Monday, December 30, 2013

2013 Eat Right Art Favorites

2013 Favorites from the Eat Right Art Collection

All photographs are available for purchase. Visit the Eat Right Art Collection or contact Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN, LN for custom designs.
The money we raise goes to employ adults with "Special Needs" (Cerebral Palsy, Autism, Down Syndrome, Muscular Dystrophy). Please make a donation or purchase a design.

Prepared by 
Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RD, LDN
Jake Frank
Michelle Canazaro
John Gargiullo

Thursday, December 19, 2013

Book Review: "Younger Next Week" by Elisa Zied, MS, RD, CDN

Elisa Zied, MS, RD, CDN is a remarkable person who motivates people to reach their goals though her books and media presence. Her new book, "Younger Next Week" captures the attention of the 40+ generation. Zied shares her secrets to turning back the clock by emphasizing, "vitality" in the foods we choose, lifestyle behaviors, and fitness.

In “Younger Next Week”, Zied offers surgery-free solutions that defy aging and promote healthy weight loss and emotional well-being with an easy to follow 7-Day Vitality Plan. The book features a Vitality Blueprint consisting of Zied’s signature “Stressipes” for optimal sleep and relation. The blueprint can be easily personalized for nutritional needs, interests, and schedule. 

“Younger Next Week is an empowering anti-aging, food based, vitality promoting book that shows women how to jump-start a lifetime of healthy habits.

Younger Next Week Free Giveaway (ends December 31)

To follow and learn more about Elisa Zied, MS, RD, CDN visit her at 
Website: Elisa Zied

Monday, December 16, 2013

Happy Kwanzaa

"Kwanzaa was created to introduce and reinforce seven basic values of African culture which contribute to building and reinforcing family, community and culture among African American people as well as Africans throughout the world African community. These values are called the Nguzo Saba which in Swahili means the Seven Principles. The Nguzo Saba stand at the heart of the origin and meaning of Kwanzaa, for it is these values which are not only the building blocks for community but also serve to reinforce and enhance them."   - Dr. Maulana Karenga (Founder and Creator)

Kwanzaa is a week-long celebration observed from December 26 to January 1 each year.

Edible Art: Seven Basic Principles of Kwanzaa.
The colors of the Kwanzaa flag are black, red and green; black for the people, red for their struggle, and green for the future and hope that comes from their struggle. It is based on the colors given by the Hon. Marcus Garvey as national colors for African people throughout the world.

The Kwanzaa art includes the following foods: apples, raspberries, strawberries, black beans, prunes, black berries, black rice, green bell peppers, broccoli, spinach, grapes, and string  beans.

Kwanzaa has seven basic symbols. Each represents values and concepts reflective of African culture and contributive to community building and reinforcement. The following are the basic symbols:

Mazao (The Crops) These are symbolic of African harvest celebrations and of the rewards of productive and collective labor. 

Mkeka (The Mat) This is symbolic of our tradition and history and therefore, the foundation on which we build. 

Kinara (The Candle Holder) This is symbolic of our roots, our parent people -- continental Africans.

Muhindi (The Corn) This is symbolic of our children and our future which they embody.

Mishumaa Saba (The Seven Candles) These are symbolic of the Nguzo Saba, the Seven Principles, the matrix and minimum set of values which African people are urged to live by in order to rescue and reconstruct their lives in their own image and according to their own needs.

Kikombe cha Umoja (The Unity Cup) This is symbolic of the foundational principle and practice of unity which makes all else possible.

Zawadi (The Gifts) These are symbolic of the labor and love of parents and the commitments made and kept by the children. 

The following videos share the history and traditions of Kwanzaa. The first video was created by Sesame Street and the story of Kwanzaa is told through a young  boy; the second video is a Happy Kwanzaa song by Teddy Pendergrass; and the third video is a trailer from "The Black Candle", narrated by Maya Angelou.

Sesame Street: Kwanzaa

Happy Kwanzaa 
Teddy Pendergrass

Kwanzaa, a Celebration.
"The Black Candle" trailer, 
narrated by Maya Angelou.

