Wednesday, February 28, 2018

National Nutrition Month
Go Further with Food

National Nutrition Month® 2018 is a nutrition education and information campaign created annually in March by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The campaign focuses attention on the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits.

2018 NNM Theme - "Go Further with Food". The foods you choose can make a real difference. Preparing your foods to go further, by planning meals and snacks in advance can also help to reduce food loss and waste. This year's theme for National Nutrition Month® encourages us to achieve the numerous benefits healthy eating habits offer, but it also urges us to find ways to cut back on food waste. Learning how to manage food resources at home will help you "Go Further with Food" while saving both nutrients and money. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics https://www.eatright.org/



National Tooth Fairy Day
Nutrition and Your Child's Dental Health


Healthy teeth are important to your child's overall health. From the time your child is born, there are things you can do to promote healthy teeth and prevent cavities. For babies, you should clean teeth with a soft, clean cloth or baby's toothbrush. Avoid putting the baby to bed with a bottle and check teeth regularly for spots or stains.

For all children, you should
1. Start using a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste when they are two years old. You might start sooner, if a dentist or doctor suggests it.
2. Provide healthy foods and limit sweet snacks and drinks
3. Schedule regular dental check-ups

Forming good habits at a young age can help your child have healthy teeth for life.






Resources
1. WebMD. Nutrition and Your Child's Teeth
2. Canadian Dental Association, Nutrition for Children
3. National Institute of Health, Child DentalHealth



National Eating Disorders Awareness Week - Resources and Support


National Eating Disorders Awareness Week (NEDAwareness Week) is an annual campaign to bring public attention to the critical needs of people with eating disorders and their families. This year’s theme is It’s Time to Talk About It and we’re encouraging everyone to get screened.

It’s time we take eating disorders seriously as public health concerns. It’s time we bust the myths and get the facts. It’s time to celebrate recovery and the heroes who make it possible. It’s time to take action and fight for change. It’s time to shatter the stigma and increase access to care. It’s Time to Talk About It!

Eating disorders have the highest mortality rate of any mental disorder and 30 million Americans will suffer from an eating disorder at some point in their life.

“Eating disorders can hide in plain sight and frequently go undiagnosed until someone’s health is at significant risk. These are life-threatening bio-psycho-social illnesses, not a ‘lifestyle choice.’ It’s time to get beyond the stigma and stereotypes and recognize the diverse experiences of people affected by disordered eating," said Claire Mysko, interim CEO of NEDA. "Early intervention is a critical first step toward ending this epidemic, and everyone who is struggling deserves to be able to access help without delay to provide them the best chance possible of full recovery."

Get involved today!


Mission 
“The aim of NEDAwareness Week is to increase outreach and awareness of eating disorders and body image issues while reducing the stigma surrounding eating disorders and improving access to treatment resources. Eating disorders are serious, life-threatening illnesses - not choices - and it's important to recognize the pressures, attitudes and behaviors that shape the disorder.”

NEDAwareness Week is committed to raising awareness of eating disorders. The goal of outreach efforts leads to a greater chance of people seeking out resources and help for an eating disorder - which saves lives.

How You Can Help

NEDA provides resources to help raise awareness and provide accurate information about eating disorders. Visit the NEDAwareness Week website for numerous ways to get involved.

Tweet About It

§ Eating disorders aren’t just about food- they can also be about stress, depression & perfectionism, but there is hope and help. myneda.org

§ You are not alone. #NEDAwareness

§ Skipping meals, hating your body & obsessing about food are signs of disordered eating, call 800-931-2237 to talk about it

§ Do constant thoughts about food & exercise interfere w/ your life? It could be an eating disorder. Call 800-931-2237 to talk about it

§ 35% of dieters develop disordered eating. If you’re worried about yourself or a friend, call 800-931-2237 to get help

§ Not ready to talk about it? Chat about it with NEDA Click to Chat option. Visit Find Help @myneda.org

§ Eating Disorders don’t discriminate, they affect all ages, sexes, ethnicities, races and every socio-economic status- You are not alone.

§ Early intervention for an eating disorder could save your life. Don’t wait to get help- find out more @myneda.org or call 800-931-2237

§ For #NEDAwareness cultivate body appreciation! What has your body done for you lately? Take a moment to say thanks

Facebook Posts

§ People don’t choose to get an eating disorder, but you can choose to get help. Recovery is possible. This week is National Eating Disorders Awareness week: Go to www.nationaleatingdisorders.org or call 1-800-931-2237 to find help and information.

