Saturday, June 19, 2021

A Special Father's Day Gift to Show You Care

A Gift from the Heart for the Heart



A Special Father's Day Gift to Show You Care
"Health is the Greatest Gift and Happiness the Greatest Wealth"
1. Print the card and cut along the grey outer border.
2. Fold the card in half. It's about the size of a business card.
3. Place wallet size photos on the blank side of the card.

4. Optional Gifts to place inside:
    
Lottery Ticket, Dinner at his Favorite Restaurant, a
Day at the Beach,
    Voucher to Wash His Car,
 Family Picnic, Tickets to a Sporting Event,

    Time Together

Your father will carry around photos of loved ones with health reminders.
A perfect gift for a Special Father.
Sample Outside

Checklist to Stay Healthy







Friday, June 18, 2021

June 18, International Picnic Day and Food Safety



June 18 is International Picnic Day; an informal food holiday. The day is celebrated where food is brought from home or a market and eaten outdoors. 

The origin of picnic day dates back to medieval times. After a successful hunt, people would gather outside for a picnic. It is possible International Picnic Day was developed and promoted to bring families together for outside activities, family reunions, exercise, relaxation, and an appreciation of nature.


Traditional foods served on International Picnic Day include such dishes as salads, sandwiches, beverages, and desserts. If a grill is available, include cooked meats, fish, poultry, and vegetables. 





*Pack beverages in one cooler and perishable foods in another.
*Limit the number of times the cooler is opened so as to keep the contents cold longer.

*Be sure to keep raw meat, poultry, and seafood securely wrapped. This keeps their juices from contaminating prepared and cooked foods or foods that will be eaten raw, such as fruits and vegetables.
*Rinse fresh fruits and vegetables under running tap water before packing them in the cooler.
*Keep food properly chilled in a cooler and don’t let food sit out for more than two hours (one hour if the temperature is 90º F or higher).



Thursday, June 17, 2021

June 18, International Sushi Day
Sushi Safety






Sushi is rich in omega-3s and healthy fatty acids. There are several different types of sushi: 

Nigiri Sushi. Mounds of sticky rice are wrapped or layered with seafood and other ingredients

Maki Sushi. Sticky rice and other ingredients are rolled into a cylinder, using thin sheets of dried seaweed.

Sashimi. Sliced raw fish, served with a variety of condiments.

Condiments for Sushi
Soy sauce. Many people blend some of the wasabi with soy sauce to make a tasty dipping sauce for their sushi.

Wasabi. Japanese horseradish, and it's HOT; comes as a powder that you make into a thick, bright green paste by adding liquid

Pickled Ginger. Used to help cleanse the palate and offer relief from the hot wasabi.


Sushi Safety


How safe is the raw fish in sushi? 

Commercial freezing for at least 72 hours at 4 degrees Fahrenheit kills the parasitic worms and their larvae. Note, home freezers usually cannot reach temperatures this low. 

Precautions: 

• Order sushi from reputable restaurants, where the restaurant and fish provider follow food safety standards. 
• Eating fish cooked completely is always the safest. 
• The FDA recommends pregnant or individuals with compromised immune systems (young children, the elderly, and persons with chronic illness) should not risk eating raw fish. 
• Never make your own sushi with raw fish unless you can freeze the fish for more than 72 hours at 4 degrees Fahrenheit. Instead, use cooked fish or vegetables. 
 Proper handling and preparation are crucial to ensure the safety of sushi made with raw fish. 
•  After purchasing raw seafood, fish, and sushi rice; refrigerate immediately below 41ºF until ready to serve. 
•  Preparing rice with vinegar lowers the pH and helps slow the rate of bacterial growth. 
•  Once sushi rolls and sashimi are prepared, refrigerate immediately until serving. 
•  Cross-contamination is a concern since sushi is made with both raw and cooked fish. To prevent cross-contamination, raw and cooked fish must be physically separated during preparation. Use different utensils, cutting boards, and surfaces.

