Saturday, December 15, 2018

Guest Blogger: Michelle Stewart, RD
Seven Foods and Five Drinks for a Very Merry Gluten-Free Holiday



7 Foods for a Very Merry Gluten-Free Holiday
1. Sugar cookies and Gingerbread men (made with GF flours: rice flour, potato starch, tapioca flour, and xanthan gum) 

  • Gluten-Free Flour Blend: To make flour blend, combine 2 cups rice flour, 2/3 cup potato starch, 1/3 cup tapioca flour and 1 teaspoon xanthan gum. Use appropria amount for recipe; store remainder in container with tight-fitting lid. Stir before using. 
2. Glazed Ham (toss out the glaze and make your own gluten-free glaze)

3. Quinoa, mushroom, or wild rice stuffing instead of traditional turkey stuffing

4. Meringue Cookies

5. Gravies thickened with cornstarch instead of flour

6. Gumbo with gluten-free Roux (made with sorghum flour instead of all-purpose flour)

7. Corn Bread (avoid store-bought mixes, and make it gluten free at home with gluten-free flour blend and gluten-free baking soda)
  • To make flour blend: combine 2 cups rice flour, 2/3 cup potato starch, 1/3 cup tapioca flour and 1 teaspoon xanthan gum. Use appropriate amount for recipe; store remainder in container with tight-fitting lid. Stir before using. 

5 Festive Gluten-Free Cocktails:
1. Homemade eggnog (warm or chilled)
2. Spiked Apple Cider
3. Rum Hot Toddy
4. Pomasa (Pomegranete juice and Champagne)
5. White Sangria


**Other alcohols that contain gluten:
Beer
Malted beverages

Guest Blogger: Michelle Stewart, MPH, RD, LD/N, CDE 

Michelle J. Stewart is a Registered and Licensed Dietitian and better known as The Nutrition Planner. Founder of Michelle Stewart Consulting & Associates who has been leading the way to a healthier you for more than 25 years. She is zealous when it comes to wellness from the inside out and empowering whomever she comes in contact with to take charge of their health and wellbeing. It is all about balance and moderation, her motto is “EAT LESS MOVE MORE”. Michelle is a Certified Diabetes Educator, and also holds certifications in Adult, Adolescent, and Childhood Obesity and is a Certified Wellness Coach. A Master’s In Public Health keeps her abreast of the latest health concerns and on the cutting edge of intervention. Focusing on aging and longevity with a holistic approach to living your best life is her pathway to inner peace and happiness.

An experienced and dynamic public speaker who specializes in the African American community, Ms. Stewart has participated in countless seminars and workshops all over the country. She was a panelist on health care topics at the African American Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C. where former Vice President Dick Cheney was the keynote speaker and the Healthy Breakfast keynote speaker at the annual National Newspapers Publishers Association convention in Chicago. 

Celebrating Thirty Years Providing Nutritional Analysis for the Media and Cookbook Publishers
Why use a dietitian for nutritional analysis?


This December marks 30 years working in the area of nutrition analysis for the media, cookbook publishers, recipe bloggers, and websites. It has been an exciting journey and an amazing learning experience. I have worked with creative and dynamic editors, chefs, and writers from such publications as Bon Appetit, Sun-Sentinel (Tribune), Atlanta Constitution, Detroit Freepress, and the Fort Worth Star

In 1986 while working on my doctorate degree, I had the opportunity to conduct an independent study on nutrient analysis software. Those were the days when the operating system was DOS and the monitor was black and green. The purpose was to evaluate the pros and cons of nutrient analysis software. I learned early on recipes are written based on foods as purchased (AP) and in order to obtain a more accurate analysis the foods needed to be converted to the form an individual will consume; this is known as the edible portion (EP). The most accurate nutritional analysis is done in a laboratory and can be costly.

As I explored the Internet, I found numerous recipes without nutrition information, but even worse there were many recipes with inaccurate data. (Here is an example of a recipe I found with wrong information.)

Nutrition information is part of our everyday life. There are millions of people who depend on nutrition information to meet their dietary needs. Some of the diets include low calorie, carbohydrate controlled, high protein, low protein, low fat, low cholesterol, low sodium, high fiber, gluten-free, lactose-free, and peanut allergies.

