Thursday, May 27, 2021

May 28, National Brisket Day
Brisket on Rye Makeover


After
The original sandwich contained 6-1/2 ounces of brisket. By cutting back the brisket to 2 ounces lean saves 470 calories. Add vegetables to give the sandwich height, fiber and additional nutrients.
Ingredients
2 oz Brisket, lean
2 sl Rye Bread w/seeds
1 Onion, sliced
1/3 Red Pepper, grilled 
1 Romaine Leaves
6 Grape Tomatoes 
1/3 Cucumber, chopped
1 Tbsp Light Vinaigrette


Food Facts
Brisket is a beef cut taken from the breast or lower chest section, behind the foreshank. Brisket is an inexpensive boneless cut. In order to tenderize, the meat requires long, slow cooking to break down the collagen in the connective muscle tissues. 

Methods of Cooking
1. Basting
2. Smoking: Rubbing with a spice rub or marinating, then cooking slowly over indirect heat from charcoal or wood.

Tradition / Culture

Jewish: Braised as a pot roast; or cut for corned beef, which is further spiced and smoked to make pastrami.

Hong Kong: Cooked with spices over low heat until tender, and is commonly served with noodles in soup or curry.

Korean: Traditionally it is first boiled at low temperature with aromatic vegetables, then pressed with a heavy object overnight and served thinly sliced.

Britain: Cooked very slowly in a lidded casserole dish with gravy. The dish, known as a pot roast in the USA but more commonly as braised or stewed beef in the UK, is often accompanied by root vegetables.


Resource
Wikipedia. Brisket
ESHA, Food Processor

World Hunger Day



World Hunger Day is an initiative by The Hunger Project. Started in 2011, it aims to celebrate sustainable solutions to hunger and poverty.

This year, the day will highlight the importance of "fostering self-reliance, upholding principles of human dignity and recognizing that every human is inherently creative, resourceful, responsible and productive. Decades of systematic marginalization have kept people from making lasting changes in their communities.

A holistic development approach — one that includes peacebuilding, social harmony, human rights and good governance — is essential to ensuring the empowerment of people living in hunger and poverty.

More than 815 million people in the world do not have enough food.

Join #WorldHungerDay and make a difference in the poorest communities.


The Hunger Project believes ending hunger is possible when we empower people to become agents of change, lifting themselves - and their communities - out of hunger and poverty for the long term.

May, Older Americans Month
Nutrition and Wellness for Older Adults


Special Message for Older Americans Month 2020
Theme: Make Your Mark!
Remember to #SocialDistance #WearMask #EatRight #StayinTouch 



Every May, the Administration for Community Living leads the nation’s observance of Older Americans Month. The theme for 2020 is ‘Make Your Mark’.

Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, seniors hold a special significance.

In the early ’60s, only 17 million Americans had reached their 65th birthday. Today we have about 52 million older Americans, and that’s according to the 2018 Census data. 

“We need to continue to protect older Americans as they remain the most vulnerable to the ravages of the Coronavirus,” said Dr. Kostelic.

And that doesn’t end when the country begins to reopen. Dr. Kostelic says, “We can’t forget these vulnerable populations and things that we can still do to support them and help inspire them and inspire joy.”

For some ideas on how to ‘Make Your Mark’, click HERE.

Take Care of Those Who Took Care of You



Resources
Administration for Community Living. Older Americans Month


National Sweet Vidalia Onions Month

Vidalia onion is a sweet onion with varieties including the hybrid yellow granex, varieties of granex parentage, and other similar varieties recommended by the Vidalia Onion Committee and approved by the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture.

The onions are named Vidalia because of where they are grown: Vidalia, Georgia. The growing of Vidalia onions there started in the early 1930s. The different varieties are unusually sweet, due to the low amount of sulfur in the soil in which the onions are grown.

The Vidalia onion was named Georgia's official state vegetable in 1990.


