster usually carries approximately 8000 eggs. A 9-pound female may carry more than 100,000 eggs. The female carries the eggs inside for 9 to 12 months, and then for another 9 to 12 months externally attached to the swimmerets under her tail.

When the eggs hatch, the larvae will float near the surface for 4 to 6 weeks. The few that survive will settle to the bottom and continue to develop as baby lobsters. From every 50,000 eggs, only 2 lobsters are expected to survive to legal size. It takes 5 to 7 years for a lobster to grow to legal size in the ocean. A lobster at legal size will weigh approximately 1 pound.





Lobster Cooking and Eating




The Lobster and the Beer,
A Story of Survival







Monday, September 21, 2020

International Coastal Cleanup


Ocean Conservancy was founded in 1972, with goals to promote healthy and diverse ocean ecosystems and to oppose practices that threaten oceanic and human life.

Ocean Conservancy believes it's time to look beneath the surface to see where the health of our planet really begins. It’s time to recognize the source that sustains us day to day with the food we eat, the water we drink, and the air we breathe...to discover that all living things are connected to the ocean. It’s time to understand that going green starts with living blue. It’s time to start a sea change.

Mission: Ocean Conservancy promotes healthy and diverse ocean ecosystems and opposes practices that threaten ocean life and human life. Through research, education, and science-based advocacy, Ocean Conservancy informs, inspires, and empowers people to speak and act on behalf of the oceans. In all its work, Ocean Conservancy strives to be the world's foremost advocate for the oceans.


Nearly three-quarters of the Earth's surface is covered by water. The oceans have played a crucial role in the history and sustenance of all life.

The World's Oceans...
* Generates most of the oxygen we breathe
* Helps feed us
* Regulates our climate


It's up to each one of us to help ensure that our ocean is protected and conserved for future generations. Please don't just leave memories of the wonders of the Oceans.

To learn more about the Ocean Conservancy and to get involved, visit:
Website:  
Ocean Conservancy
Twitter: @ourocean

YouTube: Ocean Conservancy
Facebook. Ocean Conservancy

The following videos show the beauty of the oceans, life under the sea, and the effects humans and industry have had on the ocean.

Disney describes the beauty and
the important role 
the ocean plays in our lives.
Oceans - Disney Nature Trailer


The "Little Mermaid Under the Sea"


Thursday, September 17, 2020

From "As Purchased to "Edible Portion": Papaya

Purchasing nutrient analysis software and learning how to use the program is only useful if you have the knowledge to convert “as purchased” ingredients to the “edible portion.” Recipes are usually written based on what the consumer needs to purchase. The individual analyzing the recipe must evaluate the recipe based on the actual food-ready-to-eat (unless the food is meant to be eaten whole.) This book describes how to read a recipe and enter the correct ingredients and amounts, in order to provide an accurate nutrient analysis.






Nutrient Analysis Services 
Ensure accurate nutrient analysis for your recipes utilizing an extensive research database and over 25 years experience. A valuable service for the Recipe Blogger, Media, Cookbook Publishers, Writers, Chefs, and Recipe Websites. Your readers will benefit from the Nutrient information and a Registered Dietitian. Contact: Dietitians-Online.com; Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN, LN, FAND at recipenews@gmail.com

Quiz: Do you have the knowledge and skills necessary to analyze a recipe? 

Below are a series of questions to determine your knowledge of foods and recipes in order to perform a nutrient analysis. The answers can be found at the following link.

1. How much does one cup of cheerios weigh in ounces and grams?

2. How many apples should you purchase to yield 2.75 cups, peeled, cored, and chopped?

3. The recipe states to purchase one pound potatoes. Directions: Bake potatoes and peel. How many ounces will you analyze?

4. How many ounces of lobster would you analyze, if provided with a 1-1/2 pound lobster in a shell?

5. Recipe states to purchase one pound chicken breast with bone and skin. Directions: Broil, remove skin. How many ounces of cooked chicken would you analyze?
6. How many cups of cooked kidney beans would one pound dried kidney beans yield?

7. Recipe states to purchase one pound lean ground beef and broil. Drain fat. How many ounces of cooked ground beef would you analyze?

8. Recipe states to marinade chicken in refrigerator overnight. Prior to cooking, the marinade is drained and discarded. What percentage of the marinade should be included in the analysis?

Follow the link for the answers - Answers to Quiz

September is Hunger Action Month





To learn more how you can help, visit http://hungeractionmonth.org/

The following is a summary of the information found on the Feeding America Website. 

September is Hunger Action Month™, when Feeding America and member food banks ask everyone in America to take action to fight hunger in their community, all month long. Hunger Action Month is your opportunity to join a movement that has a real and lasting impact on our effort to feed more Americans than ever before. Whether it’s by advocating and raising awareness, making donations, or volunteering, you can find the way that’s right for you to make a difference during Hunger Action Month. Together, we can solve hunger.