Why use a dietitian for nutritional analysis?

  • Recipes are usually written based on what the consumer needs to purchase. The individual analyzing the recipe must evaluate the recipe based on the actual food ready-to-eat (unless the food is meant to be eaten whole.)
  • A nutritional analysis program cannot cook or prepare meals. A person must have skills in Food Science, Culinary Arts, Nutrition, Cooking and Preparation Techniques, Purchasing Guides, Yield Factors, and Nutrient Analysis Software. Have you ever wondered how to analyze the following in a recipe? What foods would you choose from the database?

  1. A marinade you discard
  2. The salt when preparing pasta
  3. A pinch or handful
  4. 3 lb Chicken, directions: cook and remove skin and bone 
  5. Breading
  6. Apple, cored and peeled
  7. Alcohol in a heated dish

  • To own professional nutrition software with yearly maintenance fees can be expensive. In addition, there is the cost of an educated person to run the software. Updates are vital in our fast-paced food industry with changing government regulations.
Consider adding nutritional analysis to your online recipes. A great service for the Recipe Blogger, Media, Cookbook Publishers, Writers, Chefs, and Recipe Websites. Your readers will benefit from the Nutrition information and a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist.

Take a short quiz to see if you have the knowledge and skills necessary to analyze a recipe? 


Looking for nutrition analysis for your recipes?  With over thirty years of industry experience, I offer my services below market value in order to meet income criteria for continued health benefits.  This allows me to work from home and care for my disabled son.


Contact Sandra Frank, EdD., RDN, LD, FAND at recipenews@gmail.com from Dietitians-Online.

From "As Purchased to "Edible Portion" How to Analyze a Recipe Using a Nutrient Database. Purchasing nutrient analysis software and learning how to use the program is only useful if you have the knowledge to convert “as purchased” ingredients to the “edible portion.” This book describes how to read a recipe and enter the correct ingredients and amounts, in order to provide an accurate nutrient analysis. The book is an essential tool for anyone working in nutrient analysis. Recipes are usually written based on what the consumer needs to purchase. The individual analyzing the recipe must evaluate the recipe based on the actual food-ready-to-eat (unless the food is meant to be eaten whole.) A nutritional analysis program cannot cook or prepare meals. A person must have skills in Food Science, Culinary Arts, Nutrition, Cooking and Preparation Techniques, Purchasing Guides, Yield Factors, and Nutrient Analysis Software.







December 15, National Cupcake Day
A Special Blueberry Cupcake

Blueberry Cupcakes



Ingredients
Cupcakes
1 large white potato, peeled and cut into small chunks
3/4 cup whole-wheat pastry flour
3/4 cup cake flour
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
3/4 cup granulated sugar
1/4 cup canola oil
1 large egg
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/2 cup nonfat buttermilk
1 cup blueberries, fresh, plus fresh blueberries for garnish

Frosting
3/4 cup granulated sugar
3 tablespoons water
4 teaspoons dried egg whites (equivalent to 2 egg whites)
1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar
Pinch of salt
2 tablespoons blueberry preserves or jam
1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract


Directions
Cupcakes
1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Line 12 (1/2-cup) muffin cups with paper liners.
2. 
Place potato in a saucepan, add water to cover and bring to a boil. Cook until tender, 8 to 10 minutes. Drain and mash until very smooth. Measure out 3/4 cup and let cool slightly. 
3. Whisk whole-wheat flour, cake flour, baking powder, baking soda and 1/2 teaspoon salt in a medium bowl.
4. Beat granulated sugar and oil in a large mixing bowl with an electric mixer on medium speed until combined. Beat in egg, 1/2 teaspoon extract and the 3/4 cup mashed potatoes until combined. 
5. With the mixer on low, alternately mix in the dry ingredients and buttermilk, starting and ending with dry ingredients and scraping the sides of the bowl as needed, until just combined. 
6. Fold in 1 cup blueberries. Divide the batter among the prepared cups. 
7. Bake the cupcakes until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean, 22 to 24 minutes. Transfer to a wire rack and let cool completely.
Frosting
1. Once the cupcakes are cool, bring 2 inches of water to a simmer in the bottom of a double boiler. 
2. Combine 3/4 cup granulated sugar and 3 tablespoons water in the top of the double boiler. Place over the simmering water and heat, stirring, until the sugar is melted, 2 to 3 minutes. Start beating the mixture with an electric mixer on high speed.
3. Add reconstituted egg whites, cream of tartar and a pinch of salt. Continue beating until the mixture looks like a shiny, thick frosting, 5 to 7 minutes.
4. Off the heat, beat for 1 minute more to cool.
5. Add 2 tablespoons blueberry preserves (or jam) and 1/4 teaspoon extract and beat on low just to combine.
5. Spread or pipe the frosting on the cooled cupcakes and decorate with fresh blueberries on top