Selection

Look for firm onions without decay or blemishes. There should be no sprouts attached and the skins should be dry.

Storage

Store Vidalia onions at room temperature in the legs of clean, sheer pantyhose. Tie a knot between each Vidalia and cut above the knot when ready to use. Hang in a cool, dry, well-ventilated area. On elevated racks or screens, not touching and in a cool place. In the refrigerator, wrap individually in paper towels for up to 6 months. Vidalia onions can also be frozen, either whole or chopped. Frozen onions should be used only for cooking purposes.

Nutrition Profile

Vidalia onions are fat-free, saturated fat-free, cholesterol free, sodium free, a good source of vitamin C and chromium.



Eat More Fruits and Vegetables Day


Fruits and Vegetables Key Consumer Message:

Dietary Recommendations 
for Americans, 2015 - 2020 
Fruits and Vegetables 

There are three reasons to eat the recommended amounts of fruits and vegetables.
1. Most vegetables and fruits contribute a wide variety of nutrients, including folate, magnesium, potassium, dietary fiber, and vitamins A, C, and K. 
2. Consumption of fruits and vegetables is associated with reduced risk of many chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and certain types of cancer.
3. Most fruits and vegetables have no cholesterol and are low in calories and fat. Eating more will help maintain a healthy weight.

From MyPlate.gov
What Foods Are in the Fruit and Vegetable Groups?

Fruits. Any fruit or 100% fruit juice counts as part of the Fruit Group. Fruits may be fresh, canned, frozen, or dried, and may be whole, cut-up, or pureed.

In general, 1 cup of fruit or 100% fruit juice, or ½ cup of dried fruit can be considered as 1 cup from the Fruit Group. The following link lists specific fruits and amounts that count as one cup of fruit (or in some cases equivalents for ½ cup are noted.) MyPlate Fruits. 

VegetablesAny vegetable or 100% vegetable juice counts as a member of the Vegetable Group. Vegetables may be raw or cooked; fresh, frozen, canned, or dried/dehydrated; and may be whole, cut-up, or mashed.  Vegetables are organized into 5 subgroups, based on their nutrient content. Dark-green vegetables; Red and orange vegetables; Beans and peas (legumes); Starchy vegetables; and Others. 

In general, 1 cup of raw or cooked vegetables or vegetable juice, or 2 cups of raw leafy greens is considered as 1 cup from the Vegetable Group. The following link lists specific vegetables and amounts that count as 1 cup of vegetables (or in some cases equivalents for ½ cup are noted).  
MyPlate Vegetables. 



Safety with Fruits and Vegetables
* Rinse and wash fruits and vegetables before preparing or eating them. Under clean, running water, rub fruits and vegetables briskly with your hands to remove dirt and surface microorganisms. Dry with a clean cloth towel or paper towel after rinsing.
* Keep fruits and vegetables separate from raw meat, poultry and seafood while shopping, preparing and storing.




Teaching Kids to Eat Their
Fruits and Vegetables



Healthy Kids PSA: Color of Life


Bring color to your life, and your plate, with nutritious, delicious vegetables.
Visit 
Fruits and Veggies, More Matters
for healthy recipes, menus,
fruit and vegetable nutrition information,
tips on healthy meal planning and
how to get your
kids involved in healthy cooking!




Fruits and Vegetables Song


Resources





Friday, May 21, 2021

National Strawberries and Cream Day

May 21 is designated as National Strawberry and Cream Day. By portion planning, you can turn a desert into a healthy snack.