Wishing the lights of Kwanzaa
brings happiness, warmth and prosperity.

The Official Kwanzaa Web Site
The Official Kwanzaa Web Site, to make a donation  

 Wikipedia: Kwanzaa 

When you learn something from people, or from a culture,
you accept it as a gift, and it is your lifelong commitment
to preserve it and build on it. 
- Yo-Yo Ma

2014 Food, Nutrition, and Wellness Events Ebook
An Indispensable Tool for the Food and Health Writer

The “2014 Food, Nutrition, and Wellness Events” ebook is an indispensable tool for the food and/or health writer, blogger, dietitian, and editor. Each month highlights food, nutrition, and wellness events for the month, week, and day. Food photographs or graphic designs are provided to illustrate special events. In December, books by dietitians are featured.

The holidays and events listed come from numerous resources, such as: United States Department of Agriculture, Food and Drug Administration, Presidential Declaration, Federal, State or City Governments, Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Food Associations, American Medical Association, Medical Affiliations, Private Organizations and Companies, Retail Promotions. The events have been verified. However, you should confirm the dates before making plans. Some events may vary from one state to another.

The “Wellness News” calendar employs adults with "Special Needs" (Cerebral Palsy, Autism, Down Syndrome, and Muscular Dystrophy). Part of the monies raised go to employ special need adults.

2014 Food, Nutrition and Wellness Events

Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN
Digital Downloads

The Edible Alphabet

Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN
Digital Download


Eat Right Art &
Photographs at Etsy
Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN
Digital Downloads

History of the Wellness Calendar

The wellness calendar has a history spanning over 20 years. When my son Jake was about two years old (back in 1990), he discovered the joys of celebrations and holidays. As most children, he associated these events with family, food, fun, music and gifts.

We had just recently learned Jake has cerebral palsy. Much of his young life had numerous challenges; it was a delight to see him so excited about these events.

Every day he would ask me, “What are we celebrating today?” Initially, I would make up events, such as a new tooth, the sun is out, etc... Eventually I would research reference books and later the Internet to see if there were special functions occurring on a specific day.

To my surprise, I found numerous events each day of the year, but there were too many and it was a bit overwhelming. I started to note those days that dealt only with Health, Nutrition, Food, Safety, Disability Rights and Environmental Issues.

I realized many of these events went unnoticed or unreported by Journalists, Educators and Health Professionals. In 2002, I started to send out about 50 calendars to local and national media representatives in the hope the topics would encourage awareness and inspire ideas for stories and/or projects. Each year the number of calendars we sent out would increase, as did the thank you notes from local, national and worldwide correspondents.

Then in 2006, Jake and his friends graduated high school. They were unable to find employment due to their disabilities. I asked them if they would be interested in working with me on the Wellness Calendar. They said, “Yes”.

The project became a wonderful way to raise money to help them with their ADL, self-esteem, independence.

The calendar was created to make sure every Journalist and Educator knew when certain events occurred, such as National Nutrition Month, World Diabetes Day, Earth Day, RD Day and many others. The goal was to provide a useful tool to impress their editors with some interesting time-sensitive stories.

Later on, the calendar served to provide employment to individuals who were unable to find jobs due to their special abilities.

Remember to Make Every Day Special, Make Every Day Count.

with warm regards,
Dr. Sandra Frank and Jake Frank

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Guest Blogger: Michelle Stewart, RD
Seven Foods and Five Drinks for a Very Merry Gluten-Free Holiday

7 Foods for a Very Merry Gluten-Free Holiday
1. Sugar cookies and Gingerbread men (made with GF flours: rice flour, potato starch, tapioca flour, and xanthan gum) 
  • Gluten-Free Flour Blend: To make flour blend, combine 2 cups rice flour, 2/3 cup potato starch, 1/3 cup tapioca flour and 1 teaspoon xanthan gum. Use appropria amount for recipe; store remainder in container with tight-fitting lid. Stir before using. 
2. Glazed Ham (toss out the glaze and make your own gluten-free glaze)

3. Quinoa, mushroom, or wild rice stuffing instead of traditional turkey stuffing

4. Meringue Cookies

5. Gravies thickened with cornstarch instead of flour

6. Gumbo with gluten-free Roux (made with sorghum flour instead of all-purpose flour)

7. Corn Bread (avoid store-bought mixes, and make it gluten free at home with gluten-free flour blend and gluten-free baking soda)
  • To make flour blend: combine 2 cups rice flour, 2/3 cup potato starch, 1/3 cup tapioca flour and 1 teaspoon xanthan gum. Use appropriate amount for recipe; store remainder in container with tight-fitting lid. Stir before using. 

