Thursday, July 18, 2019

Take the Food Color Challenge
Rich in Beautiful Colors and Endless Possibilities
National Nutrition Month


The Food Color Challenge celebrates the 2011 American Dietetic Association National Nutrition Month (NNM) theme, "Eat Right with Color." Angela Lemond, a registered and licensed dietitian (AKA “Mommy Dietitian”) created the challenge to encourage public participation and awareness of the numerous nutrients and health benefits of eating foods with many colors.

I read the challenge to the members of our household. To my delight, they wanted to participate. The individuals who share our home come from diverse backgrounds with physical/emotional challenges and/or chronic illnesses, such as Cerebral Palsy, Autism, Seizure Disorders, Cancer & Heart Disease. We function as a family and came together due to medical and financial concerns.

This would be a memorable day. Our first meal together from planning, shopping, preparation to finally sitting down and eating as a family.



Family Members: Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RD, LDN (Camera Person, Narrator, House Mom, and Registered Dietitian); Jake Frank (22 years old; Menu Planner and Taste Tester); Jonathan Cruz (19 years old; Menu Planner and Food Prep); Lance Li (22 years old; Menu Planner, Shopper and Food Prep); David Bradbury, CNA (32 years old; Nurse's Aide and assisted with feeding); Paul Mitchell (40 something years old; Camera Shy).

Our Guests: Michelle Canazaro (22 years old; Food Prep and Taste Tester) and Cory Munce (21 years old; Food Prep and Taste Tester)





Planning
When planning our meal we considered finances, physical abilities & of course, color.

Finances

Our goal was to keep the cost around $2.00 per person. We looked for store coupons, specials and purchased store brands when available. We asked our guests to bring a food listed on our menu.

Then a strange miracle occurred. Before I left for the market, I went to get the mail. Someone had sent us a $50.00 Publix gift certificate. Without the gift certificate, the cost per meal was over $3.00 per person and with the gift, we were able to purchase food for a few days.


Adaptations and Individual Preferences


The meal would feed six people, each with unique needs.

My son Jake was born with Cerebral Palsy and is a quadriplegia. He is unable to hold utensils and requires a straw to drink fluids. Finger foods and a weighted cup with a flexi straw usually provide him the most independence.
When purchasing pasta, I look for shapes about one-inch long and easy to hold, such as Rotini (a helix or corkscrew-shaped pasta).  As a backup plan, sandwiches are easy to make from most recipes and a perfect finger food.

At times, Jake’s muscles get so tight he requires assistance with feeding. This was one of those times - the day we made our video.

Other considerations, included:
· Vegetarian
· Mechanical Soft or Puree Foods
· Hates Vegetables
· Low Sodium


Food Choices
I gave everyone a picture list of foods with various colors. (Some of our family members are unable to read.) From the list, we prepared our menu. I was pleased to learn, everyone liked spinach (except Michelle, but that would change.)
 
Menus and Recipes 

Fruits and vegetables are foods I try to have readily available everyday and throughout the day. I find when members of our home snack on low calorie - high fiber foods they are less likely to overeat at meals and during the day. The cheese is usually available a few times a week.

Sliced Green and Red Apples
(1/2 cup, 33 calories; 1.5 g Dietary Fiber)
2 Carrots and 2 Celery Sticks
(17 calories; 1.2 g Dietary Fiber)
Green and Red-Purple Grapes
(1/2 cup; 52 calories; 1 g Dietary Fiber)
Cheese Cubes, Reduced-fat Cheddar & Monterey Jack
(1 oz; 81 Calories; 0 g Dietary Fiber)
Trail Mix with Cashews, Peanuts, Raisins, Dried Banana Chips
(1/4 cup; 188 Calories; 2 g Dietary Fiber)
Fat Free Ranch Dressing for Vegetables
(1 Tbsp; 21 Calories; 0 g Dietary Fiber)
Low fat Yogurt Dip for Fruits
(2 Tbsp; 28 Calories; 0 g Dietary Fiber)