§ Not ready to talk about it? Try NEDA’s new Click to Chat feature. Visit the Find Help & Support section on www.nationaleatingdisorders.org to let someone know what you are feeling.

§ Constantly thinking about calories, exercise and your weight are signs of disordered eating. If you’re concerned about yourself or a loved one call 1-800-931-2237 or visit www.nationaleatingdisorders.org for more information.

§ It’s National Eating Disorders Awareness Week. Anorexia, Bulimia, and Binge Eating Disorder are serious mental illnesses but recovery is possible. Visit www.nationaleatingdisorders.org for more information or to find an event near you!

§ Everybody Knows Somebody affected by an eating disorder- whether it’s a friend, partner, family member or you’ve suffered. If you’re worried about an eating disorder, talk to someone you care about or call 1-800-931-2237 for help and information. Visit www.nationaleatingdisorders.org to learn how to help a friend.

§ Did you know over half of the people diagnosed with an eating disorder have an “eating disorder not otherwise specified” (ENDOS)? This means most people struggling don’t exactly fit into the categories of Anorexia Nervosa or Bulimia Nervosa but may still have some symptoms of each, or may be struggling with Binge Eating Disorder.

§ Weighing yourself frequently, feeling out of control with food, and feeling like you have to work-out to “burn” calories could be signs of an eating disorder. Millions of men and women struggle with disordered eating but help is available. Call 1-800-931-2237 or visit: www.nationaleatingdisorders.org for more information.


Eating disorders cut across socioeconomic lines and affect people at all stages of life. This talk focuses on how eating disorders are diagnosed, their prevalence, and current treatments.


Warning Signs and Symptoms of an Eating Disorder


Resources and Support
National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) provides education, resources, and support for those individuals and families affected by eating disorders, and serves to prevent, cure and access quality care. NEDA sponsors events, programs and research on eating disorders, and contains a section on its site featuring recent news articles and information.

NEDA TOOLKIT for Educators

Academy for Eating Disorders (AED). The Academy for Eating Disorders aims to provide comprehensive information on the facts of eating disorders, treatment plans, and education to prevent others from developing eating disorders.

Alliance of Eating Disorders Awareness was created as a source of community outreach, education, awareness, and prevention of the various eating disorders. Their goal is to spread the message, recovery from these disorders is possible, and individuals should not have to suffer or recover alone.

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Provides nutrition resources about eating disorders, including an extensive nutrition reading list.

Obesity Society is the leading scientific society dedicated to the study of obesity. They are committed to encouraging research on the causes and treatment of obesity, and to keeping the medical community and public informed of new advances. AOA provides obesity awareness and prevention information.

Binge Eating Disorder Association (BEDA) is the national organization focusing on increased prevention, diagnosis, and treatment for Binge Eating Disorder.

BodyImageHealth.org introduces a model for a healthy body image and provides a variety of resources to help children and adults develop a positive body image, effective eating habits, nutritional health, fitness, and weight.

Council on Size and Weight Discrimination, Inc. An activist group influencing public opinion and policy through education, information and networking.

Eating Disorders Anonymous (EDA). A 12 step self-help fellowship for anorexics and bulimics. EDA offers membership to any person who needs help recovering from an eating disorder. The site has meetings around the United States, publications, recovery information, EDA news and helpful links to other sites.

Eating Disorders Coalition. The goal of Eating Disorders Coalition is to "advance the federal recognition of eating disorders as a public health priority." The nonprofit organization lists the federal policy on its website, congressional briefings, events, information/resources on eating disorders and a blog.

Eating Disorders Information Network (EDIN) is a nonprofit organization committed to the prevention of all types of disordered eating, from obesity to anorexia, and the promotion of positive body-esteem through education, outreach and action.

Eating Disorder Referral and Information Center (EDRIC) includes links to sites which provide additional information on eating disorders and related topics.

Eating Disorders Resource Center (EDRC) is a non-profit organization that links resources, information and support for eating disorders in Silicon Valley. The mission of EDRC is to increase awareness and understanding of eating disorders for the general public and health professionals; to promote early diagnosis, effective treatment, and recovery; and to advocate for mental health legislation and effective insurance coverage. EDRC offers a comprehensive, online resource directory.