World Day to Combat Desertification and Drought

World Day to Combat Desertification and Drought
 “Let’s Grow the Future Together”

Our land. Our home. Our future. 

Desertification is the degradation of land in arid, semi-arid and dry sub-humid areas. It is caused primarily by human activities and climatic variations. It occurs because dryland ecosystems, which cover over one-third of the world‘s land area, are extremely vulnerable to over-exploitation and inappropriate land use. Poverty, political instability, deforestation, overgrazing, and bad irrigation practices can all undermine the productivity of the land.
Over 250 million people are directly affected by desertification, and about one billion people in over one hundred countries are at risk. These people include many of the world‘s poorest, most marginalized, and politically weak citizens.

The World Day to Combat Desertification and Drought is observed every year to promote public awareness of international efforts to combat desertification. The day is a unique moment to remind everyone of land degradation neutrality is achievable through problem-solving, strong community involvement, and cooperation at all levels
.


“Land Degradation and Migration”

The World Day to Combat Desertification and Drought examines the important link between land degradation and migration. Among others, environmental degradation, food insecurity, and poverty are causes of migration and development challenges.   
In just 15 years, the number of international migrants worldwide has risen from 173 million in 2000 to 244 million in 2015.

2021 Theme: 
Restoration. Land. Recovery.

The 2021 Desertification and Drought Day will focus on turning degraded land into healthy land. Restoring degraded land brings economic resilience, creates jobs, raises incomes, and increases food security. It helps biodiversity to recover. It locks away the atmospheric carbon warming the Earth, slowing climate change. It can also lessen the impacts of climate change and underpin a green recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic.

Nearly three-quarters of the Earth’s ice-free land has been altered by humans to meet an ever-growing demand for food, raw materials, highways, and homes. Avoiding, slowing, and reversing the loss of productive land and natural ecosystems now is both urgent and important for a swift recovery from the pandemic and for guaranteeing the long-term survival of people and the planet.


What do we envisage in a world where land degradation neutrality provides a solid basis for poverty reduction, food, water security as well as climate change mitigation and adaptation?

 Goals
The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development declares that “we are determined to protect the planet from degradation, including through sustainable consumption and production, sustainably managing its natural resources and taking urgent action on climate change, so that it can support the needs of the present and future generations”. Specifically, Goal 15 states our resolve to halt and reverse land degradation.




June 17, Eat Your Vegetables Day and
June, Fresh Fruits and Vegetables Month

June 17, Eat Your Vegetables Day



Key Consumer Message:

Dietary Recommendations 
for Americans, 2015 - 2020 
Fruits and Vegetables 

There are three reasons to eat the recommended amounts of fruits and vegetables.
1. Most vegetables and fruits contribute a wide variety of nutrients, including folate, magnesium, potassium, dietary fiber, and vitamins A, C, and K. 
2. Consumption of fruits and vegetables is associated with reduced risk of many chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and certain types of cancer.
3. Most fruits and vegetables have no cholesterol and are low in calories and fat. Eating more will help maintain a healthy weight.

From MyPlate.gov
What Foods Are in the Fruit and Vegetable Groups?

Fruits. Any fruit or 100% fruit juice counts as part of the Fruit Group. Fruits may be fresh, canned, frozen, or dried, and may be whole, cut-up, or pureed.

In general, 1 cup of fruit or 100% fruit juice, or ½ cup of dried fruit can be considered as 1 cup from the Fruit Group. The following link lists specific fruits and amounts that count as one cup of fruit (or in some cases equivalents
for ½ cup are noted.)
 

VegetablesAny vegetable or 100% vegetable juice counts as a member of the Vegetable Group. Vegetables may be raw or cooked; fresh, frozen, canned, or dried/dehydrated; and may be whole, cut-up, or mashed.  Vegetables are organized into 5 subgroups, based on their nutrient content. Dark-green vegetables; Red and orange vegetables; Beans and peas (legumes); Starchy vegetables; and Others. 