Main-courses
 
Tri-color Pasta Bar
Directions

1. If using frozen spinach, thaw and drain.
2. Tri-color pasta, cook according to manufacturer’s directions.
3. Dice tomatoes and onions; combine and toss gently; set aside 3/4 cup to use with the salad and/or pasta toppings.
4. Dice bell peppers and add to the salad and topping ingredients.
5. Heat garlic with cooking spray in a saucepan over medium heat. Cook until soft, but not browned.
6. Add onions and tomatoes, continue cooking until soft.
7. Add spinach; toss gently. Cook until the spinach is heated through. Place in a serving dish and reserve 1/2 cup spinach mixture per serving for the following sandwich recipe (Red, White and Green Grilled Cheese).
8. Prepare turkey meatballs and pasta sauce using your favorite recipes.

Serving the Pasta: Create a “Pasta Bar”

1. Place pasta in a large serving bowl.
2. Serve the following sides around the Pasta:
  a. Spinach mixture, cooked
  b. Diced Tomatoes, Onions and Peppers
  c. Shredded Part-skim Mozzarella
  d. Turkey Meatballs, 1.5 oz each
  e. Shredded Chicken
  f.  Pasta Sauce
  g. Tossed Salad


Nutritional Information:
Tri-color Pasta (without meat).
351 Calories; 17 g Protein; 55 g Carbohydrates; 5.3 g Dietary Fiber; 6.2 g Fat; 15 mg Cholesterol; 3288 IU Vitamin A; 0.6 mg Vitamin B1; 0.4 mg Vitamin B2; 51 mg Vitamin C; 46 mcg Folate; 340 mg Calcium; 3 mg Iron; 648 mg Potassium; 343 mg Sodium

Tri-color Pasta (with meatballs and chicken).
439 Calories; 35 g Protein; 55 g Carbohydrates; 5.3 g Dietary Fiber; 7.9 g Fat; 53 mg Cholesterol; 3295 IU Vitamin A; 0.6 mg Vitamin B1; 0.5 mg Vitamin B2; 51 mg Vitamin C; 47 mcg Folate; 344 mg Calcium; 4 mg Iron; 715 mg Potassium; 382 mg Sodium

Red, White and Green Grilled Cheese
From the cookbook, “Keep the Beat Recipes” developed for the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI). The cookbook also includes information on cooking, nutrition, and feeding children (including picky eaters). A free copy of the cookbook is available on the NHLBI website.

Directions
1. Preheat oven to 400 ºF. Place a baking sheet in the oven to preheat for about 10 minutes.
2. Assembling the Sandwich
  a. Take one slice whole wheat bread and top with 1/2 cup Spinach mixture, cooked and cooled from the recipe above.
  b. Top with 1/4 cup Part-skim Mozzarella Cheese
  c. Cover with second slice of whole wheat bread.
3. Use cooking spray on the preheated nonstick baking sheet.
4. Place the sandwich(es) on the baking sheet.
5. Bake for about 4 to 6 minutes or until the bottom starts to brown.
6. Carefully turn the sandwich over and bake for an additional 3 to 4 minutes or until both sides are browned.
7. Serve immediately.

Nutritional Information:
283 Calories; 16 g Protein; 37 g Carbohydrates; 7.3 g Dietary Fiber; 7 g Fat; 15 mg Cholesterol; 4273 IU Vitamin A; 0.3 mg Vitamin B1; 0.3 mg Vitamin B2; 17 mg Vitamin C; 51 mcg Folate; 333 mg Calcium; 3 mg Iron; 597 mg Potassium; 470 mg Sodium

Dessert or Snack
 

Fruit Kebab
Directions
1. Purchase disposable wooden skewers. With young children or people with limited hand and arm mobility, cut the pointed tips off and seal securely with tin foil or a soft material to prevent injury.
2. Purchase enough fruit to yield about 3/4 cup per person.
3. Choose a variety of fruits and cut into slices, wedges or chunks. Grapes and strawberries use whole.
4. Place the pieces of fruit on the skewer to create a colorful arrangement.
5. “Enjoy the fruits of your labor”.

