Tuesday, September 24, 2019

All About Whole Grains Month


Stop by the
Whole Grains Council to learn more about whole grains and try some new recipes.
Identifying Whole Grains


There are three different varieties of the Whole Grain Stamp: the 100% Stamp, the 50%+ Stamp, and the Basic Stamp.

  • If a product bears the 100% Stamp (left image above), then all its grain ingredients are whole grain. There is a minimum requirement of 16g (16 grams) – a full serving – of whole grain per labeled serving, for products using the 100% Stamp.
  • If a product bears the 50%+ Stamp (middle image), then at least half of its grain ingredients are whole grain. There is a minimum requirement of 8g (8 grams) – a half serving – of whole grain per labeled serving, for products using the 50%+ Stamp. The 50%+ Stamp was added to the Whole Grain Stamps in January of 2017, and will begin appearing on products in the spring and summer of 2017.
  • If a product bears the Basic Stamp (right image), it contains at least 8g (8 grams) – a half serving – of whole grain, but may also contain some refined grain.

Examples of Whole Grains

Read the label and look for the following
whole grains as the first ingredient:

Amaranth 
Barley 
Brown Rice 
Buckwheat
Bulgur (Cracked Wheat)
Corn (Polenta, Tortillas, Whole Grain Corn/Corn Meal) 
Farro 
Kamut® 
Millet 
Oats, Whole Oats, Oatmeal 
Quinoa 
Rye, Whole Rye 
Sorghum 
Spelt 
Teff 
Triticale Wild Rice
Whole Wheat Flour


Recipe: Quinoa Stuffed Acorn Squash





Monday, September 16, 2019

Sneak Preview: 2020 National Nutrition Month - Eat Right, Bite by Bite!




The theme chosen by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics for National Nutrition Month 2020 is Eat Right, Bite by Bite! 

I am a National Nutrition Month fan. This year’s theme provides numerous opportunities to teach nutrition for all ages. From our children's first bite, picky eaters, teen and adult choices, cultural influences, disability feeding, and aging. 

"The theme’s rhyme and simple food treatment not only appeals to kids and kids-at-heart but “bite by bite” also supports the philosophy that every little bit (or bite!) of nutrition is a step in the right direction. Small goals/changes can have a cumulative healthful effect. Nutrition doesn't have to be overwhelming.

Most importantly, Eat Right, Bite by Bite is fun, positive, kid-friendly, inclusive of and adaptable for all eating patterns and cultures, and accessible and easy to understand."


Resources and materials will be available in early 2020 at https://sm.eatright.org/NNMinfo.  

Friday, September 13, 2019

A Dietitian’s Perception of Food Styling

This photograph took 18 hours and 215 shots. Many times it takes longer, and sometimes I know after a few hours I’ve caught what I am looking for. 




Food Styling
Most food stylists have a background in the culinary arts, many are professional chefs. They have knowledge of nutrition, cooking techniques, and food science. The role of the food stylist is to make the food look attractive in the finished photograph. 

I’m a different type of food stylist. My experience comes from nutrition, dietetics, food science, recipe development, gardening, and portion control. The biggest difference is portion control and I enjoy working with only fruits, vegetables, grains, and dairy. 


My goal is to create and illustrate wonderful and appetizing foods using portion control. I want those who view the photographs to experience a feeling of satiety. 


The Process

I start with a sketch, which includes a grocery list. However, I do leave myself open for specials, sales, and the unusual.

I prepare 3 identical dishes. (One for Jake; the second is the one I play and create with, and the third is called the "Hero" - to be used in the final picture.

I have numerous locations I like to photograph from (inside and outside). 


The Den is my studio with extra lights, umbrellas, reflectors, etc.. I use stone, wood or tile tables. Also, the fireplace creates a nice backdrop. 

I'm a collector of cloth napkins, baskets and bottles; and I use them in my photographs. Below are some of the different areas I photograph in the den and in dining room.



Inside: Kitchen table; Kitchen window; Kitchen Chair; Food Prep Counter.


Outside: I have a collection of large logs I’ve arranged throughout my yard. Depending on the time of day, I will use them as a stand or background. I also love to use my garden as a background, the food tastes better. 

Plates/Accessories. I usually stay with basic colors, so as not to distract from the food, since I like working with foods of many colors. To decorate the image, I like using napkins, herbs, fruits, vegetables, baskets, parchment paper, etc. 


I sometimes wonder if we took the same amount of care and preparation creating a meal or dessert from fruits, vegetables or whole grains; rather than a high calorie, high sugar, and high-fat pastry would we make the same choices. 


This is a book, I have found very useful, "Food Styling, the art of preparing food for the camera." The author, Delores Custer is passionate about her work and it shows.



Saturday, September 7, 2019

National Tailgating Day - Food Safety Advice from the USDA

Tailgate Parties Food Safety Advice From USDA




A tailgate party is a social event held on and around the open tailgate of a vehicle. Tailgating, which originated in the United States, often involves consuming alcoholic beverages and grilling food. Tailgate parties occur in the parking lots at stadiums and arenas, before and occasionally after games and concerts. People attending such a party are said to be 'tailgating'. Many people participate even if their vehicles do not have tailgates. Tailgate parties also involve people bringing their own alcoholic beverages, barbecues, food etc. which is sampled and shared among fans attending the tailgate. Tailgates are intended to be non-commercial events, so selling items to the fans is frowned upon.


Tailgate parties have spread to the pre-game festivities at sporting events besides football, such as basketball, hockey, soccer, and baseball, and also occur at non-sporting events such as weddings, barbecues, and concerts

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