5 Festive Gluten-Free Cocktails:
1. Homemade eggnog (warm or chilled)
2. Spiked Apple Cider
3. Rum Hot Toddy
4. Pomasa (Pomegranete juice and Champagne)
5. White Sangria

**Other alcohols that contain gluten:
Malted beverages

Guest Blogger: Michelle Stewart, MPH, RD, LD/N, CDE 

Michelle J. Stewart is a Registered and Licensed Dietitian and better known as The Nutrition Planner. Founder of Michelle Stewart Consulting & Associates who has been leading the way to a healthier you for more than 25 years. She is zealous when it comes to wellness from the inside out and empowering whomever she comes in contact with to take charge of their health and wellbeing. It is all about balance and moderation, her motto is “EAT LESS MOVE MORE”. Michelle is a Certified Diabetes Educator, and also holds certifications in Adult, Adolescent, and Childhood Obesity and is a Certified Wellness Coach. A Master’s In Public Health keeps her abreast of the latest health concerns and on the cutting edge of intervention. Focusing on aging and longevity with a holistic approach to living your best life is her pathway to inner peace and happiness.

An experienced and dynamic public speaker who specializes in the African American community, Ms. Stewart has participated in countless seminars and workshops all over the country. She was a panelist on health care topics at the African American Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C. where former Vice President Dick Cheney was the keynote speaker and the Healthy Breakfast keynote speaker at the annual National Newspapers Publishers Association convention in Chicago. 

Thursday, September 26, 2013

September, Fruit and Veggies - More Matters Month

Key Consumer Message:
Dietary Recommendations 
for Americans, 2010 
Fruits and Vegetables 

There are three reasons to eat the recommended amounts of fruits and vegetables.
1. Most vegetables and fruits contribute a wide variety of nutrients, including folate, magnesium, potassium, dietary fiber, and vitamins A, C, and K. 
2. Consumption of fruits and vegetables is associated with reduced risk of many chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and certain types of cancer.
3. Most fruits and vegetables have no cholesterol and are low in calories and fat. Eating more will help maintain a healthy weight.

What Foods Are in the Fruit and Vegetable Groups?

Fruits. Any fruit or 100% fruit juice counts as part of the Fruit Group. Fruits may be fresh, canned, frozen, or dried, and may be whole, cut-up, or pureed.

In general, 1 cup of fruit or 100% fruit juice, or ½ cup of dried fruit can be considered as 1 cup from the Fruit Group. The following link lists specific fruits and amounts that count as one cup of fruit (or in some cases equivalents for ½ cup are noted.) MyPlate Fruits. 

VegetablesAny vegetable or 100% vegetable juice counts as a member of the Vegetable Group. Vegetables may be raw or cooked; fresh, frozen, canned, or dried/dehydrated; and may be whole, cut-up, or mashed.  Vegetables are organized into 5 subgroups, based on their nutrient content. Dark-green vegetables; Red and orange vegetables; Beans and peas (legumes); Starchy vegetables; and Others. 

In general, 1 cup of raw or cooked vegetables or vegetable juice, or 2 cups of raw leafy greens is considered as 1 cup from the Vegetable Group. The following link lists specific vegetables and amounts that count as 1 cup of vegetables (or in some cases equivalents for ½ cup are noted).  
MyPlate Vegetables. 

How many fruits and vegetables 
are needed daily?

