Tuesday, August 31, 2021

August 31, National Trail Mix Day
The Food Label Detective:
Emerald Trail Mix


*FDA 21 CFR 101.9 Nutrition labeling of food. FDA regulation allows manufacturers to round a number of servings to the nearest 0.5 serving, as long as they use the term “about”. Serving size is based on RACC = Reference Amount Customarily Consumed per Eating Occasion.


One Serving Size: 1oz (28g)
130 calories per Servings
Package Size: Net Wt. 2.25 oz (63.8g)
About 2 Servings per package

Findings
Actual Serving per Package = 2.3
299 Calories per Package

Read the Label; an Educated Consumer has the knowledge

to make the Best Choices.

Monday, August 30, 2021

August, National Sandwich Month - Use Your Creativity

August is National Sandwich Month. The sandwich was named after John Montagu, the fourth Earl of Sandwich. During the 1700s, it is said John Montagu created the sandwich because he wanted to eat his meal with one hand.





Resource: Build a Better Sandwich, @produceforkids 

Greatest Movie Sandwiches



Sunday, August 29, 2021

August 29, More Herbs, Less Salt Day and
National Lemon Juice Day

Instead of salt, use spices, herbs, lemon juice,
and/or vinegar to 
enhance the taste of your food.
The health benefits are life-long.



Wikipedia has provided an extensive list of culinary herbs and spices. The list does not contain salt (which is a mineral) or plants used primarily as herbal teas or medicinal herbs. Explore the different flavors and cultures.

Tips for Selecting and Storing
Herbs and Spices


Spice it Up with
Susan Bowerman, MS, RD, CSSD


Where does sodium come from?
Sodium comes from natural sources or is added to foods. Most foods in their natural state contain some sodium. However, the majority of sodium Americans consume comes from sodium added to processed foods by manufacturers. While some of this sodium is added to foods for safety reasons, the amount of salt added to processed foods is above what is required for the safety and function of the food supply.

Reading Labels
When you buy prepared and packaged foods, read the labels. You can tell the sodium content by looking at the Nutrition Facts panel of a food. Listed are the amount for sodium, in milligrams (mg), and the “% Daily Value.” Also read the ingredient list to watch for the words "soda" (referring to sodium bicarbonate, or baking soda), "sodium" and the symbol "Na" to see if the product contains sodium.

Salt and/or Sodium Descriptors

  • Salt-Free:  Meets requirements for "sodium-free."
  • Sodium Free: Fewer than 5 milligrams sodium per serving.
  • Very Low Sodium:  35 milligrams or less sodium per serving.
  • Low Sodium: 140 milligrams or less per serving 
  • Reduced Sodium:  At least 25 percent less sodium per serving.
  • Unsalted:  Has no salt added during processing. To use this term, the product it resembles must normally be processed with salt and the label must note that the food is not a sodium-free food if it does not meet the requirements for "sodium-free".

The FDA and USDA state an individual food that has the claim "healthy" must not exceed 480 mg sodium per reference amount. "Meal type" products must not exceed 600 mg sodium per labeled serving size.


Sodium and Hypertension.
In order for a food to make an Allowable Health Claim, it must contain a defined amount of nutrients. In relationship to sodium and Hypertension, the amount is 140 milligrams or less sodium per serving.

American Heart Association (AHA)
The American Heart Association recommends you choose and prepare foods with little or no salt to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. Aim to eat less than 1,500 mg of sodium per day (less than 3/4 teaspoon of salt).
The AHA is working with federal agencies to identify ways to reduce the amount of sodium in the food supply. The association is encouraging food manufacturers and restaurants to reduce the amount of sodium in foods by 50 percent over a 10-year period. AHA will help Americans lower the amount of sodium they consume by the following strategies:
 1. Reduce the amount of sodium in the food supply,
 2. Make more healthy foods available (e.g., more fruits and vegetables); and
 3. Provide consumers with education and decision-making tools to make better choices.


 
Tips for reducing sodium in the diet
 1.  Choose fresh, frozen or canned food items without added salts.
 2.  Select unsalted nuts or seeds, dried beans, peas, and lentils.
 3.  Limit salty snacks like chips and pretzels.
 4.  Avoid adding salt and canned vegetables to homemade dishes.
 5.  Select unsalted, lower sodium, fat-free broths, bouillons or soups.
 6.  Select fat-free or low-fat milk, low-sodium, low-fat cheeses, and low-fat yogurt.
 7.  Use spices and herbs to enhance the taste of your food. 
 8.  Add fresh lemon juice instead of salt to fish and vegetables.
 9.  When dining out, ask for your dish to be prepared without salt.
10. Don’t use the salt shaker.