F.E.A.S.T. Families Empowered and Supporting Treatment of Eating Disorders is an international organization providing support to families and friends of those suffering from eating disorders. The site announces events and conferences, groups around the world, treatment providers, online caregivers and current news.

Green Mountain at Fox Run - Women’s Center for Binge & Emotional Eating:
Bingeing and emotional eating are much more common in our culture than you might think, and the symptoms are often unrecognized. Weight becomes the primary focus when it shouldn’t be. Now there’s a place created to help this growing problem, and the results are liberating.

International Association of Eating Disorders Professionals (IAEDP) is well recognized for its excellence in providing education and training standards to an international multidisciplinary group of various healthcare treatment providers and helping professions, who treat the full spectrum of eating disorder problems.

Kristen Watt Foundation provides support for those suffering from eating disorders. The site has sections for parents, friends, and coaches. They are dedicated to increasing awareness of eating disorders, education, and treatment.

Multi-Service Eating Disorders Association (MEDA) is a nonprofit organization working to prevent and treat eating disorders. Their aim is to do this through early detection and increased public awareness. This site has events listed, resources and a place for individuals to join the organization.

National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD) seeks to alleviate the problems of eating disorders by educating the public and healthcare professionals, encouraging research, and sharing resources on all aspects of these disorders. Their website includes information on finding support groups, referrals, treatment centers, advocacy and background on eating disorders.

National Association for Males with Eating Disorders, Inc. (N.A.M.E.D.) is dedicated to offering support to and public awareness about males with eating disorders.

National Institute of Mental Health: Eating Disorders provides information on anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge-eating disorder, the effect eating disorders can have on men, treatment options and helpful resources and links.

Perfect Illusions. Discover what an eating disorder is, find help and resources, and look into the lives of several individuals and their families who are struggling with the consequences of anorexia and bulimia.

The Renfrew Center. Residential treatment facility specializing in eating disorders (anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorders) and related mental health issues. The Renfrew Center is a women's mental health center with locations in Philadelphia and Radnor, Pennsylvania; Coconut Creek, Florida; New York City; Old Greenwich, Connecticut; Ridgewood, New Jersey; Charlotte, North Carolina, Nashville, TN, Dallas, TX, and Bethesda, MD.

Womenshealth.gov The National Women's Health Information Center is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The site has information on body image, cosmetic surgery, eating disorders, and a list of links to various informational websites.

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

February, Potato Lovers Month
Nutrition and Recipes


Nutrition, Recipes and Politics


Potatoes are a good source of vitamin C, vitamin B6, potassium, manganese, and dietary fiber. A baked potato is a healthy food choice and contains no fat, saturated fat and cholesterol.


The potato’s reputation as being fattening is related to the method of preparation, such as greasy French fries; and the addition of butter, sour cream, cheese and bacon.


Below are some heart healthy recipes, prepared by the 
Idaho Potato Commission.


Idaho® Potato Crusted Pizza Gluten Free

Estimated Nutritional Analysis per Serving:
(Omit the salt and use a low sodium broth to lower the sodium content)
250 calories, 25 mg cholesterol, 660 mg sodium,
11 g protein, 14 g fat, 25 g carbohydrates (Based upon 6 - 8 servings)

Heart-Healthy Grilled Idaho® Potato Ratatouille Salad

Estimated Nutritional Analysis per Serving:
Based on 8 servings

210 calories, 0 mg cholesterol, 6 g fat,
25 mg sodium, 
6 g protein




Resources
Idaho Potato Commission
National Potato Council




Monday, February 26, 2018

February 26, World Pistachio Day
Health Benefits

Pistachios were introduced in the United States in the 1930s. Today, California produces more than 400 million pounds of pistachios each year making it a leading producer of pistachios worldwide. Each pistachio tree averages around 50 kg of seeds, or around 50,000, every two years.




Pistachios Offer Multiple
Health Benefits

Pistachio nuts, eaten as part of a healthy diet, can increase the levels of antioxidants in the blood of adults with high cholesterol, according to Penny Kris-Etherton, Penn State professor of nutrition, along with an international team of nutritional scientists. Previous research has shown that pistachios also lower lipids and lipoproteins, which benefits heart health.