Nutritional Information:
43 Calories; 0.6 g Protein; 11 g Carbohydrates; 1.2 g Dietary Fiber; 0 g Fat; 0 mg Cholesterol; 877 IU Vitamin A; 21 mg Vitamin C; 11 mg Calcium; 0.2 mg Iron; 165 mg Potassium; 6 mg Sodium

Fruit Smoothie, 2 servings
Directions
1. Place in blender the following ingredients:
  1/2 cup Skim Milk
  1 cup low fat ice cream or frozen yogurt
2. Cover and blend the milk and ice cream
3. Add 1 to 1-1/2 cups of assorted fruit. Remove large pits from fruit and if using an orange, remove the peel before placing in the blender.
4. Cover and puree until smooth. Pour into glasses to serve.

Nutritional Information:
170 Calories; 7 g Protein; 30 g Carbohydrates; 1.2 g Dietary Fiber; 3 g Fat; 15 mg Cholesterol; 1270 IU Vitamin A; 0.1 mg Vitamin B1; 0.1 mg Vitamin B2; 19 mg Vitamin C; 46 mcg Folate; 213 mg Calcium; 0.3 mg Iron; 255 mg Potassium; 110 mg Sodium 
 

Memorable Moments

Michelle.  “The tri-color pasta is great.” (Even after I told her, spinach was one of the ingredients.) We laughed and Michelle said, “I guess I must like spinach.”


Lance.  “I never realized there were so many healthy foods that look and taste good.”

Jonathan. “I think lemonade is the healthiest drink in the world.”

Cory. ”I’ll have a little bit of pasta; I’m full from making the fruit kebabs.”

Jake. “Mom - You haven’t cooked since I was a baby. This is good; can we do it again?”

David. “This is beautiful watching the kids help plan and prepare a healthy meal together.”

Paul. “I can’t believe you got everyone involved.”

Sandra. I’ve always worried what would happen to Jake once I was gone, but as I looked around the room I saw laughter, friendship and new family connections being formed. Yes, this was a memorable day, so rich in beautiful colors and endless possibilities.


Wellness News employs young adults with "Special Needs" (Cerebral Palsy, Autism, Down Syndrome, Muscular Dystrophy). Many of the food art photographs are available for purchase with the proceeds going to special need young adults. Contact Dr. Sandra Frank for additional information (recipenews@gmail.com).

Jonathan Cruz
Michelle Canazaro
Cory Munce





Friday, July 12, 2019

Eat Your Jello Day or Jello as an Art Medium

Eat Your

 


Day



Jelly or jello comes from gelatin. The Gelatin found in Jell-O comes from the collagen in cow or pig bones, hooves, and connective tissues. Gelatin is not recommended for vegetarians. In 1923 D-Zerta became the first sugar-free gelatin dessert.  

Agar or agar-agar is a gelatinous substance derived from agarophyte (red algae). Agar is used as an ingredient in desserts, a vegetarian gelatin substitute, a thickener for soups, in jellies, ice cream, and other desserts. Agar-agar is approximately 80% fiber and serves to regulate bowel movements.  

Agar-agar is sold in packages as washed and dried strips or in powdered form. For making jelly, it is boiled in water until the solids dissolve. Sweetener, flavoring, coloring, fruit or vegetables are then added and the liquid is poured into molds to be served as desserts and vegetable aspics, or incorporated with other desserts.  Reference: Wikipedia




Liz Hickok is a San Francisco-based artist known for her work in Jell-O. Her artwork is exhibited across the country and internationally. The WhiteHouse in Jell-O was created in honor of President Obama's first 100 days in office. Hickok appeared on the Food Network Awards Show, where she won an award for “Best Use of Food as Art Medium.” Click the link to view Liz Hickok portfolio







As a dietitian, gelatin became known as a stable for clear liquid and full-liquid diets. It is often recommended for vomiting as a means to replace fluid loss and provide calories. The sugar-free gelatin became a favorite for individuals as a "Free Food" on weight-loss programs and diabetic diets. Gelatin is considered a fluid and therefore must be calculated when a patient is placed on a fluid restriction. 