In general, 1 cup of raw or cooked vegetables or vegetable juice, or 2 cups of raw leafy greens is considered as 1 cup from the Vegetable Group. The following link lists specific vegetables and amounts that count as 1 cup of vegetables (or in some cases equivalents for ½ cup are noted). 



How many fruits and vegetables 
are needed daily?

Safety with Fruits and Vegetables
* Rinse and wash fruits and vegetables before preparing or eating them. Under clean, running water, rub fruits and vegetables briskly with your hands to remove dirt and surface microorganisms. Dry with a clean cloth towel or paper towel after rinsing.
* Keep fruits and vegetables separate from raw meat, poultry and seafood while shopping, preparing, and storing.




Teaching Kids to Eat Their
Fruits and Vegetables



Healthy Kids PSA: Color of Life


Bring color to your life, and your plate,
with nutritious, delicious vegetables.
Visit
Fruits and Veggies, More Matters for healthy recipes, menus, fruit and vegetable nutrition
information, tips on healthy meal planning
and how to get your kids involved in healthy cooking!




Fruits and Vegetables Song


Resources

Monday, June 14, 2021

June 15, National Lobster Day - Nutrition and Recipes



Suggestions on how to Eat Lobster to stay
Healthy and Avoid a Mess (or make a mess)

*No Butter and No Cream
*Ask for Lemon, Olive Oil, and Dijon Mustard
and
 Make Your Own Dressing.
*Wear A Bib


Lobster Facts
From Atlantic Offshore Lobstermen’s Association (AOLA)

The difference between a hard shell and soft shell lobster. 
Lobsters will periodically shed their shells as they grow. This can happen as many as 25 times before they are 6-7 years old; then males shed every year and mature, females every two years. When lobsters become very large molting is less frequent. After they shed they have a paper-thin shell, which can take up to two months to harden and are called soft-shell, new shell, or shedders. The debate goes on as to which is most tasty, though the soft-shell is definitely easier to crack!

Lobsters do not have vocal cords. They do not scream when being cooked.

The teeth of the lobster are in its stomach. The stomach is located a very short distance from the mouth, and the food is actually chewed in the stomach between three grinding surfaces that look like molar surfaces, called the "gastric mill".

Besides the greenish-brown colored lobsters, there are also rare blue, yellow, red and white ones. Except for the white ones, they all turn red when cooked.

A 2-pound female lobster usually carries approximately 8000 eggs. A 9-pound female may carry more than 100,000 eggs. The female carries the eggs inside for 9 to 12 months, and then for another 9 to 12 months externally attached to the swimmerets under her tail.

When the eggs hatch, the larvae will float near the surface for 4 to 6 weeks. The few that survive will settle to the bottom and continue to develop as baby lobsters. From every 50,000 eggs, only 2 lobsters are expected to survive to legal size. It takes 5 to 7 years for a lobster to grow to legal size in the ocean. A lobster at legal size will weigh approximately 1 pound.







Lobster Cooking and Eating




The Lobster and the Beer,
A Story of Survival





Sunday, June 13, 2021

During Mens Health Month, Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Reminds Men To Eat Right For Every Decade Of Life


CHICAGO – Gentlemen, do you think your nutrition needs stay the same your whole adult life? Every decade has its own health concerns, from weight creep to heart disease, all which change the types and amounts of food you need to eat during each life stage. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics encourages men to take time during Men’s Health Month to ensure they have developed a healthful eating plan that is most appropriate and beneficial for their age.

“Each life stage has its own nutritional requirements to keep your body running in peak form,” says registered dietitian nutritionist and Academy Spokesperson Jim White. “Eating right at every age will help you sail through the decades feeling great.”

The Academy and its expert registered dietitian nutritionists offer tips to help men understand which foods will help boost their health at every decade of life.




20s: High Energy
“A higher metabolism and an active lifestyle can help younger men maintain a better weight, even if their diet isn’t stellar,” White says. “Eating foods like nuts, seeds, and dried fruit instead of snacks like chips, soda, and candy can satisfy your hunger and give a nutrient boost at the same time.”