                       
Nutrition Information 



Food Groups: 1 fruit, 2.25 Starch/Bread


Ensure accurate nutritional analysis for your recipes utilizing an extensive research database and over 25 years experience. A great service for the Recipe Blogger, Media, Cookbook Publishers, Writers, Chefs, and Recipe Websites. Your readers will benefit from the Nutrition information and a Registered Dietitian. Contact: Dietitians-Online.com; Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN, LN at recipenews@gmail.com

Friday, December 14, 2018

Celebrating Alabama's Birthday and Fried Green Tomatoes


Alabama was admitted as the 22nd state on December 14, 1819. Alabama's agricultural outputs include poultry and eggs, cattle, fish, plant nursery items, peanuts, cotton, grains such as corn and sorghum, vegetables, milk, soybeans, and peaches. Although known as "The Cotton State", Alabama ranks between eighth and tenth in national in cotton production.

The fried green tomatoes in Alabama are legendary in their own right, and hundreds of slices are dished out daily throughout the state. Other popular foods include fried catfish, country fried steak, fried dill pickles, fried okra, fried chicken, and fried apple pies.



The fried green tomatoes in Alabama are legendary.

Fried Green Tomatoes, yields: 6 servings



Ingredients
½ cup yellow cornmeal
3/4 teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon freshly ground pepper 4 medium green tomatoes, cut into ¼-inch slices 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil, divided


Directions
1. Preheat oven to 450°F.
2. Combine cornmeal, salt, and pepper in a medium bowl. Dredge tomato slices in cornmeal.
3. Brush 1½ teaspoons oil over the bottom of a 12-inch cast-iron or other ovenproof skillets.
4. Heat skillet over medium-high heat until very hot.
5. Add half the tomato slices to the skillet in a single layer and cook until browned on one side, about 3 minutes.
6. Turn slices over and transfer skillet to oven.
7. Bake tomatoes for 9 minutes or until golden and tender. Transfer to a platter and tent with foil to keep warm. Wipe out the skillet and repeat with remaining 1½ teaspoons oil and remaining tomato slices.
8. Serve hot.








December 14, National Bouillabaisse Day, A Traditional Fish Stew

Bouillabaisse is a traditional fish stew originating in Provence. Commonly used vegetables include leeks, onions, tomatoes, celery and potatoes. The vegetables are simmered together with the broth and served with the fish. What makes a bouillabaisse different from other fish soups is the selection of herbs and spices in the broth and the way the fish are added one at a time, in a certain order, and brought to a boil.


Bouillabaisse
Serves 6 (about 3 cups each)

Ingredients
8 cups water
3 (1 1/4-pound) whole lobsters
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 cups chopped onion
2 cups coarsely chopped celery
1 1/2 cups coarsely chopped carrot
4 garlic cloves, minced
4 cups coarsely chopped tomato (about 1 1/2 pounds)
1/2 teaspoon saffron threads, crushed
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
2 bay leaves
1 pound skinned halibut fillets, cut into 2-inch pieces
22 small clams, scrubbed
30 small mussels, scrubbed and debearded
1/2 pound medium shrimp, peeled and deveined