 Strawberries and Cream with Granola

Ingredients.
1/4 cup Light Strawberry Ice Cream
1 Tablespoon Granola
1/4 cup Strawberries, chopped
1/2 cup Strawberries


Strawberry Parfait with
Frozen Strawberry Yogurt and Granola

Ingredients.
1/3 cup Light Frozen Strawberry Yogurt
2 Tablespoon Granola
1/4 cup Strawberries, chopped
1/2 cup Strawberries
1.5 teaspoons Strawberry Preserves



Nutrition Information. 165 Calories; 3 g Protein; 34 g Carbohydrates; 2 g Dietary Fiber; 3 g Fat (g); 7 mg Cholesterol; 49 mg Vitamin C; 120 mcg Folate; 48 mg Sodium

World Day for Cultural Diversity
Exploring Food Diversity

Today is a beautiful day to celebrate the many cultural foods that makeup American Cuisine. The diversity can be seen as we travel across the country. There are regional differences and the influences of immigrants from all over the world.


New England is known for seafood, particularly lobster and creamy clam chowder. The Southern states are known for collard greens (leafy greens), chicken and dumplings, black-eyed peas, and cornbread. Grits is a popular breakfast dish in the South. The Midwest has traditionally been a beef and grain-producing area, so meats, potatoes, and bread are foods found there. In the Pacific Northwest, fresh salmon is a specialty, and in the Southwest, the Mexican influence can be seen. California and Hawaii are both known for growing many different fruits, and Alaska is known for its fish and King Crab.

As a nation of immigrants, our foods have expanded to include worldwide cuisines, traditions, and religious influences. Many ethnic dishes are joining the American food culture and are seeing an incredible boost in familiarity, approval, and consumption.



Foods from All Over the World

Healthy Choices
Table of Cuisines (from Menu Solutions)