Active guys need to be sure they're getting enough protein. Choose a variety of foods like seafood, lean meat and poultry, eggs, beans and peas, soy products, and unsalted nuts and seeds. “Heart-healthy fatty fish like salmon, tuna, and mackerel can reduce the risk of developing heart disease, too,” White says.

30s: Weight Doesn't Wait
“While your appetite may stay the same in your 30s as in your 20s, your lifestyle has likely slowed a little due to marriage, kids and jobs. So now is the time to change to a more regular eating pattern,” White says.

Eating smaller, more regular and more frequent meals throughout the day will help you keep from getting too hungry and then overeating at a meal later in the day. “Plan healthy meals and snacks for your day, whether you’re at work or at home,” White says.

40s: Feed the Heart and Bones
As men age, the risk of heart disease becomes greater, and your 40s are the time to put more focus on heart health. “Fiber, especially soluble fiber found in peas, beans, oats, apples, and citrus fruit, can help keep your heart healthy because it works like a sponge to soak up cholesterol,” says registered dietitian nutritionist and Academy Spokesperson Ximena Jimenez.

Now is also a good time to reinforce strong teeth and bones. “Calcium from low-fat or fat-free dairy, dark green leafy vegetables or tofu, and vitamin D from fortified foods like milk and cereal are two of the best nutrients for your bones and teeth,” Jimenez says.

50s: Busting Disease
As certain diseases like cancer, especially prostate cancer, become more likely in the 50s and beyond, including plenty of antioxidants in your diet is key, like those found in berries and colorful vegetables.
While lycopene, vitamin E, and selenium are marketed to men as tools to reduce the chance of developing prostate cancer, there is no definitive science to back up these claims. “Whether there is a direct correlation between prostate cancer and these minerals or not, an overall healthy diet should contain both selenium and lycopene,” White says.

60s and Beyond: Maintain the Muscle
In your 60s and beyond, men start losing muscle mass, so protein is important. Replace protein foods that are higher in solid fats with choices that are lower in solid fats and calories or are sources of oils, such as salmon and tuna. “Also look at beans and peas. Because of their high nutrient content, they are considered both a vegetable and protein food,” White says.

For more information on men’s health, visit Healthy Eating for Men.

All registered dietitians are nutritionists – but not all nutritionists are registered dietitians. The Academy’s Board of Directors and Commission on Dietetic Registration have determined that those who hold the credential registered dietitian (RD) may optionally use “registered dietitian nutritionist” (RDN) instead. The two credentials have identical meanings.

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is the world’s largest organization of food and nutrition professionals. The Academy is committed to improving the nation’s health and advancing the profession of dietetics through research, education, and advocacy. Visit the Academy at www.eatright.org

Resources
Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Men's Health
US Department of Health and Human Services: Men's Health



National Men's Health Week





Men's Health Week.com  is maintained by Men's Health Network. Men's Health Network (MHN), is a non-profit educational organization focused on improving the health and well-being of men, boys, and their families through a broad spectrum of national screening, educational campaigns, advocacy opportunities, and patient navigation.

MHN can be found in every state and over 25 foreign countries. The advisory board consists of over 800 physicians, researchers, public health workers, and community leaders specializing in men's and family health.




Preventative Care

When you get a preventive medical test, you’re not just doing it for yourself. You’re doing it for your family and loved ones:
  • Men are 24 percent less likely than women to have visited a doctor within the past year and are 22 percent more likely to have neglected their cholesterol tests.
  • Men are 28 percent more likely than women to be hospitalized for congestive heart failure.
  • Men are 32 percent more likely than women to be hospitalized for long-term complications of diabetes and are more than twice as likely than women to have a leg or foot amputated due to complications related to diabetes.
  • Men are 24 percent more likely than women to be hospitalized for pneumonia that could have been prevented by getting an immunization.
The single most important way you can take care of yourself and those you love is to actively take part in your health care. Educate yourself on health care and participate in decisions with your doctor. This site will help you get started.
Source: Healthcare Cost & Utilization Project and Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data


Men's Health Week

The purpose of Men's Health Week is to heighten the awareness of preventable health problems and encourage early detection and treatment of disease among men and boys.

