Monday, December 25, 2017

Sunday, December 17, 2017

Go Fund Me - Help Build a Home for People with Special Physical Needs wanting to be Independent


Jake is my son. He was born 29 years ago. By the time he was 6 months we learned he had Cerebral Palsy. The doctor didn't give us much hope, but that night Jake looked up at me and smiled. Like most special need parents we were looking for a miracle.  As Jake grew older we learned he was a quadriplegic, but blessed with the ability to talk. All his other needs required assistance. But I promised Jake and myself we would stay together and make it. 

Before Jake was born, I completed my Doctorate Degree and worked as a College Program Director. I raised grant monies for Meals on Wheels for the elderly, disabled, and people with AIDs.

I wanted to be a great mother, but I needed to support Jake's medical needs. (Jakes' father left when he was 4 years old). I found work I could do mostly at home. For over 40 years as a single mother, I worked a full-time job and 4 part-time jobs. I paid my taxes, Medicare, and Jake's medical bills for 29 years plus.

As the years passed, I worried what would become of Jake. There was no family left and he did not want to go to a group home.

I turned our home into a Boarding House hoping to create a home for other people with special needs.

There was no money to make repairs and upgrades to the home. The medical bills came first. If I don't make the upgrades, we will be forced to move out.

I don't have much money to hire an aide,  So I had to give up my work and became Jake's caregiver. I'm in my 60's and I am trying to do my best, but it is becoming more difficult.




Please help us. We want to stay together and I would like to leave the house to Jake and other people needing assistance - giving people a sense of Independence and self-esteem would mean the world to me. 




Thank you for taking the time to read our story.

with warmest regard,
Sandy and Jake 

Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Portuguese Kale and Potato Soup, Gourmet
Nutritional Analysis Correction and Recipe Makeover



Nutritional Analysis Correction
The nutritional analysis provided used raw potatoes with the peel. Analysis provided (per serving): Calories 459, Total fat 24g, Saturated fat 6g, Cholesterol 39mg, Sodium 1468g, Carbohydrate 49g, Fiber 5g, Protein 15g

The corrected version used potatoes cooked and peeled.
Corrected Analysis (per serving)

Note: Most recipes are written based on the foods we need to purchase. However, when analyzing a recipe, foods need to be entered in the ready-to-eat form.

Modification.
The recipe makes for a hardy meal. It is an excellent source of vitamin A and vitamin C and a good source of fiber. 

With some slight adjustments we can lower the sodium, fat and calories.
    *Omit 1.25 teaspoon Salt
    *Omit the one tablespoon Oil (at the end of the recipe).

These changes will save you 35 calories; 4 grams fat; and 728 mg sodium per serving.

Nutritional Analysis Services
Ensure accurate and cost effective nutritional analysis for your recipes and menus utilizing an extensive research database. A great service for the Recipe Bloggers, Media, Cookbook Publishers, Writers, Chefs, and Recipe Websites. Your readers will enjoy and benefit from the Nutrition information.

For more information, visit Dietitians-Online Nutritional Analysis Services

contact:
Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN, LN
recipenews@gmail.com
954-796-7235

Monday, November 27, 2017

Cyber Monday Dietitians Online Store
Spread Good Health this Holiday and Every Day


Visit Dietitians-Online Store. If you are a Dietitian (RD or APD) with a published book on nutrition and/or food, Please submit the information to recipenews@gmail.com for our holiday healthy nutrition resources. 

Wednesday, October 4, 2017

October 4, National Taco Day - Taco in a Cup

Taco in a Cup

1 serving

Ingredients/Directions
Layer the following ingredients:
1 Tablespoon Guacamole
2 Tablespoon Salsa
1 Tablespoon Black Bean Dip
3 Tortilla Chip, salt free, crushed
1 Tablespoon Shredded Cheese, low fat

Nutrition Information


Sunday, August 20, 2017

Do You Know What's On Your Kitchen Sponge?


One of the most dangerous sources of virulent bacteria, including E. coli, Salmonella, Staphylococcus and others, is the kitchen sponge and 'dish cloths' in American homes.

Ways To Clean Your Kitchen Sponge or Dish Cloth

1. Wet the sponge well and microwave it on high for about 2 minutes. Be careful a dry sponge can catch on fire.

2. Wash it in the hot cycle of your washing machine and leave them there through a drying cycle.

3. Clean the sponge and sanitize it in a diluted bleach solution (1 tablespoon of bleach added to 1 gallon of water) before using a second time.

4. Replace worn sponges rather than reusing.

5. Avoid using your kitchen sponge to wipe up raw eggs, meat juice and other food items typically high in harmful bacteria. If you do use your sponge for such purposes, wash and disinfect it immediately afterward.

