Saturday, January 20, 2018

January 20, National Cheese Lover's Day

National Cheese Lover's Day


Resource

Cheese.com - World's Greatest Cheese Resource
Find over 600 specialty cheeses from 53 countries in the world's greatest cheese resource.  

Cheese is nutritious food made mostly from the milk of cows but also other mammals, including sheep, goats, buffalo, reindeer, camels and yaks. Around 4000 years ago people started to breed animals and process their milk. That's when the cheese was born.

Explore this site to find out about different kinds of cheeses from around the world.

You can search the database of 606 cheeses by names, by country of origin, by kind of milk that is used to produce it, or by texture. 










Friday, January 19, 2018

January 19, National Popcorn Day

Popcorn, also known as popping corn, is a type of corn that expands from the kernel and puffs up when heated. Popcorn is able to pop because its kernels have a hard moisture-sealed hull and a dense starchy interior. Pressure builds inside the kernel, and a small explosion (or "pop") is the end result. Some strains of corn are now cultivated specifically as popping corns. From Wikipedia



How Popcorn is Made








Thursday, January 18, 2018

Winnie the Pooh Day and a Look at Honey


Honey
from Wikipedia
Honey is a sweet food made by bees using nectar from flowers. Honey bees transform nectar into honey by a process of regurgitation and evaporation. They store it as a primary food source in wax honeycombs inside the beehive.

Honey gets its sweetness from the monosaccharides fructose and glucose and has approximately the same relative sweetness as granulated sugar.

It has exception chemical properties for baking and a distinctive flavor leading some people to prefer it over sugar and other sweeteners. Honey sometimes contains dormant endospores of the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. Because of the natural presence of botulinum endospores in honey, children under one year of age should not be given honey.

Honey has a long history in human consumption and is used in various foods and beverages as a sweetener and flavoring. It also has a role in religion and symbolism. Flavors of honey vary based on the nectar source, and various types and grades of honey are available. via GIPHY

How Honey is Made




Wednesday, January 17, 2018

January 17, Celebrating Spinach and Popeye's Debut


Nutrition Information
Spinach is fat free; saturated fat free; cholesterol free; low calorie; high in dietary fiber; high in vitamin A; high in vitamin C; high in iron, high in folate; and a good source of magnesium.

Selecting and Storing Spinach 
1. Choose fresh, crisp, green bunches with no evidence of insect damage.
2. Store spinach loosely wrapped in a damp paper towel.
3. Refrigerate in a plastic bag and use within 3 to 5 days.



Oxalic acid and Spinach

The oxalic acid in spinach binds with iron, which inhibits iron absorption. You can improve the absorption of iron from spinach by eating it with foods that enhance iron absorption; such as foods rich in vitamin C.

Serving Suggestions
1. Add spinach to a pasta or rice recipe.
2. Enjoy a spinach salad with a variety of ingredients.




References

1. Spinach - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
2. Top 10 ways to enjoy Spinach, Fruits and Veggies more matters 
3. Spinach: Nutrition . Selection . Storage
Fruits and Veggies more matters 



Monday, January 15, 2018

National Hot Pastrami Sandwich Day


Ingredients
2 slices Rye Bread
1 tsp Mustard
Lettuce leaf
2 slices Tomatoes
oz Pastrami
1/2 oz Swiss Cheese

Directions
1. Top one sliced of
 Rye Bread with mustard, lettuce, tomato, pastrami and Swiss cheese.
2. Top with second slice of rye bread.

3. Heat in oven or toaster oven until Swiss cheese melts.


Notes
The sandwich is high in saturated fat and sodium. Balance the rest of your day by choosing foods low in sodium and saturated fat. An educated consumer has the ability to make wise food choices.


Nutritional Information









National Sunday Supper Day

Isabel Laessig, a mom of four who operates the Family Foodie website, created the Sunday supper movement. It aims at bringing families back together in the kitchen and around the dinner table. To celebrate, prepare and eat a meal with loved ones.

In 2012 Laessig and eight other bloggers and their families celebrated the first virtual Sunday Supper. Sunday Supper Day falls on the second Sunday in January.

Family meal time is an ageless tradition shared by people all around the world. Eating dinner together keeps the doors of communication open. It's a perfect time to show your children they are your priority. Studies have shown children who eat dinner with their families are less likely to use alcohol, tobacco and illegal drugs and more likely to develop good eating habits.
 


Family Dinner
Segment from World Report, April 2009
A family study conducted by Brigham Young University, quizzed more than 1500 IBM employees. The results show that families who spend time eating dinner together will encounter less conflict between family and work.

The BYU study appeared in issues of Family and Consumer Sciences Research Journal, The Wall Street Journal, U.S. News and World Report and Slate magazine. Dr. Jacob expressed the hope for society to value dinner time, and not allow things to interrupt it.

In fact, a multi-national study cited by the marriage and family therapy program at the University of Minnesota and its director, reports family meal time has a more positive influence on emotional and intellectual development in children and teens than sports or additional time in school.