This week gives health care providers, public policymakers, the media, and individuals an opportunity to encourage men and boys to seek regular medical advice and early treatment for disease and injury.

The Goals of Men’s Health Network
1. Save men's lives by reducing premature mortality of men and boys.
2. Foster health care education and services that encourage men of all ages to implement positive lifestyles for themselves and their families.
3. Increase the physical and mental health of men so that they can live fuller and happier lives.
4. Energize government involvement in men's health activities so that existing government health networks can be utilized to increase the health and well-being of men and boys.

Men: Stay Healthy at Any Age Your Checklist for Health (pdf file)
The information in this fact sheet is based on research findings from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF). The USPSTF is the leading independent panel of experts in prevention and primary care. The Task Force, which is supported by AHRQ, conducts rigorous, impartial assessments of the scientific evidence for the effectiveness of a broad range of clinical preventive services, including screening, counseling, and preventive medications. Its recommendations are considered the gold standard for clinical preventive services.

 Tips for men to get/stay healthy.

Resources
  1. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Men's Health
  2. US Department of Health and Human Services: Men's Health
  3. Men's Health Network (MHN)
  4. Get it Checked (pdf)
  5. International Men's Health Week
  6. During Men’s Health Month, Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Reminds Men To Eat Right




June 14, Flag Day History and Snacks




Dessert Pizza with
Brie, Blueberries, and Strawberries


Yield: 3 servings
Serving Size: 1/3 crust

Ingredients
1 Pizza Crust, (7-inches)
1.5 oz Brie6 Strawberries
1/3 cup Blueberries





Nutrition Information




Blueberries, Watermelon, and Part-Skim Mozzarella








June 13, Kitchen Klutzes of America Day
National Safety Month
Create a Safe Kitchen

Kitchen safety involves avoiding and looking for potential hazards. Focus your attention on four main areas.
  • Fire and Electrical Hazards
  • Food Preparation
  • Food Safety and Cleanliness
  • Create a Child-Friendly Kitchen

Fire and Electrical Hazards
 1. Use a 3-prong grounded connection on all appliances.
 2. Do not use extension cords.
 3. Discard any broken or damaged appliances.
 4. Turn off burners immediately when not in use.
 5. Keep dish towels, pot holders, and paper towels away from the stove or other hot areas where they can catch fire.
 6. Do not leave candles burning unattended. Place in flameproof containers.
 7. Keep a fire extinguisher in or near the kitchen, but away from the stove or other hot areas.
 8. Keep lighters and matches away from the reach of children.

Kitchen Safety - Fire Hazards


Food Preparation
 1. Turn the handles of cooking pots and pans away from the front of the stove.
 2. Be careful when removing the lid from hot foods. The heat can burn you.
 3. Never leave cooking foods unattended!!
 4. Close cabinet doors and draws when not in use.
 5. Make sure appliances with sharp areas are unplugged before touching them.
 6. Use proper lifting techniques when carrying heavy items.
 7. Knives - Always cut away from the body when using a knife. Cut using a proper cutting surface. Keep knives clean. Do not leave knives soaking in water. When cleaning the blade, keep the sharp edge away from hands.

Kitchen Safety: Knife Safety

Food Safety and Cleanliness
There are ways to avoid food poisoning and accidents by proper handling of foods and keeping yourself and your work area clean.
 1. Clean up spills immediately.
 2. Always wash your hands before working in the kitchen. Wash with soap and water for 20 seconds before and after handling food.
 3. Wash kitchen surfaces often, and wash platters before refilling them with fresh food. 
 4. Keep uncooked and ready-to-eat foods separate. Juices from raw meat may cross-contaminate other food if they contain harmful bacteria. 
 5. Use one cutting board for raw meat and poultry and another one for vegetables. If you use only one cutting board, wash it with hot soapy water after preparing each food item.
 6. Use a food thermometer to be sure foods are cooked safely. Steaks should be cooked to 145 °F, ground beef cooked to 160 °F, and all poultry cooked to 165 °F.
 7. Never hold hot or cold foods for more than two hours at room temperature, or between 40 °F and 140 °F. Refrigerate or freeze leftovers promptly.
 8. When in doubt, throw it out; do not eat it.