Thursday, August 26, 2021

National Water Quality Month - How much do kids Need?





When the water in our rivers, lakes, and oceans becomes polluted, the effects can be far-reaching. It can endanger wildlife, make our drinking water unsafe, and threaten the waters where we swim and fish.


The Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) is the federal law that protects public drinking water supplies throughout the nation. Under the SDWA, the 
US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sets standards for drinking water quality and with its partners implements various technical and financial programs to ensure drinking water safety.




The mission of EPA is to protect human health and the environment. EPA's purpose is to ensure that: all Americans are protected from significant risks to human health and the environment where they live, learn and work; national efforts to reduce environmental risk are based on the best available scientific information; federal laws protecting human health and the environment are enforced fairly and effectively; environmental protection is an integral consideration in U.S. policies concerning natural resources, human health, economic growth, energy, transportation, agriculture, industry, and international trade, and these factors are similarly considered in establishing environmental policy; all parts of society - communities, individuals, businesses, and state, local and tribal governments - have access to accurate information sufficient to effectively participate in managing human health and environmental risks; environmental protection contributes to making our communities and ecosystems diverse, sustainable and economically productive; and the United States plays a leadership role in working with other nations to protect the global environment. So what happened in Flint, Michigan and are other communities are at risk?



Drinking Water in your Home
Many people choose to filter or test the drinking water that comes out of their tap or from their private well for a variety of reasons. And whether at home, at work or while traveling, many Americans drink bottled water.





Wednesday, August 25, 2021

Kids Eat Right Month - The Kid Friendly Kitchen


Help your kids start young and master simple cooking tasks before moving on to more complex skills. Use these age-appropriate ideas to keep your kids excited, safe and well-educated in the kitchen! To learn more, visit Kids Eat Right at Kid-Friendly Kitchen Tasks Infographic


 



Back to School Nutrition
Resource Guide
Kids Eat Right Month

All over the country, children and parents are getting ready for the new school year to begin. With so much information about food and nutrition available on the Internet and in the news, Dietitians-Online has prepared the Back to School Nutrition Resource Guide.





Resources
Organizations, Associations, and Programs
School Nutrition Experts

Graphics
Lunchbox Safety
Planning School Meals Using MyPlate


Resources
Organizations, Associations, and Programs
Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is your source for trustworthy, science-based food and nutrition information. The worlds largest organization of food and nutrition professionals, the Academy is committed to improving the nation's health and advancing the profession of dietetics through research, education, and advocacy.

Kids Eat Right your source for scientifically-based health and nutrition information you can trust to help your child grow healthy. As a parent or caretaker, you need reliable resources and you can find them here, backed by the expertise of nutrition professionals.
Home Food Safety Tips The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and ConAgra Foods public awareness campaign, Home Food Safety, is dedicated to providing home food safety statistics, information about foodborne illness and safe food handling information and tips.
Choose MyPlate. The website features practical information and tips to help Americans build healthier diets.
Vegetarian Resource Group
Vegetarian Kids, Teens, and Family
Action for Healthy Kids believes there are ways to reduce and prevent childhood obesity and undernourishment. Learn how Action for Healthy Kids is working with schools, families and communities to help our kids learn to be healthier and be ready to learn.
Healthy Children The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and its member pediatricians dedicate their efforts and resources to the health, safety and well-being of infants, children, adolescents and young adults.
Healthy Children - Nutrition
Food Allergies in Children


Team Nutrition Campaign launched by USDA's Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) to encourage and teach children, parents, and caregivers to eat healthy and be physically active every day. Eat Smart. Play Hard.™ is about making America's children healthier. It's about practical suggestions that will help you motivate children and their caregivers  to eat healthy and be active. Eat  smart. Play Hard.™ Campaign messages and materials are fun for children and informative for caregivers. 