Feeding America is a nationwide network of 200 food banks and 60,000 food pantries and meal programs that provide food and services to people each year. Together, we are the nation’s leading domestic hunger-relief organization. Our network serves virtually every community in all 50 states, Washington D.C., and Puerto Rico.

The process of getting food to hungry Americans requires a dynamic infrastructure and sophisticated management. Feeding America secures donations from national food and grocery manufacturers, retailers, shippers, packers and growers and from government agencies and other organizations. Feeding America then moves donated food and grocery product to member food banks.

The food banks, in turn, distribute food and grocery items through food pantries and meal programs that serve families, children, seniors, and others at risk of hunger. Last year alone, the Feeding America network distributed more than 3 billion meals to people in need.

Feeding America nationwide network of food banks also supports programs that improve food security among the people we serve; educates the public about the problem of hunger; and advocates for legislation that protects people from going hungry. Individuals, charities, businesses, and government all have a role in ending hunger.

Hunger can affect anyone. Feeding America has identified groups at risk, including young children, hunger in the suburbs, rural hunger, senior hunger, and the working poor.



Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?

Special on Childhood Hunger

Kate is a fictional character who represents the very situation in which many children find themselves when their parents lose their jobs. Find out how you can help this Hunger Action Month http://hungeractionmonth.org/



Childhood hunger hinders a young person's ability to learn. They are more likely to suffer from poverty as an adult. Scientific evidence suggests that hungry children are less likely to become productive citizens. Insufficient nutrition puts children at risk for illness and weakens their immune system. The immature immune systems of young children, ages 0 – 5, make them especially vulnerable to nutritional deprivation and as a result, the ability to learn, grow, and fight infections are adversely affected.


Please find out how you can help during Hunger Action Month http://hungeractionmonth.org/




Wednesday, August 19, 2020

Interaction between Older Adults and Children Benefit Both



The Healthy Aging Partnership offers these suggestions for grandparents and others who want to play a bigger role in young lives:

  • Be yourself. Youngsters will benefit from and enjoy having someone who listens and gives them their undivided attention. All too often parents don't have enough time to spend with their children and that's where you can help. Be a mentor and a friend.
  • Arts and crafts, such as making a scrapbook, create great memories and allow you and a child to learn something new together.
  • Youngsters love to help in the kitchen. The hands-on cooking exercise can be as simple as baking a box cake, with a little measuring and mixing.
  • Gardening is another kid favorite. Dig in the dirt. Plant. Water. Sow fast-sprouting bean, pumpkin or sunflower seeds that grow with every visit.
  • Go to the library. Computers and video games may be a new thing, but you can never go wrong with a great story. Teach them about something you love. If you're excited about it, they will be too.
  • If you don't have grandchildren of your own, volunteer to share an interest or skill with a local youth organization. The American Red Cross, Intergenerational Innovations and Big Brothers, Big Sisters, just to name a few, can help connect older adults with young people in their community.


Edible Flowers by Guest Blogger: Brittaney Bialas, MS, RD


Spring is a warm, bright, and sunny time of year when you may schedule time for outdoor picnics at local parks and beaches. While you are at it, you might as well pencil in some time to brighten up your herb or vegetable garden with some tasty flowers – edible flowers, that is! 

You may have seen floral garnishes adorning fancy meals or flashy desserts; but you may not know that you can eat many of these flowers fresh from the plant after rinsing. Edible flowers can be cooked like a vegetable, sprinkled on top of a favorite dish, used to make soups and sauces, or stuffed and sautéed as a main part of a recipe. They can be made into vinegar, syrups, butters, and jellies, or used in custards, sorbets, and other desserts. They can also be frozen into ice cubes to add extra excitement to an otherwise boring beverage on a hot day. Now is the time of year when many edible flowers are in peak bloom. They may even be in your garden already - just waiting to be added to your next dish!




Some of the edible flowers that may be in your backyard or vases include pansies, violas, chrysanthemums, carnations, fuchsias, geraniums, jasmine, lavender, violets, and certain roses. Flavors range from sweet and honey-like to spicy and peppery, while scents can add a floral aroma or a citrusy tang. Nasturtiums are a popular edible flower that adds a spicy, peppery kick. The purple flowers of banana trees and blossoms of citrus trees (lemon, lime, orange, grapefruit, kumquat) are edible fruit flowers that may be in your back yard. Many herb flowers, including alliums (garlic, chives, leeks), cilantro/coriander, chicory, dill, mint, sage, and thyme are also safe to eat. Most of the flavors of herbal flowers resemble those of the herbs they come from. These can be added to a dish along with or in place of the herb itself. Several vegetable flowers probably already make a regular appearance in your diet, such as cauliflower (who would have thought?), broccoli, and artichoke, which are all flower blossoms. In addition, the flowers of arugula, okra, radishes, peas, and squash are edible. Squash blossoms appear quite often in the produce stands and taste a bit like the raw gourd from which it came.