Food Safety


Cooking and spending time in the kitchen is fun for kids, and also provides parents with an opportunity to teach children. Here are tips to create a kid-friendly kitchen:











Multicultural American Child Awareness Day

Today is a wonderful day to celebrate the many cultural foods that make up the American Cuisine. The diversity can be seen as we travel across the country. There are regional differences and the influences of immigrants from all over the world.






New England is known for seafood, particularly lobster, and creamy clam chowder. The Southern states are known for collard greens (leafy greens), chicken and dumplings, black-eyed peas, and cornbread. Grits is a popular breakfast dish in the South. The Midwest has traditionally been a beef and grain-producing area so meats, potatoes, and breads are foods found there. In the Pacific Northwest fresh salmon is a specialty and in the Southwest, the Mexican influence can be seen. California and Hawaii are both known for growing many different fruits, and Alaska is known for its fish and King Crab.





As a nation of immigrants, our foods have expanded to include worldwide cuisines, traditions, and religious influences. Many ethnic dishes are joining the American food culture and are seeing an incredible boost in familiarity, approval, and consumption.





Foods from All Over the World




Healthy Choices
Table of Cuisines (from Menu Solutions)


Cuisine
Healthier Choices
Limit
Delicatessen Selections
Extra-lean corned beef, pastrami, or roast beef, beef brisket, and turkey breast are best; whole wheat or multi-grain breads; chicken or tuna salad; chopped herring; chef salad; fresh fruit plate with cottage cheese; dry bagel; borscht or broth soup; tossed salad, sliced tomatoes, beet salad, or carrot raisin salad.
High-fat meats (regular corn beef, hot pastrami, beef bologna, hot dogs, knockwurst, liverwurst, and salami); potato salad; mayonnaise-based salads; combo sandwiches (Reuben); smoked fish (lox); creamy coleslaw; chopped liver; excess cream cheese and cheese spreads; sauerkraut (high in sodium).
Pizza Parlor Selections
You cannot go wrong by ordering extra toppings such as onions, peppers, mushrooms, tomato slices, broccoli, and spinach. Other possibilities include chicken, crab meat, or shrimp.  
Fat starts with the basic cheese, so avoid extra cheese and in particular mozzarella. Other culprits include bacon, meatballs, pepperoni, sausage, and prosciutto, as well as anchovies.
Sandwich Shop Selections
Both 100% whole wheat and pita bread are great choices. Good sandwich fillers are grilled chicken breast, ham, roast beef, and turkey breast. Instruct the server not to add butter, margarine, or mayonnaise to the bread and substitute with ketchup, mustard, or horseradish. Good salad choices include chef, garden, or Greek salads, but remember to ask for low-calorie dressings on the side and to omit egg or cheese. Broth-type soups are good, such as barley, beef, chicken, lentil, split pea, and vegetable noodle.
Avoid croissants, cheese, excess mayonnaise, egg, and creamy soups. Beware of "diet plates" with big burgers and scoops of cottage cheese, which have loads of saturated fat. Omit cheeseburgers, cheese sandwiches, or grilled cheese "melts" over chicken and seafood salads; and cold cuts. Combo sandwiches with meat and cheese and club sandwiches are best avoided due to the large portion size. Remember that salad combos such as tuna, chicken, and crab meat have lots of mayonnaise. Avoid creamy soups such as chowders or cream of "anything."
Submarine Shop Selections
Order the smaller size roll or pita bread. Turkey, smoked turkey, ham, and roast beef are acceptable. Ask the server to go light on the meats, omit the mayonnaise or oil, and generously load up on the shredded lettuce, onion, peppers, pickles, and sliced tomatoes. Choose salads as alternatives when available, such as chef or tossed salads with perhaps a scoop of tuna, chicken, or seafood served with Italian or pita bread. 