Safety with Fruits and Vegetables
* Rinse and wash fruits and vegetables before preparing or eating them. Under clean, running water, rub fruits and vegetables briskly with your hands to remove dirt and surface microorganisms. Dry with a clean cloth towel or paper towel after rinsing.
* Keep fruits and vegetables separate from raw meat, poultry and seafood while shopping, preparing and storing.

Teaching Kids to Eat Their
Fruits and Vegetables

Healthy Kids PSA: Color of Life

Bring color to your life, and your plate, with nutritious, delicious vegetables.
Fruits and Veggies, More Matters for healthy recipes, menus,
fruit and vegetable nutrition information, tips on healthy
meal planning and how to get your kids involved in healthy cooking!

Fruits and Vegetables Song


Friday, July 12, 2013

Cow Appreciation Day

July 12, 2013 Cow Appreciation Day
Origin. For one day only, black and white spots, cow bells and furry ears will be appropriate attire at Chick-fil-A restaurants all across the nation. In celebration of Cow Appreciation Day (an unofficial yet nationally recognized holiday), Chick-fil-A will award a FREE Meal (breakfast, lunch or dinner) to any customer who comes to one of their 1,600+ restaurants fully dressed as a cow.

Other Option for Cow Appreciation Day. Try a vegetarian meal today.

Tuesday, May 28, 2013

May 28, National Brisket Day
Brisket on Rye Makeover

The original sandwich contained 6-1/2 ounces of brisket. By cutting back the brisket to 2 ounces lean saves 470 calories. Add vegetables to give the sandwich height, fiber and additional nutrients.
2 oz Brisket, lean
2 sl Rye Bread w/seeds
1 Onion, sliced
1/3 Red Pepper, grilled 
1 Romaine Leaves
6 Grape Tomatoes 
1/3 Cucumber, chopped
1 Tbsp Light Vinaigrette

Food Facts
Brisket is a beef cut taken from the breast or lower chest section, behind the foreshank. Brisket is an inexpensive boneless cut. In order to tenderize, the meat requires long, slow cooking to break down the collagen in the connective muscle tissues. 

Methods of Cooking
1. Basting
2. Smoking: Rubbing with a spice rub or marinating, then cooking slowly over indirect heat from charcoal or wood.

Tradition / Culture

Jewish: Braised as a pot roast; or cut for corned beef, which is further spiced and smoked to make pastrami.

Hong Kong: Cooked with spices over low heat until tender, and is commonly served with noodles in soup or curry.

Korean: Traditionally it is first boiled at low temperature with aromatic vegetables, then pressed with a heavy object overnight and served thinly sliced.

Britain: Cooked very slowly in a lidded casserole dish with gravy. The dish, known as a pot roast in the USA but more commonly as braised or stewed beef in the UK, is often accompanied by root vegetables.

Wikipedia. Brisket
ESHA, Food Processor

Wednesday, May 22, 2013

May 22, International Day for Biological Diversity:
Water and Biodiversity

The United Nations has proclaimed May 22 The International Day for Biological Diversity (IDB). The 2013 theme is Water and Biodiversity; chosen to coincide with the United Nations designation of 2013 as the International Year of Water Cooperation. In addition, the period 2005-2015 is the International Decade for Action 'WATER FOR LIFE'.

UN Secretary-General message
"International Year of Water Cooperation 2013"

The United Nations has prepared materials on Natural Solutions For Water Security. This is a segment on "The Elements of Good Practices in the Drinking Water Sector".

Finalists of 2013 edition of UN-Water 

´Water for Life´ Best Practices Award

Clean water, free of pollution, bacteria and other contaminants, is the bedrock upon which sustainable, thriving and equitable human societies are built. Good governance of the ecosystems providing us with quality drinking water is an essential pre-requisite involving the cooperation of private sector enterprises, all levels of government, public agencies, indigenous and local communities, NGOs and other relevant stakeholders.

Water is a deeply local issue in terms of availability, economic and environmental setting, climate and conflicting interests. 