Jell-O Commercial
2010



Links
Jell-O Recipes
7 Wacky Jell-O Molds from Around the World



Wednesday, May 8, 2019

Walk or Bike to School Day


Walking and bicycling to school enables children to incorporate the regular physical activity they need each day while also forming healthy habits that can last a lifetime. 

Regular physical activity helps children build strong bones, muscles, and joints, and it decreases the risk of obesity. In contrast, insufficient physical activity can contribute to chronic diseases, such as diabetes, heart disease, cancer, and stroke.

Resources
1. National Bike and Walk to School Day http://www.walkbiketoschool.org/

Saturday, April 6, 2019

World Health Day - Universal Health Care For All



About WHO
Who we are, what we do

"Our goal is to build a better, healthier future for people all over the world. Working through offices in more than 150 countries, WHO staff work side by side with governments and other partners to ensure the highest attainable level of health for all people.

Together we strive to combat diseases – infectious diseases like influenza and HIV and noncommunicable ones like cancer and heart disease. We help mothers and children survive and thrive so they can look forward to a healthy old age. We ensure the safety of the air people breathe, the food they eat, the water they drink – and the medicines and vaccines they need."



World Health Day

    Key messages for World Health Day





1. Universal health coverage is about ensuring all people can get quality health services, where and when they need them, without suffering financial hardship.

2. No one should have to choose between good health and other life necessities.

3. UHC is key to people’s and nations’ health and well-being.
UHC is feasible. Some countries have made great progress. Their challenge is to maintain coverage to meet people’s expectations.

4. All countries will approach UHC in different ways: there is no one size fits all. But every country can do something to advance UHC.

5. Making health services truly universal requires a shift from designing health systems around diseases and institutions towards health services designed around and for people.



Providing Nutrition Is a Human Right


Friday, March 1, 2019

National Nutrition Month 2019

National Nutrition Month® is an annual nutrition education and information campaign created by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The campaign is celebrated each year during the month of March, The focus is on the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits. In addition, National Nutrition Month® promotes the Academy and its members to the public and the media as the most valuable and credible source of timely, scientifically-based food and nutrition information.


Registered Dietitian Nutritionist Day is also celebrated during National Nutrition Month®, on the second Wednesday in March. This year it is March 13, 2019. The occasion increases awareness of registered dietitian nutritionists (RDN) as the indispensable providers of food and nutrition services while recognizing both RDNs and nutrition and dietetic technicians, registered for their commitment to helping people enjoy healthy lives.


2019 NNM Campaign
In an effort to accommodate the diverse areas in which National Nutrition Month® is celebrated and allow greater flexibility in the promotion of healthful messages, this year National Nutrition Month® will be honored as its own theme. This will allow the NNM campaign to focus on its original purpose, which is: "To increase the public's awareness of the importance of good nutrition and position Academy members as the authorities in nutrition."

During National Nutrition Month®, help the Academy achieve its vision of a world where all people thrive through the transformative power of food and nutrition.



Thursday, February 21, 2019

National Nutrition Month,
“Eat Right, Your Way, Every Day”

I enjoy playing with words and seeing if I can come up with a meaningful world that goes with the National Nutrition Month® Theme, “Eat Right, Your Way, Every Day.”

With some juggling and creativity, here is what I came up with.


National Nutrition Month® (NNM) is more than a game; it is a "nutrition education and information campaign created annually by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (Academy). The campaign focuses attention on the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits." 




What does "Eat Right, 
Your Way, Every Day" Mean?








National Nutrition Month
Go Further with Food

National Nutrition Month® 2018 is a nutrition education and information campaign created annually in March by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The campaign focuses attention on the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits.