To learn more about the Pistachio, visit the following links:
Website. Pistachio Health

Sunday, February 25, 2018

National Nutrition Month,
“Eat Right, Your Way, Every Day”

I enjoy playing with words and seeing if I can come up with a meaningful world that goes with the National Nutrition Month® Theme, “Eat Right, Your Way, Every Day.”

With some juggling and creativity, here is what I came up with.


National Nutrition Month® (NNM) is more than a game; it is a "nutrition education and information campaign created annually by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (Academy). The campaign focuses attention on the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits." 




What does "Eat Right, 
Your Way, Every Day" Mean?








National Nutrition Month, Preview

March is National Nutrition Month® (NNM), a nutrition education and information campaign created annually by the American Dietetic Association (ADA). The campaign focuses attention on the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits. The March 2011 theme for National Nutrition Month® is "Eat Right with Color."



The theme explores the health benefits associated with eating foods of many colors. "Eating a rainbow" refers to including color diversity in your meals and food choices, so as to enhance your intake of a wide range of nutrients. During the month of March, we will explore the colors of foods and their benefits.

Red and Pink Foods
Hosts: Robert (Red) and Pam (Pink)
Apples, Beets, Cayenne, Cherries, Cranberries, Guava, Kidney Beans, Papaya, Pink Beans, Pink/Red Grapefruit, Pomegranates, Radicchio, Radishes, Raspberries, Red Bell Peppers, Red Cabbages, Red Chili Peppers, Red Corn, Red Currants, Red Grapes, Red Onions, Red Pears, Red Peppers, Red Plums, Red Potatoes, Red Tomatoes, Rhubarb, Strawberries, Tomatoes, Watermelons

Green Foods
Host: Grace (Green)
Alfalfa, Artichokes, Arugula, Asparagus, Avocado, Bok Choy, Broccoli, Broccoli rabe, Brussels Sprouts, Celery, Chives, Collard Greens, Cucumbers, Dandelion Greens, Edamame, Endive, Fennel, Green apples, Green Beans, Green cabbage, Green Grapes, Green Olives, Green Onion, Green Pears, Green Peas, Green Pepper, Green Tomatoes, Honeydew, Kale, Kiwi, Leeks, Lettuce, Limes, Mint, Okra, Oregano, Parsley, Pistachios, Snow Peas, Spinach, Sugar snap peas, Swiss Chard, Tarragon, Tomatillo, Wasabi, Watercress, Zucchini

Blue and Purple Foods
Hosts: Brooke (Blue); Betty (Light Blue); and Peggy (Purple)
Blue Grapes, Blue and Purple Potatoes, Blueberries, Dried Plums, Plums, Eggplant, Pomegranates, Elderberries, Juniper Berries, Kelp (Seaweed), Purple Belgian Endive, Purple Cabbage, Purple Figs

Yellow and Orange Foods
Hosts: Yoko (Yellow), York (Yellow) and Oliver (Orange)
Apricots, Bananas, Butternut Squash, Cantaloupe, Carrots, Cheddar Cheese, Citrus Fruits, Clementines, Coriander, Corn, Creamsicle, Dill, Garbanzo Beans, Golden Apples, Golden Flax Seed, Golden Raisins, Grapefruit, Honey, Lemon, Lemongrass, Mandarin Oranges, Mangoes, Nectarines, Orange Jello, Orange Peppers, Orange Tomatoes, Oranges, Papaya, Parsnips, Peaches, Pears, Persimmons, Pineapple, Pumpkin, Rutabagas, Saffron, Salmon, Spaghetti Squash, Squash Blossoms, Sweet Corn, Sweet Potatoes, Tangerines, Whole Grains, Yams, Yellow Apples, Yellow Beans, Yellow Peppers, Yellow Summer Squash, Yellow Wax Beans

White and Black Foods
Hosts: Wendy (White) and Brian (Black)
White: Cauliflower, Coconut, Garlic, Ginger, Green Onions, Scallions, Horseradish, Jicama, Kohlrabi, Leeks, Millet, Mushrooms, Onions, Parsnips, Quinoa, Shallots, Soy Products, Sunflower Seeds, Tofu, Turnips, White Beans, White Corn, White Sesame Seeds

Black: Black Beans, Black Cherries, Black Currants, Black Mushrooms, Black Olives, Black Quinoa, Black Raspberry, Black Rice, Black Sesame Seeds, Black Soybeans, Blackberries, Boysenberries, Prunes, Raisins, Seaweeds, Tamari (Soy Sauce)


My staff and I started the project in September 2010, when ADA announced the theme. Over the next five months, we would take over 600 photographs of colorful foods in order to create the March presentation for NNM. Many of the photographs are available for purchase with the proceeds going to special need young adults. Contact Dr. Sandra Frank for additional information (recipenews@gmail.com).