Good policy approaches for drinking water require holistic strategic approaches involving full consideration of:
* Water quality and availability
* Managing drinking water for both present and future needs
* Maintaining ecosystem integrity and functions

* The role of biodiversity
* Realistic approaches

Sunday, May 19, 2013

Allrecipe's Homemade Black Bean Veggie Burgers
Fails the Nutrition Analysis Review

Fails the Nutrition Analysis Review

Below is the nutrition analysis from Allrecipes compared to our Review. Both companies used the same database. The results show a significant difference.

1. Repeat Dietitians-Online's analysis. Look for errors. 
2. Duplicate the author’s numbers, if possible. 

1. Results were 
duplicated related to the author’s failure to drain and strain the beans.
2. The recipe called for a 16 oz can black beans, drained and strained. Produced 12.5 ounces black beans and significant less sodium.
3. The nutrition analysis should be based on the Edible Portion of foods; not As Purchased (unless eaten whole).

The Homemade Black Bean Veggie Burgers can fit into the following food plans with the help of a registered dietitian: low calorie, low fat, sodium restricted, and high fiber. Good source of vitamin C and A.

Performing a nutrition analysis by database requires knowledge and skills in culinary art, food science, production, waste, straining, draining, marinating, nutrient absorption, software pros and cons, and conversion factors. Nutrition software is only as good as the professional interpreting the data. 

For the past 25 years I've specialized in Nutrition Analysis and Recipe Modification. My mission is to locate inaccurate nutrition analysis; provide nutrition information when it is not available; and offer modifications for special dietary needs.

If you need assistance with your Nutrition Analysis needs,
please contact us.

Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN, LN

Saturday, May 18, 2013

You are Invited to the Opening of the Eatright Art Gallery

The theme of the gallery ....

-The presentation of food should stimulate the palate, excite the senses, and nourish the body. -Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN, LN

- When you prepare nourishing foods with love, passion, and creativity, people will delight in your creations. - Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN

Please make a donation. Monies raised goes to employ
Special Need Adults.

Thank you for your generosity and kindness.

Choose from hundreds of food photographs, graphic designs
or we can customize your own brand

All Photographs and Graphics are original designs and are available for purchase.
Cost $6.00 per design (exclusivity is available for an additional charge).
The designs are available only in a digital format (jpg; bmp; pdf)
Contact Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN, LN
for purchase
Thank you.
Prepared by Dietitians-Online©, 2013

Visit Dietitians-Online, to view
the art gallery on the website.

Saturday, April 6, 2013

April 7, 2013 - World Health Day
Control Your Blood Pressure

World Health Day is celebrated on April 7 to commemorate the founding of the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1948. Each year a theme is chosen to address a significant global health concern. The theme for World Health Day 2013 is controlling high blood pressure, which affects more than one in three adults worldwide. High blood pressure or hypertension can lead to fatal heart attacks, strokes, and chronic heart and kidney disease.

Many people do not know they have high blood pressure because it does not always cause symptoms. Hypertension is easily diagnosed and treated if health care services are available. 

For many people, lifestyle changes are sufficient to control blood pressure. For others, medication is needed.
Early detection is key; all adults should know their blood pressure.

Salt Matters: Preserving Choice, 
Protecting Health

Where does sodium come from?
Sodium comes from natural sources or are added to foods. Most foods in their natural state contain some sodium. However, the majority of sodium Americans consume comes from sodium added to processed foods by manufacturers. While some of this sodium is added to foods for safety reasons, the amount of salt added to processed foods is above what is required for safety and function of the food supply.

Reading Labels
When you buy prepared and packaged foods, read the labels. You can tell the sodium content by looking at the Nutrition Facts panel of a food. Listed are the amount for sodium, in milligrams (mg), and the “% Daily Value.” Also read the ingredient list to watch for the words "soda" (referring to sodium bicarbonate, or baking soda), "sodium" and the symbol "Na" to see if the product contains sodium.

Salt and/or Sodium Descriptors
Salt Free:  Meets requirements for "sodium free."
Sodium Free: Fewer than 5 milligrams sodium per serving.
Very Low Sodium:  35 milligrams or less sodium per serving.
Low Sodium: 140 milligrams or less per serving 
Reduced Sodium:  At least 25 percent less sodium per serving.
Unsalted:  Has no salt added during processing. To use this term, the product it resembles must normally be processed with salt and the label must note that the food is not a sodium-free food if it does not meet the requirements for "sodium free".