 
We Can
The We Can! GO, SLOW, and WHOA Foods fact sheet (pdf) can be posted on the refrigerator or used when grocery shopping.
The We Can! Parent Tips - Snack (pdf) 100 Calories or Less tip sheet can help consumers choose vegetables, whole grains, and fat-free or low-fat (1 percent) milk for healthier snacks.
  Fruits and Veggies More Matters
Gearing Up for Back to School
National Dairy Council® (NDC)



 Fuel Up To Play 60 sponsored by National Dairy Council and the National Football League, in collaboration with United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Fuel Up to Play 60 is an in-school program that encourages the availability and consumption of nutrient-rich foods, along with at least 60 minutes of daily physical activity.
The National School Lunch Program (NSLP) is a federally assisted meal program operating in public and nonprofit private schools and residential childcare institutions. It provides nutritionally balanced, low-cost or free lunches to children each school day. The program was established under the National School Lunch Act, signed by President Harry Truman in 1946.

The School Breakfast Program (SBP) provides cash assistance to  States to operate nonprofit breakfast programs in schools and residential childcare institutions. The program is administered at the Federal level by FNS. State education agencies administer the SBP at the State level, and local school food authorities operate it in schools.



School Nutrition Experts

Dayle Hayes, MS, RD
School Meals That Rock (Facebook)
Dayle Hayes is an award-winning Registered Dietitian, author, and educator. Dayle developed a program for parents, FIT KIDS = HAPPY KIDS; created 5 A Day BINGO, and produced several videos. As a parent and member of the School Nutrition Association, Dayle is dedicated to improving school environments. She collected success stories for Making It Happen; wrote a chapter on communicating with students in Managing Child Nutrition Programs: Leadership for Excellence; and developed Enriching Family Mealtimes, a kit for school leaders and educators. In 2008, she co-authored the Position of the American Dietetic Association: Nutrition Guidance for Healthy Children Ages 2 to 11 Years.

Caroline, RD at Giant Eagle® 
Pack an A+ Lunch for School


Lunchbox Safety
















Kids Eat Right Month - Best Picks in a Vending Machine


August is Kids Eat Right Month, a new nutrition education, information sharing and action campaign created by Kids Eat Right, an initiative of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and its Foundation.

August 27, Banana Lovers Day: Nutrition, Selection, Storage, and Recipes



Selection
Choose bananas that are firm and free of bruises. Bananas are best to eat when the skin color is solid yellow and speckled with brown. Bananas with green tips or with practically no yellow color have not developed their full flavor. Bananas are overripe when they have a strong odor.


Storage
To ripen bananas leave at room temperature for a couple of days. Once ripe store in the refrigerator for 3 to 5 days. The peel may turn brown in the refrigerator, but the fruit will not change.


Recipes
If you love bananas, Eating Well has a collection of Banana Recipes you are sure to enjoy.


Chiquita Banana The Original Commercial 
Produced by Disney Studios in the 40's, this commercial appeared only in movie theaters, and for over 50 years kept us humming its catchy tune.


DOLE Banana Growing and Planting
Dole explains the growing and planting of bananas.


Banana Farm
The banana farm at EARTH University uses socially and environmentally responsible practices at every stage of the process. The farm plants trees along river banks to promote biodiversity and reduce harmful erosion. In addition, they do not use herbicides. The farm's eco-friendly practices produce some of the most flavorful bananas in the world.

Portion Control Matters - Kids Eat Right



Resources
1. WebMD, Portion Size Guide
2. Kids and Portion Control, Jo Ellen Shield, RDN, Kids Eat Right
3. 
How to Avoid Portion Size Pitfalls to Help Manage Your Weight, CDC
4. 
What is the difference between a serving and a portion? NIH




 

 

National Dog Day
Health Benefits





Health Benefits of a Pet



Studies have found that:
• Pet owners are less likely to suffer from depression than those without pets.
• People with pets have lower blood pressure in stressful situations than those without pets.
• Playing with a pet can elevate levels of serotonin and dopamine, which calm and relax.
• Pet owners have lower triglyceride and cholesterol levels than those without pets.
• Heart attack patients with pets survive longer than those without.
• Pet owners over age 65 make 30 percent fewer visits to their doctors than those without pets.