National Clam Chowder Day

Many regional variations of Clam Chowder exist. The two most common are New England or "white" clam chowder and Rhode Island / Manhattan or "red" clam chowder.







New England Clam Chowder
Cooking Light







Friday, February 23, 2018

February 23, International Dog Biscuit Appreciation Day
5 Dog Treat Recipes That Kids Can Make



Recipes
Animals, 5 Dog Treat Recipes That Kids Can Make
1. Banana Bites

2. Buckwheat Bone Biscuits
3. Carob Cookies
4. Beefy Birthday Cake
5. Pea-Nutty Nibbles

We tried the Buckwheat Bone Biscuits and it was a success. The recipe made about 45 biscuits. The nutrient analysis for one biscuit is below.


Nutrient Analysis Services
Purchasing nutrient analysis software and learning how to use the program is only useful if you have the knowledge to convert “as purchased” ingredients to the “edible portion.” Ensure accurate nutrient analysis for your recipes utilizing an extensive research database and over 25 years experience. A valuable service for the Recipe Blogger, Media, Cookbook Publishers, Writers, Chefs, and Recipe Websites. Your readers will benefit from the Nutrient information and a Registered Dietitian. Contact: Dietitians-Online.com; Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN, LN, FAND at recipenews@gmail.com




Thursday, February 22, 2018

National Chili Day - Chili with Gorgonzola Cheese

Chili with Gorgonzola Cheese

Ingredients/Directions
1 cup Chili with Beans
1 Tablespoon Gorgonzola Cheese

Heat chili. Top with cheese.


Nutritional Analysis Services

Ensure accurate and cost effective nutritional analysis for your recipes and menus utilizing an extensive research database. A great service for the Media, Cookbook Publishers, Writers, Chefs, Recipe Websites and Blogs. Your readers will enjoy and benefit from the Nutrition information.

For more information, visit Dietitians-Online Nutritional Analysis Services

contact:
Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN, LN
recipenews@gmail.com
954-796-7235


Wednesday, February 21, 2018

February is Fabulous Florida Strawberry Month


To highlight this beautiful and delicious fruit, the Florida Strawberry Growers Association has created a series of educational resources, starring Jammer, the Strawberry.

Jammer the Strawberry and Nutrition



Jammer's Strawberry Fashion Show




Florida Strawberry Food Handling Tips
from Strawberry Sue



In 1982, the Florida Strawberry Growers Association (FSGA) was officially formed. This organization became a voice for Florida strawberry growers. The mission for the handful of farmers was to become "partners in research, promotion and member/community service”.

FSGA is a non-profit organization located in the city of Dover, which is a part of Hillsborough County, Florida. It is the parent company of the Florida Strawberry Patent Service and the Florida Strawberry Research and Education Foundation.

Over the years, the growers have formed a voluntary organization representing over 8,000 acres of berries. Hillsborough County, Florida produces about 15 percent of the nation’s strawberries and virtually all the berries are grown during the winter. The 18 million flats produced each year, if placed end to end, would extend from Plant City, Florida to Seattle, Washington and back again.

Hillsborough County, Florida is recognized as the "Winter Strawberry Capital of the World and the home of some of the sweetest, reddest and juiciest strawberries around."

Strawberry Sue is the home of the FSGA blog. Sue Harrell, known affectionately as Strawberry Sue, is FSGA’s director of marketing, seasoned strawberry grower and the voice of the blog.  Sue will keep you informed and inspired. You’ll find helpful strawberry-related links, year-round news from the fields, special events and easy to prepare strawberry recipes.

Strawberry Sue demonstrates how to make an Edible Strawberry Bouquet
(not just for Valentine's Day)

Visit the FSGA website for additional information, including research, educational resources, recipes, events and contact information.