Directions

1. Using an 8 quart stockpot bring water to a boil.
2. Plunge lobsters headfirst into water. Return to a boil; cover, reduce heat, and simmer 12 minutes.
3. Remove lobsters from water (do not drain); cool. Remove meat from cooked lobster tails and claws; cut into 1-inch pieces, reserving shells.
4. Cover and refrigerate lobster meat.
5. Return reserved shells to water; bring to a boil. Reduce heat, and simmer 5 minutes. Drain through a colander over a large bowl, reserving broth; discard shells. Wipe pan dry with a paper towel.
6. Heat oil in pan over medium-high heat. Add onion, celery, carrot, and garlic; sauté 5 minutes.
7. Add reserved broth, tomato, saffron, thyme, pepper, and bay leaves; bring to a boil. 
8. Reduce heat, and simmer 15 minutes. Discard bay leaves.
9. Bring to a boil; add halibut, reduce heat, and simmer 4 minutes. 
10. Add clams; cook 1 minute. 
11. Add mussels; cook 2 minutes. 
12. Add shrimp; cook 3 minutes. Bring to a boil. 
13. Add reserved lobster meat; cook until thoroughly heated. 
14. Discard unopened shells.

Nutritional Information


Ensure accurate nutritional analysis for your recipes utilizing an extensive research database and over 25 years experience. A great service for the Recipe Blogger, Media, Cookbook Publishers, Writers, Chefs, and Recipe Websites. Your readers will benefit from the Nutrition information and a Registered Dietitian. Contact: Dietitians-Online.com; Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN, LN, FAND at recipenews@gmail.com

Thursday, December 13, 2018

December 13, National Cocoa Day

Save Calories and Fat by using Skim (Nonfat) Milk, 
instead of Whole Milk. You still receive the
benefits of the calcium and vitamin D.
Skim /NonFat Milk
90 Calories
0 g Fat;
250 mg Calcium
124 IU / 3.2 mcg Vitamin D
Whole Milk
149 Calories
8 g Fat;
276 mg Calcium
124 IU / 3.2 mcg Vitamin D


The Polar Express, "Hot Chocolate Song" 






Wednesday, December 12, 2018

December 12, Gingerbread House Day
with a Healthier Look


Jake and I made this gingerbread house with peanut butter, raspberries, blueberries,
dried apricots and yogurt covered raisins. It's alright to snack on the decorations.

Jake and I also made a Hanukkah Gingerbread House.






The Gingerbread House is decorated with Fresh and Dried Fruits, Nuts, Vegetables, Peanut Butter and Low Fat Cottage Cheese. Peanut Butter will take the place of the icing traditionally used. The cottage cheese and cauliflower will be the snow and a wonderful dip when you are ready to serve.

Before you get started, remember to wash your hands. Also, we need to wash the fresh fruits and vegetables.
When making the gingerbread house, leave any perishable items in the refrigerator until you are ready to use them; that includes the cheese and fresh fruits and vegetables.

Have fun and be creative.

Tuesday, December 11, 2018

December 11, UNICEF is Founded
Providing Children Worldwide with
Food, Clothing and Health Care


UNICEF  was created on December 11, 1946 by the United Nations to provide children with food, clothing and health care. UNICEF believes nurturing and caring for children are the cornerstones of human progress. UNICEF is active in more than 190 countries and territories through country programs and National Committees.

History of UNICEF
Sir Roger Moore narrates a brief history of UNICEF, telling the story of a small UN agency founded to bring relief to the children in countries torn apart by WWII to the global force for health, education, and child protection it is today.

 


UNICEF Facts

Poverty contributes to malnutrition, which in turn is a contributing factor in over half of the under-five deaths in developing countries. Some 300 million children go to bed hungry every day. Of these only eight per cent are victims of famine or other emergency situations. More than 90 per cent are suffering long-term malnourishment and micronutrient deficiency. (State of the World’s Children, UNICEF, 2005)

In all developing regions, children in rural areas and children from poor households are more likely to be underweight due to lack of nutrition. (Progress for Children, UNICEF, 2010)

884 million people lack access to improved drinking water sources, and 84 per cent of them live in rural areas. (Progress for Children, UNICEF, 2010)



In wake of the floods, malnutrition threatens
thousands of children in Pakistan


Shop the UNICEF store and help children in need.
Every UNICEF card and gift you buy supports the efforts
to save children’s lives around the world.

UNICEF: "Let's Heal the World"
Young people from different nationalities across the globe
are sending a message of peace and hope through music, 
as part of a UNICEF partnership with Limkokwing University 
of Creative Technology to help create a world fit for children. 