2018 NNM Theme - "Go Further with Food". The foods you choose can make a real difference. Preparing your foods to go further, by planning meals and snacks in advance can also help to reduce food loss and waste. This year's theme for National Nutrition Month® encourages us to achieve the numerous benefits healthy eating habits offer, but it also urges us to find ways to cut back on food waste. Learning how to manage food resources at home will help you "Go Further with Food" while saving both nutrients and money. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics https://www.eatright.org/



National Nutrition Month, Preview

March is National Nutrition Month® (NNM), a nutrition education and information campaign created annually by the American Dietetic Association (ADA). The campaign focuses attention on the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits. The March 2011 theme for National Nutrition Month® is "Eat Right with Color."




The theme explores the health benefits associated with eating foods of many colors. "Eating a rainbow" refers to including color diversity in your meals and food choices, so as to enhance your intake of a wide range of nutrients. During the month of March, we will explore the colors of foods and their benefits.

Red and Pink Foods
Hosts: Robert (Red) and Pam (Pink)
Apples, Beets, Cayenne, Cherries, Cranberries, Guava, Kidney Beans, Papaya, Pink Beans, Pink/Red Grapefruit, Pomegranates, Radicchio, Radishes, Raspberries, Red Bell Peppers, Red Cabbages, Red Chili Peppers, Red Corn, Red Currants, Red Grapes, Red Onions, Red Pears, Red Peppers, Red Plums, Red Potatoes, Red Tomatoes, Rhubarb, Strawberries, Tomatoes, Watermelons

Green Foods
Host: Grace (Green)
Alfalfa, Artichokes, Arugula, Asparagus, Avocado, Bok Choy, Broccoli, Broccoli rabe, Brussels Sprouts, Celery, Chives, Collard Greens, Cucumbers, Dandelion Greens, Edamame, Endive, Fennel, Green apples, Green Beans, Green cabbage, Green Grapes, Green Olives, Green Onion, Green Pears, Green Peas, Green Pepper, Green Tomatoes, Honeydew, Kale, Kiwi, Leeks, Lettuce, Limes, Mint, Okra, Oregano, Parsley, Pistachios, Snow Peas, Spinach, Sugar snap peas, Swiss Chard, Tarragon, Tomatillo, Wasabi, Watercress, Zucchini

Blue and Purple Foods
Hosts: Brooke (Blue); Betty (Light Blue); and Peggy (Purple)
Blue Grapes, Blue and Purple Potatoes, Blueberries, Dried Plums, Plums, Eggplant, Pomegranates, Elderberries, Juniper Berries, Kelp (Seaweed), Purple Belgian Endive, Purple Cabbage, Purple Figs

Yellow and Orange Foods
Hosts: Yoko (Yellow), York (Yellow) and Oliver (Orange)
Apricots, Bananas, Butternut Squash, Cantaloupe, Carrots, Cheddar Cheese, Citrus Fruits, Clementines, Coriander, Corn, Creamsicle, Dill, Garbanzo Beans, Golden Apples, Golden Flax Seed, Golden Raisins, Grapefruit, Honey, Lemon, Lemongrass, Mandarin Oranges, Mangoes, Nectarines, Orange Jello, Orange Peppers, Orange Tomatoes, Oranges, Papaya, Parsnips, Peaches, Pears, Persimmons, Pineapple, Pumpkin, Rutabagas, Saffron, Salmon, Spaghetti Squash, Squash Blossoms, Sweet Corn, Sweet Potatoes, Tangerines, Whole Grains, Yams, Yellow Apples, Yellow Beans, Yellow Peppers, Yellow Summer Squash, Yellow Wax Beans

White and Black Foods
Hosts: Wendy (White) and Brian (Black)
White: Cauliflower, Coconut, Garlic, Ginger, Green Onions, Scallions, Horseradish, Jicama, Kohlrabi, Leeks, Millet, Mushrooms, Onions, Parsnips, Quinoa, Shallots, Soy Products, Sunflower Seeds, Tofu, Turnips, White Beans, White Corn, White Sesame Seeds

Black: Black Beans, Black Cherries, Black Currants, Black Mushrooms, Black Olives, Black Quinoa, Black Raspberry, Black Rice, Black Sesame Seeds, Black Soybeans, Blackberries, Boysenberries, Prunes, Raisins, Seaweeds, Tamari (Soy Sauce)


My staff and I started the project in September 2010, when ADA announced the theme. Over the next five months, we would take over 600 photographs of colorful foods in order to create the March presentation for NNM. Many of the photographs are available for purchase with the proceeds going to special need young adults. Contact Dr. Sandra Frank for additional information (recipenews@gmail.com).