6. Clean your sponge after each use.


Resources.

Eat Right. Dos and Don'ts of Kitchen Sponge Safety
Home Food Safety. How Safe is Your Kitchen?

Friday, July 28, 2017

Good-bye Food Pyramid, Hello Food Plate

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is retiring the Food Pyramid and replacing it with a plate icon. The new image is expected to be revealed on Thursday, June 2, 2011.

I'm not sorry to see the food pyramid being replaced. The design presented challenges in counseling and education.

The USDA said in a statement this week that the new food icon would be "part of a comprehensive nutrition education initiative providing consumers with easy-to-understand recommendations, a new website with additional information, and other tools and resources."


The plate design will be a welcomed change. One of the advantages in using a food plate is the ability to visually demonstrate portion sizes.

 The History of Plate Sizes

Fast foods do not have a monopoly on super size. The plate industry has had its own growth spurt during the past 50 years. In the 1960's dinner plates were about 8.5 to 9-inches in diameter and held about 800 calories; by 2009 plate size had grown to 12-inches with the capacity to hold about 1900 calories. The calorie differences are illustrated in the graphic below. (Calorie amounts will vary depending on the foods you choose.)

Graphic 1


Our Eyes Can Deceive Us

Last night, I tried an experiment with my family. First each person was presented with dinner on an 8.5 inch plate. Then I removed the plates and set out the 12-inch plates. When asked which plate had more food, five out of six said the 8.5 inch plate.

The amount of food was identical, but when comparing the two sizes the participants looked to see how much food filled their plate.

                                                                   Graphic 2

This is a further illustration of the same amount of food on different plate sizes. The larger the plate, the smaller the food appeared.


Next, I wanted to see how much food the different size plates could hold.  The calorie amounts differ from graphic 1 due to the foods I used, but there was a significant increase in calories as the size of the plate grew.



Thursday, June 29, 2017

Mango, Tomato, and Green Onion Salad

 Mango, Tomato, and Green Onion Salad


Ingredients
1/3 cup Mango
1/2 cup Tomato, diced
2 Tbsp Green Onions





Nutrition Information




Mango, Tomato, and Green Onion Salad
with Breadstick



Ingredients
1/3 cup Mango
1/2 cup Tomato, diced
2 Tbsp Green Onions
1 Breadstick

Nutrition Information

Tuesday, June 20, 2017

June 20, National Vanilla Milkshake Day


   Vanilla Milkshake Makeover


       


Vanilla Milkshake, an all-time favorite does not have to be loaded with calories, fat, cholesterol and sugar.

Today’s recipe makeover transforms Paula Deen’s Vanilla Milkshake into a healthier alternative.


Vanilla Milkshake Makeover
Nutrition
Information
Paula Deen's Vanilla MilkshakeVanilla Milkshake MakeoverMakeover Savings
Calories718148570
Carbohydrates (g)732251
Total Sugars (g)731756
Fat (g) 403.536.5
Cholesterol (mg)25222230
Sodium (mg)19311083

Vanilla Milkshake (Original)
Recipe by Paula Deen
Serves 4

Ingredients
4 cups quality vanilla ice cream
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
8 tablespoons sugar
2 cups milk, less for thicker milkshakes

Directions
Using a blender or milkshake machine, blend all ingredients together until smooth. Serve in tall glasses with a straw.

Nutrition Information
Calories (kcal) 718; Carbohydrates (g) 73; Total Sugars (g) 73; 
Fat (g) 40; Cholesterol (mg) 252; Sodium (mg) 193


Vanilla Milkshake (Makeover)
Serves 4, serving size 8 ounces

Ingredients
2 cups vanilla ice cream (light, used Edy's)
1 teaspoons vanilla extract
2 cups skim milk
Artificial sweetner to taste (optional)
Crushed Ice, as needed for a thicker shake

Directions
Using a blender, blend all ingredients together until smooth. Serve in eight ounce glasses with a straw.

Nutrition Information
Calories (kcal) 148; Carbohydrates (g) 22; Total Sugars (g) 17; 
Fat (g) 3.5; Cholesterol (mg) 22; Sodium (mg) 110

Sunday, June 11, 2017

Multicultural American Child Awareness Day

Today is a wonderful day to celebrate the many cultural foods that makeup the American Cuisine. The diversity can be seen as we travel across the country. There are regional differences and the influences of immigrants from all over the world.