Best of all, many edible flowers have vitamin C, vitamin A, and other beneficial essential nutrients. Edible flowers can replace sodium and sugar when used in conjunction with herbs and spices, adding more flavor and aroma to foods. However, keep in mind that edible flowers have a delicate taste that is detected best when added to simple dishes that do not have overpowering flavors.





Many flowers can be safely tossed onto our plates; but there are flowers that are poisonous and should never be eaten. Always make sure a flower is edible before adding it to your food. Some resources that list some edible flowers are at Colorado State Extension  and North Carolina State University. In general, edible flowers are best when they are picked during the morning when they have the most moisture. They can be rinsed and placed in a moist paper towel in the refrigerator for storage. Use within a short period to maintain quality.

There are also some safety rules to follow regarding where you find your edible flowers. Do not pick flowers from the side of the road where fumes from vehicles and other contaminants can make the plants unsafe to eat. Do not purchase edible flowers from nurseries or garden centers unless they are grown specifically for consumption. Do consume edible flowers that you have grown from seeds as long as you do not use pesticides or other chemicals. Do introduce small amounts of new flowers one at a time since pollen from the plants may trigger allergies. Do research which parts should and should not be used since each type of edible flower is different.

Flowers are nice to have. Their colors brighten a room, they give off a pleasing aroma, and they bring joy to people who take the time to notice them.

However, one of the most exciting reasons for dietitians to love flowers is that they may be food! Spring is the perfect time to try something new and let an edible flower be a part of your dining room table – and not just as an accent piece in a vase! 


Pansy Herb Salad 
4 cups mixed greens 
1/4 cup fresh sprigs of dill 
1/4 cup fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves 
4 large basil leaves, rolled up and thinly sliced crosswise 
1 large lemon, halved 
Pinch of salt 
Fresh ground black pepper to taste 
1 /2 cup toasted walnuts 
3/4 cup crumbled feta 
1 cup fresh pansy flowers 

Toss salad greens and herbs in a large bowl. Squeeze lemon juice (without the seeds) over the greens and season with salt and pepper. Toss again. Add walnuts and feta and toss well. Divide salad and pansies among four serving plates and serve.

Nutrition Fact Per Serving (Serves 4)
Calories: 179; Fat: 16g; Carbohydrate: 5g. Adapted from Pansy Herb Salad






Saturday, August 8, 2020

International Assistance Dog Week



International Assistance Dog Week was established due to the efforts of Marcie Davis, a paraplegic for over 35 years and CEO of Davis Innovations, a consulting firm based in Santa Fe, NM.


International Assistance Dog Week





      Diabetes alert dog smells blood sugar changes




America's VetDogs CFC


Description of the Various Types of Assistance Dogs

Guide Dogs. Assist people with vision loss, leading these individuals around physical obstacles and to destinations such as seating, crossing streets, entering or exiting doorways, elevators and stairways.

Service Dogs. Assist people with disabilities with walking, balance, dressing, transferring from place to place, retrieving and carrying items, opening doors and drawers, pushing buttons, pulling wheelchairs and aiding with household chores, such as putting in and removing clothes from the washer and dryer.

Hearing Alert Dogs. Alert people with a hearing loss to the presence of specific sounds such as doorbells, telephones, crying babies, sirens, another person, buzzing timers or sensors, knocks at the door or smoke, fire and clock alarms.

Seizure Alert/Seizure Response Dogs. Alert or respond to medical conditions, such as heart attack, stroke, diabetes, epilepsy, panic attack, anxiety attack, post-traumatic stress and seizures.

Medical Alert/Medical Response Dogs. Alert to oncoming medical conditions, such as heart attack, stroke, diabetes, epilepsy, panic attack, anxiety attack, and posttraumatic stress disorder.

Assistance dogs are allowed to accompany their human partners to places of business including restaurants and shops. Under state law and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), they are guaranteed equal access to any and all establishments and accommodations; no extra charge can be levied because of the dog.

Resources.
International Assistance Dog Week (www.assistancedogweek)
Working Like Dogs (
http://www.workinglikedogs.com/)
Assistance Dogs International (http://www.assistancedogsinternational.org/)
International Association of Assistance Dog Partners (http://www.iaadp.org/)

Nutrition.gov News

Dietitian Blog List