Sunday, February 10, 2019

National Jell-O Week

February is National Snack Month


 


Week



Jelly or jello comes from gelatin. The Gelatin found in Jell-O comes from the collagen in cow or pig bones, hooves and connective tissues. Gelatin is not recommended for vegetarians. In 1923 D-Zerta became the first sugar-free gelatin dessert.  

Agar or agar-agar is a gelatinous substance derived from agarophyte (red algae). Agar is used as an ingredient in desserts, a vegetarian gelatin substitute, a thickener for soups, in jellies, ice cream and other desserts. Agar-agar is approximately 80% fiber and serves to regulate bowel movements.  

Agar-agar is sold in packages as washed and dried strips or in powdered form. For making jelly, it is boiled in water until the solids dissolve. Sweetener, flavouring, colouring, fruit or vegetables are then added and the liquid is poured into molds to be served as desserts and vegetable aspics, or incorporated with other desserts.  Reference: Wikipedia



Liz Hickok is a San Francisco-based artist known for her work in Jell-O. Her artwork is exhibited across the country and internationally. Hickok’s San Francisco in Jell-O has been covered by The New York Times, Harper’s, Gastronomica, and appeared on the cover of Artweek. Hickok also appeared on the Food Network Awards Show, where she won an award for “Best Use of Food as Art Medium.” Click the link to view Liz Hickok portfolio







As a dietitian, gelatin became known as a stable for clear liquid and full-liquid diets. It is often recommended for vomiting as a means to replace fluid loss and provide calories. The sugar-free gelatin became a favorite for individuals as a "Free Food" on weight-loss programs and diabetic diets. Gelatin is considered a fluid and therefore must be calculated when a patient is placed on a fluid restriction. 


Jell-O Commercial

2010




Links
Jell-O Recipes
7 Wacky Jell-O Molds from Around the World

Saturday, June 30, 2018

Social Media Dietitians

"Making the World a Healthier Place"



Social Media Defined.

Social media has become an integral part of modern society. There are general social networks with user bases larger than the population of most countries. There are niche sites for virtually every special interest out there. There are sites to share photos, videos, status updates, sites for meeting new people and sites to connect with old friends. It seems there are social solutions to just about every need.
     
- Cameron Chapman, written exclusively for WDD1

Social Media is the ability to Communicate and Interact with people of similar interests throughout the world by means of the World Wide Web (Web for short). Social Media is still in its infancy, but currently it is being used in numerous areas, such as:
Networking
Education
News
Arts and Entertainment
Marketing, Advertising and Sales
Brand Recognition
Philanthropy
Friendship and Support

Social Media History

The history is short, but the growth massive. In December 1995 about 16 million people (0.4% World Population) were using the Web. By September 2010 the number grew to 1,971 million users (28.8% World Population) 2.

Social Media has become a major force in communication utilized by individuals, women, men, children, teenagers, parents, grandparents, families, media, professional associations, educators, health professionals, government agencies, business, industry, advertising, marketing, public relations, charitable affiliations, religious organizations, support groups, artists and entertainers. The impact is at the local, statewide, national and international levels.


Significant Events in the Development of Social Media
1965                            The first network experiment was conducted.
1981                            IBM creates its first Personal Computer; Microsoft creates DOS.
1983                            DNS (Domain Name System) is designed
1987                            10,000 hosts on the Internet; 25 million PCs sold in US
1989                            100,000 hosts on Internet.