Monday, December 10, 2018

December 10, Human Rights Day
Providing Nourishment is a Human Right


Human Rights Day presents an opportunity, every year, to celebrate human rights, highlight a specific issue, and advocate for the full enjoyment of all human rights by everyone everywhere.

"Upholding human rights is in the interest of all. Respect for human rights advances well-being for every individual, stability for every society, and harmony for our interconnected world" -- United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon


This year, Human Rights Day calls on everyone to stand up for someone's rights! Disrespect for basic human rights continues to be wide-spread in all parts of the globe. Extremist movements subject people to horrific violence. Messages of intolerance and hatred prey on our fears. Humane values are under attack.

We must reaffirm our common humanity. Wherever we are, we can make a real difference. In the street, in school, at work, in public transport; in the voting booth, on social media.

The time for this is now. “We the peoples” can take a stand for rights. And together, we can take a stand for more humanity.

It starts with each of us. Step forward and defend the rights of a refugee or migrant, a person with disabilities, an LGBT person, a woman, a child, indigenous peoples, a minority group, or anyone else at risk of discrimination or violence.


Imagine - Human Rights

(1) Everyone has the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and well-being of himself and of his family, including food, clothing, housing and medical care and necessary social services, and the right to security in the event of unemployment, sickness, disability, widowhood, old age or other lack of livelihood in circumstances beyond his control. 


(2) Motherhood and childhood are entitled to special care and assistance. All children, whether born in or out of wedlock, shall enjoy the same social protection.



  

Sunday, December 9, 2018

December, Celebrate Root Vegetables: Carrots

Carrots
The carrot is a root vegetable, usually orange in color, though purple, red, white, and yellow varieties are available. It has a crisp texture when fresh. Carrots add sweetness and color to stews, soups, stir-fries, slaws, and cakes, plus an excellent source of Vitamin A and good source of fiber.



Nutritional Information

Carrots are known for their rich supply of the antioxidant, beta-carotene. Research has focused on the health benefits in the areas of vision, cardiovascular disease, and cancer.



Green Giant - Create your own veggie house http://bit.ly/2QpCrnz


Recipe: Carrot Ginger Bisque
Yield: 6 servings
Serving Size: about 1 cup

Ingredients
2 cup Vegetable Broth, low sodium
1.5 cup Carrots, diced
1/4 cup Cranberries, dried, sweetened
1 box (17.6 oz) Cashew Carrot Ginger Bisque, Pacific Natural Foods
3/4 cup White Beans, unsalted, drained

Directions
Heat the vegetable broth. Add diced carrots and dried cranberries. Simmer until carrots and cranberries are tender. Using a strainer separate the carrots and cranberries from the broth. Reserve carrots and cranberries.

Combine the broth and "Cashew Carrot Ginger Bisque". Heat over medium heat until hot, stirring occasionally. Add the white beans and reserved carrots and cranberries. Mix and reheat to serving temperature.

Notes. I used a low sodium vegetable broth to lower the sodium content of the Cashew Carrot Ginger Bisque. To increase the fiber content, I garnished the recipe with white beans, diced carrots, and dried cranberries.

Nutrition Information

Growing Carrots: Red, Yellow, Purple & Orange




Selection.
Carrots should be firm, smooth, crisp, fresh, deep in color, and free of cuts.

Storage.
Remove tops of carrots. Store in the refrigerator up to two weeks in a plastic bag.

Serving Ideas.
1. Add shredded raw carrots to salads.
2. Add carrots to soup or puree carrots to make a carrot soup.
3. Combine cooked carrots with dried fruit
4. Snack with a low-fat dip or plain.