New England is known for seafood, particularly lobster, and a creamy clam chowder. The Southern states are known for collard greens (leafy greens), chicken and dumplings, black eyed peas and cornbread. Grits is a popular breakfast dish in the South. The Midwest has traditionally been a beef and grain producing area so meats, potatoes and breads are foods found there. In the Pacific Northwest fresh salmon is a specialty and in the Southwest, the Mexican influence can be seen. California and Hawaii are both known for growing many different fruits, and Alaska is known for its fish and King Crab.

As a nation of immigrants, our foods have expanded to include worldwide cuisines, traditions, and religious influences. Many ethnic dishes are joining the American food culture and are seeing an incredible boost in familiarity, approval and consumption.



Foods from All Over the World




Healthy Choices
Table of Cuisines (from Menu Solutions)


Cuisine
Healthier Choices
Limit
Delicatessen Selections
Extra lean corned beef, pastrami, or roast beef, beef brisket, and turkey breast are best; whole wheat or multi-grain breads; chicken or tuna salad; chopped herring; chef salad; fresh fruit plate with cottage cheese; dry bagel; borscht or broth soup; tossed salad, sliced tomatoes, beet salad, or carrot raisin salad.
High-fat meats (regular corn beef, hot pastrami, beef bologna, hot dogs, knockwurst, liverwurst, and salami); potato salad; mayonnaise based salads; combo sandwiches (Reuben); smoked fish (lox); creamy coleslaw; chopped liver; excess cream cheese and cheese spreads; sauerkraut (high in sodium).
Pizza Parlor Selections
You cannot go wrong by ordering extra toppings such as onions, peppers, mushrooms, tomato slices, broccoli and spinach. Other possibilities include chicken, crab meat, or shrimp.  
Fat starts with the basic cheese, so avoid extra cheese and in particular mozzarella. Other culprits include bacon, meatballs, pepperoni, sausage, and prosciutto, as well as anchovies.
Sandwich Shop Selections
Both 100% whole wheat and pita bread are great choices. Good sandwich fillers are grilled chicken breast, ham, roast beef, and turkey breast. Instruct the server not to add butter, margarine, or mayonnaise to the bread and substitute with ketchup, mustard, or horseradish. Good salad choices include chef, garden, or Greek salads, but remember to ask for low-calorie dressings on the side and to omit egg or cheese. Broth-type soups are good, such as barley, beef, chicken, lentil, split pea, and vegetable noodle.
Avoid croissants, cheese, excess mayonnaise, egg, and creamy soups. Beware of "diet plates" with big burgers and scoops of cottage cheese, which have loads of saturated fat. Omit cheeseburgers, cheese sandwiches, or grilled cheese "melts" over chicken and seafood salads; and cold cuts. Combo sandwiches with meat and cheese and club sandwiches are best avoided due to the large portion size.Remember that salad combos such as tuna, chicken, and crab meat have lots of mayonnaise. Avoid creamy soups such as chowders or cream of "anything."
Submarine Shop Selections
Order the smaller size roll or pita bread. Turkey, smoked turkey, ham, and roast beef are acceptable. Ask the server to go light on the meats, omit the mayonnaise or oil, and generously load up on the shredded lettuce, onion, peppers, pickles, and sliced tomatoes. Choose salads as alternatives when available, such as chef or tossed salads with perhaps a scoop of tuna, chicken, or seafood served with Italian or pita bread. 
Omit meats such as bologna, Italian cold cuts, salami (hard or Genoa) and sausages. Stay away from cheeses and steak and cheese. Other items to omit include antipasto salads, fried eggplant, and chicken cutlets.
Chinese Selections
Order plain steamed rice; boiled, steamed, or stir-fried vegetables (ask for little oil to be used); moderate fish and shellfish; non-fried tofu; skinless poultry and egg roll (insides only).
Anything fried (rice or crispy noodles), or with sweet and sour sauce; egg dishes or soups; salty soups; avoid duck and limit beef, pork and picked foods; excess soy sauce; ask chef to leave out MSG and cut down the use of commonly used corn starch, sugar, and salt.
Indian Selections
Order chutney (except mango); curry sauce (yogurt based); fish (omit butter basting); yogurt with shredded vegetables; basmati rice. Biryani (vegetable dish); chapatti or papadum bread; tandoori chicken; lentil or mulligatawny soups
Creamy or high-salt soups; clarified butter (ghee); deep fried meats; poori or paratha bread; fried samosa or pakora; ask to prepare dishes without excess salt and to omit coconut milk, if possible; omit garnishes with nuts or dried fruit.
Italian Selections
Order antipasto (no oil or excess meats); crusty bread (no oil or butter); broiled or grilled fish, seafood, chicken, and meats; garlic; plain or vegetable pasta; fresh unsalted mozzarella cheese; steamed leafy vegetables (kale and broccoli); salads; fresh tomatoes; zucchini; ices.
Garlic bread; stuffed pastas (ravioli and lasagna); fried eggplant; meatballs or sausage; sauces with butter, cream, oil, and wine base; pesto sauce; cheese-filled or parmesan style dishes; spumoni or tortoni ice cream. Beware of risotto rice; polenta; and high-fat, high-sodium prosciutto ham and pancetta; veal cutlets and Caesar salads.
Japanese Selections
Order rice; steamed fish; sushi; sashimi; miso soup; raw vegetables; tofu; sukiyaki (stir-fried); yakimono (broiled fish).
Tempura and other deep-fried food; excess peanut and teriyaki sauce; pickled foods; excess salt and sugar in sauces; excess salt in soy marinades and sauces.
Mediterranean (Middle East) Selections
Order couscous, bulgar, and pita bread; legumes such as chickpeas, fava beans, and lentils; hummus; grape leaves; yogurt.
Phyllo dough dishes for sweet desserts such as baklava; feta and kasseri cheese; excess anchovies and olives; high sodium foods; feta, olives and sausage; appetizers in general, except salads; excess fat from butter, olive oil, omelet's and tahini.
Mexican Selections
Order soft-shell tacos; burritos; fajitas; salsa; chicken enchilada; black beans or Mexican rice; grilled fish or chicken; salads without chips or shells; moderate corn or flour tortilla, using minimal oil; cerviche (marinated fish); gazpacho; chile con carne soup, with no cheese. Acceptable items include shredded lettuce; spicy meats; diced tomatoes; salsa verde; picante or tomato sauce; use Mexican salads as appetizers, with salsa as the dressing.
Chips, nachos; super nachos; chili con queso; fried taco or tortilla shells; guacamole; sour cream; cheese; refried beans; beef and pork dishes; olives; items such as chilies rellenos, chimichangas, chorizo (sausage), and flautas.
Thai Selections
Order steamed rice; broth-based soups (tom yum koang and pok taek); non-fried proteins, such as chicken, seafood, and tofu; vegetables; satay or steamed mussels; salads with light dressings, made with Thai spices.
Excess sodium; soy sauce and sugar; MSG; coconut milk, coconut oil; cream dishes, high milk and sodium soups; many fried appetizers; curry or curry sauce; fried eggplant; cashew and peanut toppings.