The FDA and USDA state an individual food that has the claim "healthy" must not exceed 480 mg sodium per reference amount. "Meal type" products must not exceed 600 mg sodium per labeled serving size.

Sodium and Hypertension.
In order for a food to make an Allowable Health Claim it must contain a defined amount of nutrients. In relationship to sodium and Hypertension the amount is 140 milligrams or less sodium per serving.

American Heart Association (AHA)
The American Heart Association recommends you choose and prepare foods with little or no salt to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. Aim to eat less than 1,500 mg of sodium per day (less that 3/4 teaspoon of salt).
The AHA is working with federal agencies to identify ways to reduce the amount of sodium in the food supply. The association is encouraging food manufacturers and restaurants to reduce the amount of sodium in foods by 50 percent over a 10-year period. AHA will help Americans lower the amount of sodium they consume by the following strategies:
 1. Reduce the amount of sodium in the food supply,
 2. Make more healthy foods available (e.g., more fruits and vegetables); and
 3. Provide consumers with education and decision-making tools to make better choices.

 Tips for reducing sodium in the diet
 1.  Choose fresh, frozen or canned food items without added salts.
 2.  Select unsalted nuts or seeds, dried beans, peas and lentils.
 3.  Limit salty snacks like chips and pretzels.
 4.  Avoid adding salt and canned vegetables to homemade dishes.
 5.  Select unsalted, lower sodium, fat-free broths, bouillons or soups.
 6.  Select fat-free or low-fat milk, low-sodium, low-fat cheeses and low-fat yogurt.
 7.  Use spices and herbs to enhance the taste of your food. 
 8.  Add fresh lemon juice instead of salt to fish and vegetables.
 9.  When dining out, ask for your dish to be prepared without salt.
10. Don’t use the salt shaker. 

WHO, A global brief on hypertension

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI). National High Blood Pressure Education Program

The International Society of Hypertension (ISH). ISH's main objectives are to promote and encourage the advancement of scientific knowledge in all aspects of research and its application to prevention and management of heart disease and stroke in hypertension and related cardiovascular diseases around the world. 

The World Hypertension League (WHL). The objectives of the World Hypertension League (WHL) are to promote the detection, control and prevention of arterial hypertension in populations.

Friday, April 5, 2013

National Week of the Ocean
March 31 - April 6, 2013
The Oceans Impact on Nutrition

National Week of the Ocean is sponsored by National Week of the Ocean, Inc. in cooperation with the City of Fort Lauderdale, Florida.
The goals are to encourage ocean exploration which includes commerce, history, food sources, endangered sea creatures and issues such as offshore drilling and ocean dumping.

The health of the ocean is essential to human survival. The ocean is a major source of food, medicine, and jobs. Fish from the ocean is the primary source of protein for one in six people on earth. Protecting the ocean protects our health, our economy, and our children's future.

  National Week of the Ocean
It's Time to Start a Sea Change
The Ocean Conservancy believes it's time to look beneath
the surface to see where the health of our planet really begins.

Exploring Oceans - Disney

1. The oceans occupy nearly 71% of our planet's surface.

2. More than 97% of our entire planet's water is contained in the ocean.

3. Fish supply the greatest percentage of the world's protein consumed by humans. More than 3.5 billion people depend on the ocean for their primary source of food. In 20 years, this number could double to 7 billion.

4. Each year some 70 to 75 million tons of fish are caught in the ocean. Of this amount around 29 million tons is for human consumption.

5. Eighty per cent of all pollution in seas and oceans comes from land-based activities.

6. Death and disease caused by polluted coastal waters costs the global economy $12.8 billion (US) a year.

7. Plastic waste kills up to 1 million sea birds, 100,000 sea mammals and countless fish each year. Plastic remains in our ecosystem for years harming thousands of sea life every day.

8. Over the past decade, an average of 600,000 barrels of oil a year has been accidentally spilled from ships, the equivalent of 12 disasters the size of the sinking of the oil tanker Prestige in 2002.