Resources
1. Fruits & Veggies More Matters: Carrots
2. 
The World's Healthiest Foods: Carrots
3. WebMD: 
5 Healthy Facts About Carrots

Ensure accurate nutritional analysis for your recipes utilizing an extensive 
research database and over 25 years experience. A great service for the Recipe Blogger, Media, Cookbook Publishers, Writers, Chefs, and Recipe Websites. Your readers will benefit from the Nutrition information and a Registered Dietitian. Contact: Dietitians-Online.com; Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN, LN at recipenews@gmail.com 


Saturday, December 8, 2018

National Stress-Free Family Holiday Month
Tips for Coping with Holiday Stress and Depression


18 tips for coping with holiday stress and depression:

1.       Make realistic expectations for the holiday season.
2.       Set realistic goals for yourself.
3.       Do not take on more responsibilities than you can handle. Pace yourself.
4.       Make a list and prioritize the important activities. This can help make holiday tasks
     more manageable.
5.       Be realistic about what you can and cannot do.
6.       Do not put all your energy into just one day. The holiday cheer can be spread from
     one holiday event to the next.
7.       Live and enjoy the present. Look to the future with optimism.
8.       Don't set yourself up for disappointment and sadness by comparing today with the
    good old days of the past.
9.      If you are lonely, try volunteering some time to help others.
10.   Find holiday activities that are free, such as looking at holiday decorations, going
   window shopping without buying, and watching the winter weather, whether it's a
   snowflake or a raindrop.
11.   Limit your drinking, since excessive drinking will only increase your feelings of
  depression.
12.   Try something new. Celebrate the holidays in a new way.
13.   Spend time with supportive and caring people.
14.   Reach out and make new friends.
15.   Make time to contact a long-lost friend or relative and spread some holiday cheer.
16.   Make time for yourself!
17.   Let others share the responsibilities of holiday tasks.
18.   Keep track of your holiday spending. Overspending can lead to depression when the bills arrive after the holidays are over. Extra bills with little budget to pay them can lead to further stress and depression.


Resource
1. Holiday Stress and Depression, WebMD   http://wb.md/2kw3Lh7

Gingerbread Decorating Day - Healthy Gingerbread House Ideas

#GingerbreadDecoratingDay - Healthy Gingerbread House Ideas  http://bit.ly/2B53Fr2




Gingerbread House Ingredients


Hanukkah Gingerbread House
How-To Guide to Hanukkah Gingerbread House http://bit.ly/2RKlII6

December 8, National Brownie Day
Comparing the Brands

The chocolate brownie is either fudge or cake like, depending on their density. They may include nuts, frosting, whipped cream, chocolate chips, fruits or other ingredients.
Comparing the Brands

Recipe Resources










Friday, December 7, 2018

December 7, National Cotton Candy Day - The Secrets of Sugar

Cotton candy (also known as candy floss) is a form of spun sugar. A typical serving on a stick is approximately 1 ounce/30 grams. Cotton candy contains sugar and often food coloring. This type of food is known as a concentrated sweet or empty calories. One serving is equivalent to about 13 sugar cubes.



Nutrition Information

An educated consumer has the ability to make wise food choices.

The Secrets of Sugar - CBC News




Thursday, December 6, 2018

December 6, National Gazpacho Day
Gazpacho with Feta Cheese and Tabouli Salad

Recipe: Gazpacho with Feta Cheese and Tabouli Salad

Serves 8

Ingredients 
2-1/2 cups peeled and diced (1/4 inch) hothouse cucumber 
2-1/2 cups diced red and green bell pepper 
2-1/2 cups diced ripe tomato 
1/2 cup diced red and white onion 
2 cups tomato juice, low sodium 
1/4 cup red-wine vinegar 
2 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil 
1 dash Tabasco sauce
Garnish
4 Tbsp Feta Cheese
1/2 cup Tabouli Salad

 
Directions 
1. Place all of the vegetables in a large bowl. Add the tomato juice, vinegar, oil, and Tabasco. Toss.
2. Transfer half of the mixture to a blender or food processor and pulse on and off until coarsely puree. 
3. Return puree mixture to the bowl and stir to combine. Refrigerate for 5 to 6 hours before serving.
4. Combine Feta cheese and Tabouli Salad.
5. Top Gazpacho with 1-1/2 Tablespoon of Feta Cheese and Tabouli Salad



Nutrition Information

Ensure accurate nutritional analysis for your recipes utilizing an extensive research database and over 25 years experience. A great service for the Recipe Blogger, Media, Cookbook Publishers, Writers, Chefs, and Recipe Websites. Your readers will benefit from the Nutrition information and a Registered Dietitian. Contact: Dietitians-Online.com; Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN, LN at recipenews@gmail.com

Nutrition.gov News

Dietitian Blog List