Thursday, February 21, 2019

National Nutrition Month,
“Eat Right, Your Way, Every Day”

I enjoy playing with words and seeing if I can come up with a meaningful world that goes with the National Nutrition Month® Theme, “Eat Right, Your Way, Every Day.”

With some juggling and creativity, here is what I came up with.


National Nutrition Month® (NNM) is more than a game; it is a "nutrition education and information campaign created annually by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (Academy). The campaign focuses attention on the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits." 




What does "Eat Right, 
Your Way, Every Day" Mean?








National Nutrition Month
Go Further with Food

National Nutrition Month® 2018 is a nutrition education and information campaign created annually in March by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The campaign focuses attention on the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits.

2018 NNM Theme - "Go Further with Food". The foods you choose can make a real difference. Preparing your foods to go further, by planning meals and snacks in advance can also help to reduce food loss and waste. This year's theme for National Nutrition Month® encourages us to achieve the numerous benefits healthy eating habits offer, but it also urges us to find ways to cut back on food waste. Learning how to manage food resources at home will help you "Go Further with Food" while saving both nutrients and money. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics https://www.eatright.org/



National Nutrition Month, Preview

March is National Nutrition Month® (NNM), a nutrition education and information campaign created annually by the American Dietetic Association (ADA). The campaign focuses attention on the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits. The March 2011 theme for National Nutrition Month® is "Eat Right with Color."




The theme explores the health benefits associated with eating foods of many colors. "Eating a rainbow" refers to including color diversity in your meals and food choices, so as to enhance your intake of a wide range of nutrients. During the month of March, we will explore the colors of foods and their benefits.

Red and Pink Foods
Hosts: Robert (Red) and Pam (Pink)
Apples, Beets, Cayenne, Cherries, Cranberries, Guava, Kidney Beans, Papaya, Pink Beans, Pink/Red Grapefruit, Pomegranates, Radicchio, Radishes, Raspberries, Red Bell Peppers, Red Cabbages, Red Chili Peppers, Red Corn, Red Currants, Red Grapes, Red Onions, Red Pears, Red Peppers, Red Plums, Red Potatoes, Red Tomatoes, Rhubarb, Strawberries, Tomatoes, Watermelons

Green Foods
Host: Grace (Green)
Alfalfa, Artichokes, Arugula, Asparagus, Avocado, Bok Choy, Broccoli, Broccoli rabe, Brussels Sprouts, Celery, Chives, Collard Greens, Cucumbers, Dandelion Greens, Edamame, Endive, Fennel, Green apples, Green Beans, Green cabbage, Green Grapes, Green Olives, Green Onion, Green Pears, Green Peas, Green Pepper, Green Tomatoes, Honeydew, Kale, Kiwi, Leeks, Lettuce, Limes, Mint, Okra, Oregano, Parsley, Pistachios, Snow Peas, Spinach, Sugar snap peas, Swiss Chard, Tarragon, Tomatillo, Wasabi, Watercress, Zucchini

Blue and Purple Foods
Hosts: Brooke (Blue); Betty (Light Blue); and Peggy (Purple)
Blue Grapes, Blue and Purple Potatoes, Blueberries, Dried Plums, Plums, Eggplant, Pomegranates, Elderberries, Juniper Berries, Kelp (Seaweed), Purple Belgian Endive, Purple Cabbage, Purple Figs

Yellow and Orange Foods
Hosts: Yoko (Yellow), York (Yellow) and Oliver (Orange)
Apricots, Bananas, Butternut Squash, Cantaloupe, Carrots, Cheddar Cheese, Citrus Fruits, Clementines, Coriander, Corn, Creamsicle, Dill, Garbanzo Beans, Golden Apples, Golden Flax Seed, Golden Raisins, Grapefruit, Honey, Lemon, Lemongrass, Mandarin Oranges, Mangoes, Nectarines, Orange Jello, Orange Peppers, Orange Tomatoes, Oranges, Papaya, Parsnips, Peaches, Pears, Persimmons, Pineapple, Pumpkin, Rutabagas, Saffron, Salmon, Spaghetti Squash, Squash Blossoms, Sweet Corn, Sweet Potatoes, Tangerines, Whole Grains, Yams, Yellow Apples, Yellow Beans, Yellow Peppers, Yellow Summer Squash, Yellow Wax Beans

White and Black Foods
Hosts: Wendy (White) and Brian (Black)
White: Cauliflower, Coconut, Garlic, Ginger, Green Onions, Scallions, Horseradish, Jicama, Kohlrabi, Leeks, Millet, Mushrooms, Onions, Parsnips, Quinoa, Shallots, Soy Products, Sunflower Seeds, Tofu, Turnips, White Beans, White Corn, White Sesame Seeds

Black: Black Beans, Black Cherries, Black Currants, Black Mushrooms, Black Olives, Black Quinoa, Black Raspberry, Black Rice, Black Sesame Seeds, Black Soybeans, Blackberries, Boysenberries, Prunes, Raisins, Seaweeds, Tamari (Soy Sauce)


My staff and I started the project in September 2010, when ADA announced the theme. Over the next five months, we would take over 600 photographs of colorful foods in order to create the March presentation for NNM. Many of the photographs are available for purchase with the proceeds going to special need young adults. Contact Dr. Sandra Frank for additional information (recipenews@gmail.com).

Sunday, February 10, 2019

National Jell-O Week

February is National Snack Month


 


Week



Jelly or jello comes from gelatin. The Gelatin found in Jell-O comes from the collagen in cow or pig bones, hooves and connective tissues. Gelatin is not recommended for vegetarians. In 1923 D-Zerta became the first sugar-free gelatin dessert.  

Agar or agar-agar is a gelatinous substance derived from agarophyte (red algae). Agar is used as an ingredient in desserts, a vegetarian gelatin substitute, a thickener for soups, in jellies, ice cream and other desserts. Agar-agar is approximately 80% fiber and serves to regulate bowel movements.  

Agar-agar is sold in packages as washed and dried strips or in powdered form. For making jelly, it is boiled in water until the solids dissolve. Sweetener, flavouring, colouring, fruit or vegetables are then added and the liquid is poured into molds to be served as desserts and vegetable aspics, or incorporated with other desserts.  Reference: Wikipedia



Liz Hickok is a San Francisco-based artist known for her work in Jell-O. Her artwork is exhibited across the country and internationally. Hickok’s San Francisco in Jell-O has been covered by The New York Times, Harper’s, Gastronomica, and appeared on the cover of Artweek. Hickok also appeared on the Food Network Awards Show, where she won an award for “Best Use of Food as Art Medium.” Click the link to view Liz Hickok portfolio







As a dietitian, gelatin became known as a stable for clear liquid and full-liquid diets. It is often recommended for vomiting as a means to replace fluid loss and provide calories. The sugar-free gelatin became a favorite for individuals as a "Free Food" on weight-loss programs and diabetic diets. Gelatin is considered a fluid and therefore must be calculated when a patient is placed on a fluid restriction. 


Jell-O Commercial

2010




Links
Jell-O Recipes
7 Wacky Jell-O Molds from Around the World

Nutrition.gov News

Dietitian Blog List