Cuisine
Healthier Choices
Limit
Delicatessen Selections
Extra-lean corned beef, pastrami, or roast beef, beef brisket, and turkey breast are best; whole wheat or multi-grain bread; chicken or tuna salad; chopped herring; chef salad; fresh fruit plate with cottage cheese; dry bagel; borscht or broth soup; tossed salad, sliced tomatoes, beet salad, or carrot raisin salad.
High-fat meats (regular corn beef, hot pastrami, beef bologna, hot dogs, knockwurst, liverwurst, and salami); potato salad; mayonnaise-based salads; combo sandwiches (Reuben); smoked fish (lox); creamy coleslaw; chopped liver; excess cream cheese and cheese spreads; sauerkraut (high in sodium).
Pizza Parlor Selections
You cannot go wrong by ordering extra toppings such as onions, peppers, mushrooms, tomato slices, broccoli, and spinach. Other possibilities include chicken, crab meat, or shrimp.  
Fat starts with the basic cheese, so avoid extra cheese and, in particular, mozzarella. Other culprits include bacon, meatballs, pepperoni, sausage, and prosciutto, as well as anchovies.
Sandwich Shop Selections
Both 100% whole wheat and pita bread are great choices. Good sandwich fillers are grilled chicken breast, ham, roast beef, and turkey breast. Instruct the server not to add butter, margarine, or mayonnaise to the bread and substitute with ketchup, mustard, or horseradish. Good salad choices include chef, garden, or Greek salads, but remember to ask for low-calorie dressings on the side and to omit egg or cheese. Broth-type soups are tasty, such as barley, beef, chicken, lentil, split pea, and vegetable noodles.
Avoid croissants, cheese, excess mayonnaise, egg, and creamy soups. Beware of "diet plates" with big burgers and scoops of cottage cheese, which have loads of saturated fat. Omit cheeseburgers, cheese sandwiches, or grilled cheese "melts" over chicken and seafood salads; and cold cuts. Combo sandwiches with meat and cheese and club sandwiches are best avoided due to the large portion size. Remember that salad combos such as tuna, chicken, and crab meat have lots of mayonnaise. Avoid creamy soups such as chowders or cream of "anything."
Submarine Shop Selections
Order the smaller size roll or pita bread. Turkey, smoked turkey, ham, and roast beef are acceptable. Ask the server to go light on the meats, omit the mayonnaise or oil, and generously load up on the shredded lettuce, onion, peppers, pickles, and sliced tomatoes. Choose salads as alternatives when available, such as chef or tossed salads with perhaps a scoop of tuna, chicken, or seafood served with Italian or pita bread. 
Omit meats such as bologna, Italian cold cuts, salami (hard or Genoa), and sausages. Stay away from cheeses and steak and cheese. Other items to omit include antipasto salads, fried eggplant, and chicken cutlets.
Chinese Selections
Order plain steamed rice; boiled, steamed, or stir-fried vegetables (ask for little oil to be used); moderate fish and shellfish; non-fried tofu; skinless poultry and egg roll (insides only).
Anything fried (rice or crispy noodles), or with sweet and sour sauce; egg dishes or soups; salty soups; avoid duck and limit beef, pork and picked foods; excess soy sauce; ask the chef to leave out MSG and cut down the use of commonly used corn starch, sugar, and salt.
Indian Selections
Order chutney (except mango); curry sauce (yogurt-based); fish (omit butter basting); yogurt with shredded vegetables; basmati rice. Biryani (vegetable dish); chapatti or papadum bread; tandoori chicken; lentil or mulligatawny soups
Creamy or high-salt soups; clarified butter (ghee); deep-fried meats; poori or paratha bread; fried samosa or pakora; ask to prepare dishes without excess salt and to omit coconut milk, if possible; omit garnishes with nuts or dried fruit.
Italian Selections
Order antipasto (no oil or excess meats); crusty bread (no oil or butter); broiled or grilled fish, seafood, chicken, and meats; garlic; plain or vegetable pasta; fresh unsalted mozzarella cheese; steamed leafy vegetables (kale and broccoli); salads; fresh tomatoes; zucchini; ices.
Garlic bread; stuffed pasta (ravioli and lasagna); fried eggplant; meatballs or sausage; sauces with butter, cream, oil, and wine base; pesto sauce; cheese-filled or parmesan style dishes; spumoni or tortoni ice cream. Beware of risotto rice; polenta; and high-fat, high-sodium prosciutto ham and pancetta; veal cutlets and Caesar salads.
Japanese Selections
Order rice; steamed fish; sushi; sashimi; miso soup; raw vegetables; tofu; sukiyaki (stir-fried); yakimono (broiled fish).
Tempura and other deep-fried food; excess peanut and teriyaki sauce; pickled foods; excess salt and sugar in sauces; excess salt in soy marinades and sauces.
Mediterranean (Middle East) Selections
Order couscous, bulgar, and pita bread; legumes such as chickpeas, fava beans, and lentils; hummus; grape leaves; yogurt.
Phyllo dough dishes for sweet desserts such as baklava; feta and kasseri cheese; excess anchovies and olives; high sodium foods; feta, olives, and sausage; appetizers in general, except salads; excess fat from butter, olive oil, omelets, and tahini.
Mexican Selections
Order soft-shell tacos; burritos; fajitas; salsa; chicken enchilada; black beans or Mexican rice; grilled fish or chicken; salads without chips or shells; moderate corn or flour tortilla, using minimal oil; ceviche (marinated fish); gazpacho; chile con carne soup, with no cheese. Acceptable items include shredded lettuce; spicy meats; diced tomatoes; salsa verde; picante or tomato sauce; use Mexican salads as appetizers, with salsa as the dressing.
Chips, nachos; super nachos; chili con queso; fried taco or tortilla shells; guacamole; sour cream; cheese; refried beans; beef and pork dishes; olives; items such as chilies rellenos, chimichangas, chorizo (sausage), and flautas.
Thai Selections
Order steamed rice; broth-based soups (tom yum koang and pok taek); non-fried proteins, such as chicken, seafood, and tofu; vegetables; satay or steamed mussels; salads with light dressings, made with Thai spices.
Excess sodium; soy sauce and sugar; MSG; coconut milk; coconut oil; cream dishes, high milk, and sodium soups; many fried appetizers; curry or curry sauce; fried eggplant; cashew and peanut toppings.