1991, August 6th          the World Wide Web becomes public.
2000, February            10,000,000 domain names have been registered
2000, September         20,000,000 websites on the Internet, numbers doubled since February 2000
2003                           LinkedIn founded.
                                  MySpace founded.

2004                           Zuckerberg launches "Thefacebook"
2005                           YouTube.com launches
2006                           Twitter is created by Jack Dorsey
                                  Estimated 92 million Web sites online
2010                           Twitter has grown worldwide and currently has more than 100 million users

2010, July                   Facebook has more than 500 million active users



 LinkedIn was founded in 2003 and was one of the first social networks devoted to business. Originally, LinkedIn allowed users to post a profile and to interact through private messaging. Gradually, other features have been added, including groups, question and answer forums, and advanced profile features, including real-time updates.

 As of November 2, 2010, LinkedIn had more than 80 million registered users, spanning more than 200 countries and territories worldwide. Quantcast reports LinkedIn has 21.4 million monthly unique U.S. visitors and 47.6 million globally.


 MySpace.com was founded in 2003 and by 2006 had grown to be one of the most popular social networks. It offers a variety of tools and features, including blogging and instant messaging. Due to the competition from Facebook, MySpace shifted its focus to social entertainment (sharing music, movie and TV-related content). It now has some 125 million users but with decreasing traffic (2010). Fastest growing demographics are 18-24 year olds.



 Facebook started out as a Harvard-only social network back in 2004. In 2008 Facebook became the most popular social networking site, surpassing MySpace, and continues to grow. July 2010 Statistics: Over 500 million active users (50% of which sign-in daily); Over 900 million pages, groups, communities and events; Over 150 million active users who access through mobile devices.



 YouTube was the first major video hosting and sharing site, launched in 2005. Users can upload videos and share them through YouTube or by embedding them on other websites (social networks, blogs, forums, etc.). YouTube’s major social features include ratings, comments, and the option to subscribe to the channels of a user’s favorite video creators.  In November 2006, YouTube, LLC was bought by Google Inc. and now operates as a subsidiary of Google. In October 2010, Google published its third quarter financial results for the year, which stated that YouTube was serving two billion videos a week accompanied by advertising.



Blogs are usually maintained by an individual with regular articles and updates. A typical blog combines text, images and links to other blogs, Web pages, and other media related to the topic. The ability of readers to leave comments in an interactive format is an important part of many blogs. As of December 2007, blog search engine Technorati was tracking more than 112,000,000 blogs.


Blogger is a blog publishing service that allows private or multi-user blogs with time-stamped entries. It was launched in 1999 by Pyra Labs, which was bought by Google in 2003. Blogger was ranked 16 on the list of top 50 domains in terms of number of unique visitors in 2007.Wordpress is one of the most popular blog platform on the Internet, with both an online hosted version and a downloadable self installation version available. WordPress offers many features including RSS syndication and easy to use administration features.


 Twitter is a micro-blogging platform. It was founded in 2006. As of April 2010, Twitter users were signing up at the rate of 300,000 daily and the site had over 105 million registered users. There are over 55 million daily tweets and 600 million daily search queries.





Opportunities for Dietitians


The dietitian is using Social Media to communicate, teach, learn, share and exchange information and ideas. The dietitian can be found:
  • Networking with colleagues locally, statewide, national and/or international
  • Reporting on the News
  • Writing Blogs on numerous subjects, including nutrition, health, recipes, shopping, editorials, consumer interests, weight control, diabetes, networking, child nutrition and many more diverse topics.
  • Designing online resources and tools for the consumer, educator, journalist and health professional
  • Working with the government, industry and professional associations to develop nutrition education programs
  • Utilizing entertainment and art to send health messages
  • Offering Continuing Education courses
  • Providing online nutrition counseling
  • Creating communities to offer support to colleagues and the consumer
  • Developing friendships
Can you think of other ways dietitians are using social media?


References.
  1. The History and Evolution of Social Media
  2. Internet World Stats
  3. Dietitians-Online.com 




Nutrition.gov News

Dietitian Blog List