Recipes
Healthy Strawberry Recipes and Tips. EatingWell has a selection of fresh and delicious strawberry recipes, such as





                                                      Arugula and Strawberry Salad






Tuesday, February 20, 2018

National Cherry Month - Health Benefits, Selection, Storage, and Recipes

About seventy percent of the cherries produced in the United States come from Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Utah. There are two main types of cherries: sweet and sour. Sour cherries are lower in calories and higher in vitamin C and beta-carotene than sweet cherries.




Selection
Select firm, red cherries with stems attached. Avoid soft, shriveled or blemished cherries. Good cherries should be large (one inch or more in diameter), glossy, plump, hard and dark-colored for their variety. Avoid fruit that is bruised or has cuts on the dark surface.

How to Store
Refrigerate cherries for up to 10 days.

Nutrition Benefits
Fat free; saturated fat free; sodium free; cholesterol free; good source of vitamin C; good source of potassium.


Health Benefits

Cancer
Sweet cherries have several cancer-preventive components including fiber, vitamin C, carotenoids and anthocyanins. The potential role of sweet cherries in cancer prevention lies mostly in the anthocyanin content, especially in cyanidin. Sweet cherries are a good source of cyanidins, which appear to act as an antioxidant and may reduce cancer risk.


Cardiovascular Disease
Sweet cherries have been shown to have significant levels of anthocyanins as well as other pigments in perhaps smaller concentrations that together provide synergistic effects thought to be protective to heart and related vascular tissue

Diabetes
Researchers are interested in the role of anthocyanins in reducing insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. The lower glycemic response shown in relation to cherry consumption may be the result of glucose-lowering effects of cherry phytochemicals in combination with the fiber content of cherries.


Potassium
Sweet cherries are considered a good source of dietary potassium, with approximately 260 mg potassium for every cup of fresh cherries consumed. Adequate potassium intake has shown to reduce the risk for hypertension and stroke.

Quercetin
Sweet cherries also contain a small amount of quercetin. Quercetin is an antioxidant which may play a beneficial role in reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease, hypertension and cancer.

Melatonin
Cherries are one plant food source of melatonin. Melatonin is a hormone that plays a role in promoting healthy sleep patterns.

Ease muscle soreness
Researchers believe tart cherries’ antioxidants protect against exercise-induced free radicals, which can lead to painful inflammation.

Gout
Cherries may help reduce the swelling, inflammation and tenderness associated with gout. Research reveals eating about 2 cups fresh sweet Bing cherries daily lowered uric acid levels by 15%.


Recipes

1. EatingWell, Healthy Cherry Recipes
2. Health, 20 Cherry Recipes for Dessert, Dinner, and More
3. Better Homes and Gardens, Healthy Cherry Recipes
4. The Greatest Table: 5 Healthy Cherry Recipes from Around the Web

Resources
1. National Cherry Growers & Industries Foundation, Cherry Facts
2. Fruits & Veggies - More Matters, Cherries & Heart Health


Monday, February 19, 2018

President's Day - Dietary Preferences of Some of Our Presidents

Every president has his favorite foods. And it doesn't take long for the nation to become captivated with a president's eating habits - with Ronald Reagan, it was jelly beans; Jimmy Carter munched peanuts; and George W. Bush loved pretzels.




Reference

Sunday, February 18, 2018

February 18, Crab Stuffed Flounder Day



Serves 6

Ingredients
6, 4 oz fresh flounder fillets
1/2 cup(s) celery, chopped
1/2 cup(s) chopped green onions
1 clove(s) minced garlic
4 Tbsp unsalted butter, divided
1/2 cup breadcrumbs
1 cup fresh crab meat
2 tablespoon(s) chopped parsley
1 egg, slightly beaten
Salt, black and red pepper to taste

Directions
1. Sauté celery, onions, and garlic in 2 Tbsp of melted butter.
2. Add breadcrumbs, crabmeat chopped parsley and egg to sautéed vegetables. Mix well.
3. Season to taste with salt, black and red pepper.
4. Brush the flounder fillets well with additional melted butter, salt, and pepper the fillets.
5. Laying the fillets flat, place an equal amount of prepared stuffing on each fillet.
6. Roll the fillets ensuring that the stuffing mixture remains in the center.
7. Melt remaining 2 Tbsp of butter in shallow baking dish.
8. Place stuffed fish in a pan.
9. Cover and bake at 375 F for approximately 30 minutes or until the fish flakes easily.
10. Remove cover and bake additional 5 minutes to brown.