Resources



Wednesday, May 12, 2021

National Osteoporosis Awareness and Prevention Month


May is National Osteoporosis Awareness and Prevention Month. The National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF) is the leading consumer and community-focused health organization dedicated to the prevention of osteoporosis and broken bones, the promotion of strong bones for life and the reduction of human suffering through programs of public and clinician awareness, education, advocacy, and research.

The drastic consequence of osteoporosis is visible in the lives of the millions of sufferers worldwide. Researchers today know a lot about how you can protect your bones throughout your life. Getting enough calcium, vitamin D, and regular exercise is important for your bones.

Feed Your Bones Today

Fact and Fiction about Osteoporosis



What You Need To Know About Milk



Nutrition and Health: Osteoporosis
by The Dairy and Nutrition Council of Indiana and Indiana Dairy Farmers


You’re never too young or too old to improve the health of your bones. Osteoporosis prevention should begin in childhood. But it shouldn’t stop there. Whatever your age, the habits you adopt now can affect your bone health for the rest of your life. Now is the time to take action.

National Mental Health Month
The Relationship Between Nutrition and Depression



Understanding Nutrition, Depression and Mental Illnesses,   T. S. Sathyanarayana Rao, M. R. Asha,1 B. N. Ramesh,2 and K. S. Jagannatha Rao2 (To review the entire article, click the following link.)

Nutrition and food patterns play a key role in the onset, severity, and duration of depression. These may include poor appetite, binge eating, overeating, anorexia, skipping meals, and a desire for sweet foods. Nutritional neuroscience is an emerging discipline shedding light on the fact that nutritional factors are intertwined with human cognition, behavior, and emotions. 

The dietary intake pattern of the different populations throughout the world reflects they are often deficient in many nutrients, such as essential vitamins, minerals, and omega-3 fatty acids. Studies have indicated that daily supplements of vital nutrients are often effective in reducing patients' symptoms. Supplements containing amino acids have also been found to reduce symptoms, as they are converted to neurotransmitters which in turn alleviate depression and other mental health problems. When we take a close look at the diet of depressed people, an interesting observation is that their nutrition is far from adequate. They make poor food choices and selecting foods that might actually contribute to depression

The most common nutritional deficiencies seen in patients with mental disorders are of omega–3 fatty acids, B vitamins, minerals, and amino acids that are precursors to neurotransmitters. Accumulating evidence from demographic studies indicates a link between high fish consumption and low incidence of mental disorders; this lower incidence rate being the direct result of omega–3 fatty acid intake. The majority of Asian diets are usually also lacking in fruits and vegetables, which further leads to mineral and vitamin deficiencies.

Carbohydrates have been found to affect mood and behavior. Eating a meal rich in carbohydrates activates the release of insulin in the body. Insulin helps let blood sugar into cells where it can be used for energy and the production of tryptophan to the brain. Consumption of diets low in carbohydrates tends to generate depression due to the lack of production of serotonin and tryptophan.

Protein intake affects brain functioning and mental health. Many of the neurotransmitters in the brain are made from amino acids. If there is a lack of amino acids, this can associate with low mood and aggression in patients. The excessive buildup of the amino acids phenylalanine may lead to brain damage and mental retardation this disease is called phenylketonuria.



As more resource is collected the relationship between nutrition and depression are unquestionably linked. Mood improvement has been associated with improved vitamin B2 and B6 status. Thiamine is linked to cognitive performance particularly in the older population. Clinical trials have indicated Vitamin B12 may delay the onset of signs of dementia. 

A study observing patients with depression and low blood folate levels has identified a strong predisposing factor of poor outcome with antidepressant therapy. It is not clear yet whether poor nutrition, as a symptom of depression, causes folate deficiency or primary folate deficiency produces depression and its symptoms.


Another relationship between diet and depression involves old age. Related factors include unintentional weight loss; often linked to increased morbidity and premature death; a reduction in taste and smell, poor dentition, the use of medications that may depress the appetite. 