Caring for a pet can help with those healthy lifestyle changes by:
• Increasing exercise. Exercise doesn’t have to involve boring repetition at a gym. Taking a dog for a walk, riding a horse, or simply chasing a kitten around are fun ways to fit healthy daily exercise into your schedule.
• Providing companionship. Isolation and loneliness can make disorders such as depression even worse. Caring for a living animal can help make you feel needed and wanted, and take the focus away from your problems. Most pet owners talk to their pets, some even use them to work through their troubles.
• Helping meet new people. Pets can be a great social lubricant for their owners. Dog owners frequently stop and talk to each other on walks or in a dog park. Pet owners also meet new people in pet stores, clubs, and training classes.
• Reducing anxiety. The companionship of a dog can offer comfort, help ease anxiety, and build self-confidence for people anxious about going out into the world.
• Adding structure and routine to your day. Many pets, especially dogs, require a regular feeding and exercise schedule. No matter your mood—depressed, anxious, or stressed—you’ll always have to get out of bed to feed, exercise, and care for your pet.
• Providing sensory stress relief. Touch and movement are two healthy ways to quickly manage stress. This could involve petting a cat or taking a dog for a walk.

Pets and older adults
The key to aging well is to effectively handle life’s major changes, such as retirement, the loss of loved ones, and the physical changes of aging. Pets can play an important role in healthy aging by:
• Helping you find meaning and joy in life. As you age, you’ll lose things that previously occupied your time and gave your life purpose. You may retire from your career or your children may move far away. Caring for a pet can bring pleasure and help boost your morale and optimism. Taking care of an animal can also provide a sense of self-worth.
• Staying connected. Maintaining a social network isn’t always easy as you grow older. Retirement, illness, death, and moves can take away close friends and family members. And making new friends can get harder. Dogs especially are a great way for seniors to spark up conversations and meet new people.
• Boosting vitality. You can overcome many of the physical challenges associated with aging by taking good care of yourself. Pets encourage playfulness, laughter, and exercise, which can help boost your immune system and increase your energy.

Resources and References

American Humane Association
5 Ways Pets Can Improve Your Health

August 25, National Banana Split Day - Fruit Festival




Ingredients
1 Banana, split in half
1 Kiwifruit, peeled and sliced
4 Strawberries, sliced
1/4 cup Cherries, sliced
1/2 cup Orange Segments
1/2 cup Low Fat Ice Cream, optional









Monday, August 23, 2021

From Our Garden:
Pasta, Mango and Green Bell Pepper with Ginger Thyme Dressing

Recipe: Pasta, Mango and Green Bell Pepper  
with a Ginger Dressing 

The last mango of the season. The tree produced 82 mangoes this year. We met our neighbors who came by to pick fruit from the tree. We made 6 Banana Mango Breads and 60 Muffins. Family and friends enjoyed these sweet and juicy mangoes. 


With this last mango, I wanted to make something different. There were two bell peppers ready for picking. What would blend well with this combination?

        •     Pasta - hot or cold
        •     Thyme from the garden
        •     Ginger dressing






From Our Garden:
Pasta, Mango and Green Bell Pepper with
Ginger Thyme Dressing
Serves 3

Ingredients
3 cup Pasta, cooked
3/4 cup Mango, diced
1/2 cup Green Bell Pepper, sliced

Ginger-Thyme Dressing (Serving size: 2 Tablespoon)
1/4 cup rice vinegar
2 tsp sesame oil
1 tablespoon soy sauce, low sodium
1.5 tablespoon grated ginger root
1 teaspoon brown sugar
3/4 teaspoon finely chopped fresh thyme
1/4 teaspoon finely chopped garlic
1/8 tsp white pepper

Directions
  1. Prepare pasta, mango, and peppers. Place in a bowl. Cover and refrigerate.
  2. Dressing. Whisk together all ingredients in a small bowl. Drizzle over pasta. 
  3. Serve Hot or Cold.

Nutrition Facts

Ginger Thyme Dressing

Serving size. 2 Tbsp

Calories (kcal)             37
Protein (g)                   1
Carbohydrates (g)       2
Total Dietary Fiber (g) 0
Total Sugars (g)          1
Added Sugar (g)         1
Fat (g)                         3
Saturated Fat (g)        0
Cholesterol (mg)         0
Sodium (mg)              193

Nutrition Facts
Serving size.
1.25 cup Pasta, Mango and Green Bell Pepper with
2 Tbsp Ginger Thyme Dressing 

Calories (kcal)             249
Protein (g)                   8
Carbohydrates (g)       46
Total Dietary Fiber (g)  7
Total Sugars (g)           8
Added Sugar (g)          1
Fat (g)                          5
Saturated Fat (g)         0
Cholesterol (mg)          0
Sodium (mg)              199

Choosing foods from your garden makes the meal special and tastes better.  




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