Resources
1. Multicultural American Child Awareness Day


Monday, May 22, 2017

May 22, International Day for Biological Diversity


The United Nations proclaimed May 22 The International Day for Biological Diversity (IDB).  

The theme has been chosen to coincide with the observance of 2017 as the International Year of Sustainable Tourism for Development as proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly in its Resolution 70/193 and for which the United Nations World Tourism Organization is providing leadership.

Biodiversity, at the level of species and ecosystems, provides an important foundation for many aspects of tourism. Recognition of the great importance to tourism economies of attractive landscapes and a rich biodiversity underpins the political and economic case for biodiversity conservation. Many issues addressed under the Convention on Biological Diversity directly affect the tourism sector. A well-managed tourist sector can contribute significantly to reducing threats to, and maintain or increase, key wildlife populations and biodiversity values through tourism revenue.

For many coastal communities, the survival of marine and coastal ecosystems and biodiversity is essential to their nutritional, spiritual, societal and religious well-being. But even for the many millions of people who may not think that they have any strong reliance on the ocean, marine ecosystems and wildlife provide all kinds of benefits. Many coastal environments provide protection for those farther inland from the ravages of the sea. Coral reefs buffer land from waves and storms and prevent beach erosion. Dune systems on beaches stabilize shorelines from erosion and encroachment. Mangroves, mudflats and deltas trap sediment, preventing the land behind it from sliding ever-seaward.


The ocean world is in all our daily lives. For example, sponges from the Mediterranean have been used for painting, cooking, cleaning and even contraception for at least 5,000 years. Substances derived from seaweeds stabilize and thicken creams, sauces, and pastes, are mixed into paint and used to make paper and even in skin lotion and toothpaste.

Many marine plants and animals also contain a multitude of substances already being used, or identified as being of potential use, in medicines. Each of the 700 known species of cone snail produces a unique cocktail of 100 to 200 toxins, some of which have already been developed into pain killers: one, which has been on the market since 2004, is more than 100 times more powerful than morphine. A 2010 study predicted the existence of between 250,000 and close to 600,000 chemicals in the marine environment, approximately 92 percent of which remained undiscovered; those chemicals, the study’s authors estimated, might yield up to 214 new anti-cancer drugs, worth anywhere from US $563 billion to $5.69 trillion.