Resources

Mental Health America 500 Montgomery Street, Suite 820 Alexandria, VA. 22314 Phone (703) 684.7722

Call the 24-hour, toll-free confidential National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or go to www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org


National Animal Disaster Preparedness Day



Build a Pet Survival Kit


Food. At least a 3 day supply in an airtight, waterproof container.

Water. At least 3 days of water specifically for your pets.

Medicines and medical records.

Important documents. Registration information, adoption papers, and vaccination documents. Talk to your veterinarian about microchipping and enrolling your pet in a recovery database.

First aid kit. Cotton bandage rolls, bandage tape, and scissors; antibiotic ointment; flea and tick prevention; latex gloves, isopropyl alcohol, and saline solution. Including a pet first aid reference book.

Collar or harness with ID tag, rabies tag, and a leash.

Crate or pet carrier. The carrier should be large enough for your pet to stand, turn around and lie down.

Sanitation. Pet litter and litter box if appropriate, newspapers, paper towels, plastic trash bags, and household chlorine bleach.

A picture of you and your pet together.





National Salsa Month - Spice Up Your Health with Salsa

Salsa is a sauce typical of Mexican cuisine. It is also known as salsa fresca, hot salsa, or salsa picante. Salsa is often tomato-based and includes ingredients such as onions, chilies, and herbs. It is typically spicy, ranging from mild to extremely hot. It is used as dips.

Spice Up Your Health with Salsa

1.  A good source of Vitamin C. Salsa is traditionally made with Vitamin C rich foods such as tomatoes, onion, jalapenos, and lime juice. Vitamin C is important for collagen production, protecting against cell damage, boosting the immune system, fighting infections, and preventing gum disease. 

2.  Promotes a Healthy Heart. As a plant-based food, it's naturally low in cholesterol. Salsa is also an excellent source of potassium, which helps to reduce blood pressure and regulate fluid balance. To get the maximum nutritional benefit, it is best to eat fresh salsa instead of canned alternatives, which can be very high in sodium.

3.  Contains Cancer-Fighting Properties. Most salsas are made with tomatoes and onions - two foods rich in anti-cancer fighting phytochemicals. Tomatoes are an excellent source of lycopene, an antioxidant linked to a decreased risk of prostate, urinary, intestinal and some stomach cancers. Onions are a good source of quercetin another, anti-inflammatory antioxidant. The combination of these ingredients makes salsa a powerful cancer-fighting food!

4. Low in Calories. Salsa is a waist watcher favorite topping. Not only is it low in calories, but it's sure to add flavor and spice to whatever you desire. Two tablespoons of salsa contain less than 15 calories and can be enjoyed liberally on anything from salad to eggs to chicken, and even beans. The possibilities are endless! 


Different Ways to Enjoy Salsa

• Salsa can be made year-round with a variety of fresh fruits or vegetables.
• Turn your abundance of tomatoes into homemade salsa and use your own canning process. 
• Add salsa to eggs or mix in a morning burrito.
• Transform avocado toast into a spiced up version by adding salsa
• Reduce calorie intake by replacing traditional salad dressing or creamy sauces with salsa.
• Spice up dinner by adding salsa to your favorite chicken or fish entrees.
• Add lemon, orange or pineapple juice to a fresh salsa recipe to keep f resh. 
• To maximize the taste and flavor profile, cover and refrigerate for at least one hour before serving.
• Serve safely by not letting the salsa sit at room temperature for more than two hours. And, avoid adding fresh salsa to dip or salsa that has been sitting out.
• Fresh salsa is best if used within three to four days.
• Have fun with your salsa creations! There is no right or wrong way to make salsa, it’s all about mixing fresh ingredients, herbs, and spices and sharing with others


by Mary Claire Britton Cooking Light  


Resources
1. Salsa
Wikipedia®
2. 40+ Fresh Ways to Update Homemade Salsa, CookingLight







Monday, May 10, 2021

Clean Up Your Room Day



I always considered myself an organized person, but sometime in the 1980’s I started saving everything from – old lesson plans; grocery receipts (from recipe testing); scrap papers with numbers (no names); clothes (from size 2 to 24); my son’s artwork; Journals; textbooks, VHS; cassettes; broken phones; wires.. the list is too long to include everything here. 