Nutrient Analysis



Nutrient Analysis Services

Purchasing nutrient analysis software and learning how to use the program is only useful if you have the knowledge to convert “as purchased” ingredients to the “edible portion.” 
Ensure accurate nutrient analysis for your recipes utilizing an extensive research database and over 25 years experience. A valuable service for the Recipe Blogger, Media, Cookbook Publishers, Writers, Chefs, and Recipe Websites. Your readers will benefit from the Nutrient information and a Registered Dietitian. Contact: Dietitians-Online.com; Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN, LN, FAND at recipenews@gmail.com





Saturday, February 17, 2018

February is National Grapefruit Month
Food and Drug Interactions

Grapefruits come in many varieties. The most popular assortments are red, white, and pink colors. The flavors range from bitter to sweet and tart. The grapefruit was introduced to Florida in the 1820s. Today, most grapefruits are still grown in Florida.
 

Grapefruit is an excellent source of many nutrients and phytochemicals that contribute to a healthy diet. Grapefruit is a good source of vitamin C, which helps support the immune system. It also contains the fiber pectin, and the pink and red colors contain antioxidant lycopene.Lycopene appears to have properties that help fight oxygen free radicals, which are compounds that can damage cells. Studies have shown grapefruits help lower cholesterol, and there is evidence that the seeds have antioxidant properties. 

Storage. If you plan on using grapefruits withing a week, store them at room temperature. If you are planning on using them after a week, store grapefruits in the refrigerator crisper where they will keep fresh for two to three weeks.





Grapefruit Active Lifestyle Meal Plan


Preparing Grapefruits 

1. Grapefruits should be rinsed under cool water before consuming. The peel may contain dirt or bacteria that may reside on the skin's surface.
2. Grapefruits are usually eaten fresh by slicing the fruit horizontally and scooping out sections of the halves with a spoon.
3. To separate the flesh from the membrane you can cut it with a sharp knife, a special curved-blade grapefruit knife, or a serrated grapefruit spoon.
4. If there are seeds, you can remove them with your spoon before you eat the grapefruit.
5. Grapefruits can be peeled with your hands or with a knife. If using a knife, start at the top, make a vertical incision that runs downward and then back up to the top on the other side and then repeat so that there will be four sections of similar size. Be careful to only cut through skin and not into the membrane. The skin can then be peeled back with your hands or with the knife.


The Best Way to Cut a Grapefruit


Grapefruit Juice Has Serious Side Effects With Certain Medications







References: 
1. Wikipedia. Grapefruit 
2. The World’s Healthiest Foods: Grapefruit.

Friday, February 16, 2018

National Family Caregivers Day

Feberuary 16 is National Family Caregivers Day and we're celebrating caregivers everywhere. What caregivers do every day requires super powers, and though we may not tell them often enough – the care they give matters to all of us.




We know you're focused on the health and well-being of others, but it's important to remember to take care of you. Caring for yourself isn't selfish; it's an essential part of making sure you can give your best every day.

Staying strong as a caregiver

*Stay healthy with proper nutrition

*Eating healthy is the best way to maintain your strength, energy, stamina, and immune system. It's also one of the most powerful things you can do to stay positive.

*Good nutrition for your care receiver helps make care easier

*
Up to half of all older adults are at risk for malnutrition, that's why it's important to make sure those you care for have a healthy diet. It helps prevent muscle loss, supports Rest. Recharge. Respite.

*Make sure to take some time away to re-energize or ask for help. Caregiving can be stressful, and taking a breather ensures that you'll be ready to take on the challenges Find out if you and your care receiver are getting the right amount of nutrients. Complete this nutrition assessment and see how you are doing.


10 Tips for Family Caregivers


  1. Seek support from other caregivers.  You are not alone!
  2. Take care of your own health so that you can be strong enough to take care of your loved one.
  3. Accept offers of help and suggest specific things people can do to help you.
  4. Learn how to communicate effectively with doctors.
  5. Caregiving is hard work so take respite breaks often.
  6. Watch out for signs of depression and don't delay getting professional help when you need it.
  7. Be open to new technologies that can help you care for your loved one.
  8. Organize medical information so it's up to date and easy to find.
  9. Make sure legal documents are in order.
  10. Give yourself credit for doing the best you can in one of the toughest jobs there is!





Nutrition.gov News

Dietitian Blog List