Most importantly of all, tiny marine plants called phytoplankton produce energy, like plants on land, through photosynthesis. As a result of that photosynthesis, they release oxygen. In fact, phytoplankton release half of all oxygen in the atmosphere.



Under the Sea

International Day for Biological Diversity 2017

Friday, May 19, 2017

Food Revolution Day

Food Revolution Day is fighting to put compulsory practical food education on the school curriculum.

With diet-related diseases rising at an alarming rate, it has never been more important to educate children about food, where it comes from and how it affects their bodies.


It’s about celebrating the importance of cooking good food from scratch and raising awareness of how it impacts our health and happiness – we believe that everyone should know about food and it starts with getting kids food smart, making cooking fun and inspiring a love of food that will last a lifetime. Food Revolution Day is a campaign by the Jamie Oliver Food Foundation in the UK and USA, and The Good Foundation in Australia. 


Jamie Olive's Big Bet on Food Education




Who is taking part?
Food Revolution Day is open to anybody, whether you’re a school, organisation or individual.

Many activities are organised by supporters in their local area or voluntary Food Revolution ambassadors who champion food knowledge and cooking skills in their communities.

Why have a day of action?
Learning about food and how to cook from scratch is one of the most valuable skills a child can ever learn.

This knowledge used to be passed down from generation to generation, but now, with an over reliance on unhealthy convenience foods, millions of people lack the confidence and even the most basic skills to cook for themselves and their families. By educating children about food in a fun and engaging way, we’re equipping them and future generations with the skills they need to live healthier lives.

National Bike to Work Day and National Bicycle Month


May, National Bicycle Month, sponsored by the League of American Bicyclists.

MissionTo promote bicycling for fun, fitness and transportation and work through advocacy and education for a bicycle-friendly America.

History. The League was founded as the League of American Wheelmen in 1880. Bicyclists, known then as "wheelmen", were challenged by rutted roads of gravel and dirt and faced antagonism from horsemen, wagon drivers, and pedestrians.

In an effort to improve riding conditions, more than 100,000 cyclists from across the United States joined the League to advocate for paved roads. The success of the League in its first advocacy efforts ultimately led to our national highway system.

Benefits of Bike Riding
People ride bicycles for all sorts of reasons, from better health, to saving money on fuel, and helping the environment. In addition, bike riding is a lot of fun.


Bike Safety - Introduction to Bike Safety 
and Sharing the Road


Danger Rangers Bike Safety PSA


Food Art: Bicycle Built for Two
The song "Bicycle Built for Two" was written in 1892.
The American bicycle history spans over 100 years.


Resource
The League provides education for cyclists, including bicycle safety.To learn more about the League of American Bicyclists, visit their website at http://www.bikeleague.org. 

Friday, April 7, 2017

April 7, World Health Day 2017: Depression Let's Talk



World Health Day is celebrated on 7 April. The 2017 theme of the World Health Organization (WHO) is focused on Depression: Let's Talk.  Depression is the leading cause of ill health and disability worldwide. According to the latest estimates from WHO, more than 300 million people are now living with depression, an increase of more than 18% between 2005 and 2015. Lack of support for people with mental disorders, coupled with a fear of stigma, prevent many from accessing the treatment they need to live healthy, productive lives.

 World Health Day 2017 - WHO: Depression - Let's Talk




One of the first steps is to address issues around prejudice and discrimination. “The continuing stigma associated with mental illness was the reason why we decided to name our campaign Depression: let’s talk,” said Dr Shekhar Saxena, Director of the Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse at WHO. “For someone living with depression, talking to a person they trust is often the first step towards treatment and recovery.”

Associated Health Risks

WHO has identified strong links between depression and other noncommunicable disorders and diseases. Depression increases the risk of substance use disorders and diseases such as diabetes and heart disease; the opposite is also true, meaning that people with these other conditions have a higher risk of depression.

Depression is also an important risk factor for suicide, which claims hundreds of thousands of lives each year. Said Dr Saxena: “A better understanding of depression and how it can be treated, while essential, is just the beginning. What needs to follow is sustained scale-up of mental health services accessible to everyone, even the most remote populations in the world.”

Depression is a common mental illness characterized by persistent sadness and a loss of interest in activities that people normally enjoy, accompanied by an inability to carry out daily activities, for 14 days or longer.


In addition, people with depression normally have several of the following: a loss of energy; a change in appetite; sleeping more or less; anxiety; reduced concentration; indecisiveness; restlessness; feelings of worthlessness, guilt, or hopelessness; and thoughts of self-harm or suicide.

Resources 

Nutrition.gov News

Dietitian Blog List