Omit meats such as bologna, Italian cold cuts, salami (hard or Genoa), and sausages. Stay away from cheeses and steak and cheese. Other items to omit include antipasto salads, fried eggplant, and chicken cutlets.
Chinese Selections
Order plain steamed rice; boiled, steamed, or stir-fried vegetables (ask for little oil to be used); moderate fish and shellfish; non-fried tofu; skinless poultry and egg roll (insides only).
Anything fried (rice or crispy noodles), or with sweet and sour sauce; egg dishes or soups; salty soups; avoid duck and limit beef, pork and pickled foods; excess soy sauce; ask chef to leave out MSG and cut down the use of commonly used corn starch, sugar, and salt.
Indian Selections
Order chutney (except mango); curry sauce (yogurt-based); fish (omit butter basting); yogurt with shredded vegetables; basmati rice. Biryani (vegetable dish); chapatti or papadum bread; tandoori chicken; lentil or mulligatawny soups
Creamy or high-salt soups; clarified butter (ghee); deep-fried meats; poori or paratha bread; fried samosa or pakora; ask to prepare dishes without excess salt and to omit coconut milk, if possible; omit garnishes with nuts or dried fruit.
Italian Selections
Order antipasto (no oil or excess meats); crusty bread (no oil or butter); broiled or grilled fish, seafood, chicken, and meats; garlic; plain or vegetable pasta; fresh unsalted mozzarella cheese; steamed leafy vegetables (kale and broccoli); salads; fresh tomatoes; zucchini; ices.
Garlic bread; stuffed pasta (ravioli and lasagna); fried eggplant; meatballs or sausage; sauces with butter, cream, oil, and wine base; pesto sauce; cheese-filled or parmesan style dishes; spumoni or tortoni ice cream. Beware of risotto rice; polenta; and high-fat, high-sodium prosciutto ham and pancetta; veal cutlets and Caesar salads.
Japanese Selections
Order rice; steamed fish; sushi; sashimi; miso soup; raw vegetables; tofu; sukiyaki (stir-fried); yakimono (broiled fish).
Tempura and other deep-fried food; excess peanut and teriyaki sauce; pickled foods; excess salt and sugar in sauces; excess salt in soy marinades and sauces.
Mediterranean (Middle East) Selections
Order couscous, bulgar, and pita bread; legumes such as chickpeas, fava beans, and lentils; hummus; grape leaves; yogurt.
Phyllo dough dishes for sweet desserts such as baklava; feta and kasseri cheese; excess anchovies and olives; high sodium foods; feta, olives, and sausage; appetizers in general, except salads; excess fat from butter, olive oil, omelets, and tahini.
Mexican Selections
Order soft-shell tacos; burritos; fajitas; salsa; chicken enchilada; black beans or Mexican rice; grilled fish or chicken; salads without chips or shells; moderate corn or flour tortilla, using minimal oil; ceviche (marinated fish); gazpacho; chile con carne soup, with no cheese. Acceptable items include shredded lettuce; spicy meats; diced tomatoes; salsa verde; picante or tomato sauce; use Mexican salads as appetizers, with salsa as the dressing.
Chips, nachos; super nachos; chili con queso; fried taco or tortilla shells; guacamole; sour cream; cheese; refried beans; beef and pork dishes; olives; items such as chilies rellenos, chimichangas, chorizo (sausage), and flautas.
Thai Selections
Order steamed rice; broth-based soups (tom yum koang and pok taek); non-fried proteins, such as chicken, seafood, and tofu; vegetables; satay or steamed mussels; salads with light dressings, made with Thai spices.
Excess sodium; soy sauce and sugar; MSG; coconut milk, coconut oil; cream dishes, high milk, and sodium soups; many fried appetizers; curry or curry sauce; fried eggplant; cashew and peanut toppings.

Resources
1. Multicultural American Child Awareness Day


Nutrition.gov News

Dietitian Blog List