I started to go through my collection of “stuff” to see what I had and what I no longer needed. I knew this would be a massive undertaking; this was over 30 years of my life collecting dust in boxes, files, drawers, cupboards, closets, the garage and the attic. In just 3 months, I had thrown out over 15 large garbage bags of junk and still did not feel I had made a dent. 

This week, I decided to focus only on one part of the house. I chose my office which is connected to my bedroom. I would not be going through my clothes yet, but it was on the to-do list. I gathered all the boxes from my office, bedroom, under-the-bed, cupboards, shelves, draws, filing cabinets, and the hidden closet. I placed everything in my den to use as my staging area. This was also the only place in my home that still had a record player. I thought while I’m going through this massive amount of paper, I would listen to some of my old favorites before I donated (or threw out) my albums. I have to check to see if they are recyclable.


Who Is NAPO?
The National Association of Professional Organizers (NAPO) is a group of about 4,200 professional organizers dedicated to helping individuals and businesses bring order and efficiency to their lives. Their vision is to have the world recognize the value of organizing and turn to NAPO as the leading organizing authority. Their mission is to develop, lead, and promote professional organizers and the organizing industry. In addition to serving professional organizers, they aim to help consumers and those interested in becoming professional organizers.

Get Rid of Clutter




Benefits of Organization
Organization improves one’s work, life, financial situation, and frees up time and space

10 Benefits of Getting Organized
1. Stress levels will go down and there will be less chaos and more relaxed life.
2. Efficiency gets projects done quicker with less time wasted on looking for things and being able to make quicker decisions.
3. An organized person is able to fit in time for friends, family members, and helping out in the community.
4. Getting organized helps you feel better about your environment and you are more likely to invite people into your environment without embarrassment.
5. You'll be a better role model for your children.
6. Get organized and you'll have more than enough time to exercise and cook healthy meals for yourself and your family.
7. An organized environment also tends to be a much cleaner environment.
8. An organized person gives a much better business impression than someone who can't find a phone number, has an office piled with cardboard boxes or is always late for appointments.
9. When you're organized, you'll always know what you have, before you buy more.
10. Organized people find ways to eliminate tasks that aren't necessary and to streamline those that are taking too much time. This leaves plenty of time to work on achieving your goals. 


“Organization brings a level of peace and tranquility to your life,” says Jennifer Snyder of Neat as a Pin! Organizing Experts. Snyder also advises people not to keep things around “just in case.” 


“Clutter makes noise, it makes energetic noise. It sucks your energy from you.” Clutter also attracts dust and pests. “Clutter is basically sending a message there’s something in your life that you need to get at. 


Snyder organizes for no more than four hours at a time, to give her clients time to adjust to the improvements. “It didn’t get that way overnight. It’s a lifestyle change. You’re changing the way you think about things and becoming more emotionally healthy,” she said. 


What to do with castoffs. Once space is organized, there will be bags of items to discard. Itemized list of donations to receive tax deductions, and discarding things properly, such as erasing computer hard drives before dropping them off at a donation center.




Being better organized can provide energy, time 
and happiness. 


Get the Children Involved


Resources:
National Association of Professional Organizers 

WebMD. 10 Ways to Cut Clutter in Your Home 


A Final Message.



I read that one should take a photo of your child's art work and then the boxes of school work can be thrown away. I had one problem - my son. As I was admiring the years of his efforts, he came by to see how I was doing. With a look of shock and horror - Jake told me how could I throw away his work? "I made it for you, mom."

So here is the photo. I ended up keeping his cherished work. I guess I'm not ready to get rid of everything yet.









Dietitian Blog List