9. Although coral reefs comprise less than 0.5 per cent of the ocean floor, it is estimated that more than 90 per cent of marine species are directly or indirectly dependent on them.

10. Species of fish endangered by overfishing are tuna, salmon, haddock, halibut, and cod.


Friday, March 8, 2013

March 8, International Women's Day - Nutrition Advocacy

"Each year around the world, International Women's Day (IWD) is celebrated on March 8. Thousands of events occur not just on this day but throughout March to mark the economic, political and social achievements of women. Organisations, governments, charities, educational institutions, women's groups, corporations and the media celebrate the day. Many groups around the world choose different themes each year relevant to global and local gender issues.

The 2013 theme is the "GENDER AGENDA: GAINING MOMENTUM." Over time and distance, the equal rights of women have progressed. Celebrate the achievements of women while remaining vigilant and tenacious for further sustainable change. There is global momentum for championing women's equality."         
   - United Nation International Women's Day

International Women's Day 2013:
Concern's work
Moderator: Christine Hadekal, Nutrition Advocacy Officier

Sunday, January 6, 2013

January 6,
National Bean Day

The nutrition information provided below is based on 1/2 cup cooked beans, prepared from dry beans. No salt has been added, therefore sodium levels are insignificant. Beans contain no cholesterol and a small amount of fat. Beans are a great source of fiber, high in potassium and contain many of the B vitamins. Beans also provide between 7% to 18% of one's daily iron needs.

All About Beans

The US Dry Bean Council (USDBC) is a private trade association comprised of leaders in the bean industry with the common goal of promoting the U.S. edible bean trade, both in the United States and abroad, and educating U.S. consumers about the benefits of beans. The USDBC gives a voice to the bean industry and provides information to consumers, health professionals, buyers, suppliers and the media about the good taste, nutritional value and versatility of beans.

The USDBC also is a resource for information on U.S. exporters, overseas importers, U.S. dry bean classes, trade policy issues and the role of U.S.-grown beans in international food-aid efforts. USDBC also publishes foreign language newsletters and other publications designed to help overseas importers, packagers and canners better understand and maintain contact with the U.S. dry bean exporting trade.

As part of USDBC’s mission, the organization collaborates with public health organizations, research centers, universities, and the entire supply chain, from seed suppliers to farmers, processors, wholesalers, distributors and transporters.

While the USDBC is privately funded, its representatives work closely with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) in overseas markets, and often co-sponsors activities with the U.S. Government. These activities include hosting trade missions from foreign countries to visit U.S. production and processing facilities, participating in trade shows worldwide, coordinating trade missions of U.S. exporters and growers to visit overseas markets and producing education

The USDBC is headquartered in Washington, D.C., with a marketing office in Pierre, South Dakota. In addition, USDBC representatives around the world facilitate activities and dialog between U.S. and overseas trade.

Unlike meat-based proteins, beans are naturally low in fat and are a cholesterol-free source of protein. Research shows that a diet including beans may reduce your risk of heart disease.

A nutrient-rich food, beans contain protein, complex carbohydrates, fiber, antioxidants, and important vitamins and minerals, such as folate, B-Vitamins, manganese, potassium and iron.

Folate, a vitamin very important for pregnant women and their unborn babies, is found in beans. During pregnancy, women need more folate. Expectant mothers who consume enough of the right nutrients can help reduce the risk of birth defects.

Beans are especially important for people with certain food allergies and intolerances. For example, some people can’t tolerate gluten, a natural protein present in wheat, barley and rye. Because beans don’t contain gluten, or major allergens found in various grains, substituting beans can help provide the fiber and other nutrients that people on restricted diets may be missing. Beans come in a variety of convenient forms (such as canned beans, bean flours and dehydrated beans) that can be used in place of allergenic and gluten-containing ingredients.

Bean Recipes
Black Bean Soup Garnished with
Green Onions

Black Bean Soup Garnished with Green Onions and
Reduced-fat Sour Cream Served in a Sourdough Roll News

Dietitian Blog List