Saturday, February 13, 2016

National Jell-O Week
February 7 - 13, 2016

February is National Snack Month


 


Week



Jelly or jello comes from gelatin. The Gelatin found in Jell-O comes from the collagen in cow or pig bones, hooves and connective tissues. Gelatin is not recommended for vegetarians. In 1923 D-Zerta became the first sugar-free gelatin dessert.  

Agar or agar-agar is a gelatinous substance derived from agarophyte (red algae). Agar is used as an ingredient in desserts, a vegetarian gelatin substitute, a thickener for soups, in jellies, ice cream and other desserts. Agar-agar is approximately 80% fiber and serves to regulate bowel movements.  

Agar-agar is sold in packages as washed and dried strips or in powdered form. For making jelly, it is boiled in water until the solids dissolve. Sweetener, flavouring, colouring, fruit or vegetables are then added and the liquid is poured into molds to be served as desserts and vegetable aspics, or incorporated with other desserts.  Reference: Wikipedia


Liz Hickok is a San Francisco-based artist known for her work in Jell-O. Her artwork is exhibited across the country and internationally. Hickok’s San Francisco in Jell-O has been covered by The New York Times, Harper’s, Gastronomica, and appeared on the cover of Artweek. Hickok also appeared on the Food Network Awards Show, where she won an award for “Best Use of Food as Art Medium.” Click the link to view Liz Hickok portfolio




As a dietitian, gelatin became known as a stable for clear liquid and full-liquid diets. It is often recommended for vomiting as a means to replace fluid loss and provide calories. The sugar-free gelatin became a favorite for individuals as a "Free Food" on weight-loss programs and diabetic diets. Gelatin is considered a fluid and therefore must be calculated when a patient is placed on a fluid restriction. 


Jell-O Commercial

2010




Links
Jell-O Recipes
7 Wacky Jell-O Molds from Around the World
Gelatin gets the jiggle back on

Friday, February 12, 2016

Abraham Lincoln’s Favorite Foods and Dietary Habits

Abraham Lincoln was born on February 12, 1809. He served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. The photos of Abraham Lincoln show a man who was tall and slender.

What did he eat while he led the country through the American Civil War,  ending slavery and promoting economic modernization?


Helen Dupre Bullock, Historian of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, wrote "Authorities agree that Lincoln was indifferent to food, not particularly knowing or caring what was placed before him, whether it was cold or hot, and even whether he ate it or not. If not reminded of meal times he forgot them." Lincoln was usually so preoccupied with problems of politics he gave little thought to food unless faced with it.

In the White House, President Lincoln’s eating habits were irregular. For breakfast, he would have an egg, a piece of toast and coffee, if he remembered to eat. Lunch consisted of “a biscuit, a glass of milk in winter, some fruit or grapes in summer,” wrote John Hay, an aide to President Lincoln. “He drank nothing but water, not from principle, but because he did not like wine or spirits.

President Lincoln was fond of certain foods, especially apples, and Mrs. Lincoln always had plenty of apples available. One of his favorite meals was fresh fruit and nuts, cheese and crackers. Some sources note, President Lincoln did have two favorite dishes, Chicken Fricassee with Biscuits and Oyster Stew. His favorite dessert was Apple Pie.

References

Lincoln's Table
, by Donna D. McCreary, contains 125 recipes of foods the Lincolns enjoyed, including flannel cakes (pancakes) and corn bread. The book provides stories about Abraham Lincoln's childhood and background information about many ingredients used in the recipes, as well as photos and menus. The recipes, though historically authentic, have been converted to modern-day measurements.




Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address

Happy Valentine's Day with the Healthy Heart Collection

Collection of heart shaped and heart healthy foods with
special valentine messages for a heart healthy life.




Wishing you love, laughter, health and friendship.



Thursday, February 11, 2016

February 11, National Shut-In Visitation Day
Your Visit Can Make a Big Difference


People who are shut-in may be lonely, have difficulty going to the market, 
cooking meals and/or eating. 

Your visit can make a big difference.

Most recently with Hurricane Sandy and the unpredictable weather conditions; we became aware of a large number of disabled and elderly people trapped in their homes and apartments (some trapped over 16 stories high.)

How you can help.



Stories from the Heart







If you are interested in helping there are numerous programs available, such as:

Meals-on-Wheels Programs (check your local listing)
Big Brothers and Big Sisters Program
Check local religious organization.


Wednesday, February 10, 2016

February 7-13 Feeding Tube Awareness Week
Meet People Leading Active Lives







The overall objective of Feeding Tube Awareness Week is to help raise awareness of enteral/tube feeding as a positive and often life-saving medical intervention for those who are unable to eat and drink enough on their own to sustain life and thrive (and in the case of children, grow and develop).

Moreover,
Feeding Tube Awareness Foundation hopes to break down the social stigma that is currently attached to tube feeding by:

  • Highlighting the positive outcomes associated with tube feeding
  • Giving more information about the reasons people require tube feeding
  • Countering stereotypes and misinformation about tube feeding


Feeding Tube Awareness Foundation is raising awareness of tube feeding through Feeding Tube Awareness Week


Living with a Feeding Tube, Feeding Tube Awareness Week 2016, The Oley Foundation
.


Tube Feeding Program at
 Medical Service Company


How Do G-Tubes Work?


Tuesday, February 9, 2016

February 9, 2016 Mardi Gras

Mardi Gras - a celebration including masks, costumes, parades and rich foods.

Light version of sausage gumbo with added okra and corn
Per serving: 168 calories; 6 g fat (2 g sat, 1 g mono); 25 mg cholesterol; 18 g carbohydrates; 11 g protein; 3 g fiber; 631 mg sodium; 448 mg potassium.


February 9, National Bagel and Lox Day
Bagel Terminology and Nutrition Information


General Bagel Rules

*1 ounce of a bagel equals 80 calories (most bagels weigh about 3 ounces).
*Scooped, when the inside of the bagel is removed (Saves about 40 to 80 calories). 
*Smear equals about one to two tablespoons of cream cheese.


Joy Bauer, RD takes us through the bagel's history from its start in the royal palace of Poland, to the streets of Manhattan's Lower East Side to the plates of millions of Americans. Find out what's in a bagel and how you can enjoy the bagel without the guilt.







Meal Planning

Dietitian Blog List