Nutritious Meals for Families on a Budget


Resource
Kids Eat Right, Make Sunday Dinner a Family Affair, Jill Weisenberger, MS, RDN, CDE, FAND






Saturday, January 13, 2018

Korean American Day - Celebrate Korean Foods

Korean cuisine has evolved through centuries of social and political change. Originating from ancient agricultural and nomadic traditions in the Korean peninsula and southern Manchuria, Korean cuisine has evolved through a complex interaction of the natural environment and different cultural trends.

Korean cuisine is largely based on rice, vegetables, and meats. Traditional Korean meals are noted for the number of side dishes that accompany steam-cooked short-grain rice. Kimchi is served at nearly every meal. Commonly used ingredients include sesame oil, doenjang (fermented bean paste), soy sauce, salt, garlic, ginger, pepper flakes, gochujang (fermented red chili paste) and napa cabbage.

Ingredients and dishes vary by province. Many regional dishes have become national, and dishes that were once regional have proliferated in different variations across the country. Korean royal court cuisine once brought all of the unique regional specialties together for the royal family. Foods are regulated by Korean cultural etiquette.








January 13, National Peach Melba Day

Peach Melba is a dessert of peaches and raspberry sauce with vanilla ice cream. The dish was invented in the 1890's by the French chef Auguste Escoffier at the Savoy Hotel, London, to honor the Australian soprano Nellie Melba.



Recipe.: Peach Melba
  • Makes: 2 servings
  • Serving Size: 1/2 peach, 1 tsp. jam topping, 1/4 cup ice cream
  • Preparation Time: 10 minutes
  • Cooking Time: 10 minutes

Ingredients

1 1/2cupswater
1/4cupsugar
2tsp.fresh lemon juice
1/4tsp.pure vanilla extract
1med.peach, peeled, halved, and pitted
2tsp.no-sugar-added raspberry jam
1/2cupsugar-free, reduced-fat, Vanilla Ice Cream 

Directions


  1. In a small saucepan, bring the water and sugar to boiling. Add the lemon juice and vanilla. Reduce the heat to low. Add the peach halves to the syrup and cook for 7 minutes. Remove the saucepan from the heat, and allow the peach halves to cool in the syrup for 30 minutes.
  2. Using a slotted spoon, place the peach halves in dessert dishes. Cut into slices, if desired. Heat the jam in a microwave-safe container for 15 seconds, until melted.
  3. Top the peach slices with scoops of the ice cream, drizzle with the jam, and garnish with fresh raspberries.

In 1892, Nellie Melba was performing in Wagner's opera Lohengrin at Covent Garden. The Duke of Orléans gave a dinner party to celebrate her triumph. For the occasion, Escoffier created a new dessert, and to display it, he used an ice sculpture of a swan, which is featured in the opera. The swan carried peaches which rested on a bed of vanilla ice cream and which were topped with spun sugar. In 1900 Escoffier created a new version of the dessert. For the occasion of the opening of the Carlton Hotel, where he was head chef, Escoffier omitted the ice swan and topped the peaches with raspberry purée. Other versions of this dessert use pears, apricots, or strawberries instead of peaches and/or use raspberry sauce or melted red currant jelly instead of raspberry purée.

Resources.
1. Wikipedia. 
Peach Melba
2. Food Network. Peach Melba, Recipe courtesy of Nigella Lawson

Friday, January 12, 2018

January 12, National Marzipan Day

Don’t let this basket of fruit fool you. The shapes are made with marzipan. Marzipan is a confection consisting primarily of sugar or honey and almond meal.












Contact: Dietitians-Online.com;
Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN, LN at
recipenews@gmail.com




National Curried Chicken Day



Yield: Serves 4 (serving size: 1/2 cup rice and 3/4 cup chicken mixture)

Ingredients:

1 pound skinless, boneless chicken breasts, cut into 1-inch pieces
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt, divided
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 tablespoon canola oil, divided
1 1/2 cups vertically sliced onion
2 teaspoons minced peeled fresh ginger
3 garlic cloves, minced
2 teaspoons curry powder
1 cup canned light coconut milk
2 teaspoons fresh lime juice
1/2 tsp. peppercorns, crushed
2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro or basil
2 cups hot cooked brown rice


Directions:
1. Sprinkle chicken with 1/4 teaspoon salt and 1/4 teaspoon ground pepper. Heat 1 1/2 teaspoons oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high. Add chicken to pan; cook, stirring frequently, 5 to 6 minutes or until chicken is lightly browned and almost cooked through. Remove chicken from pan.

2. 
Reduce heat to medium. Add remaining 1 1/2 teaspoons oil to pan; swirl to coat. Add onion; cook 4 minutes or until tender, stirring occasionally. Add ginger and garlic; cook until softened, about 1 minute. Add curry powder; cook 15 to 30 seconds or until fragrant, stirring constantly. Stir in coconut milk, lime juice, and crushed peppercorns.  Cover, and cook over medium-low until sauce is slightly thickened and chicken is done about 5 minutes. Remove from heat; stir in cilantro or basil. Serve over rice.


Reference
1. Black Pepper-Curry Chicken Sauté, Cooking Light

Thursday, January 11, 2018

National Folic Acid Awareness Week


The National Council on Folic Acid (NCFA).
The mission of the National Council on Folic Acid (NCFA) is to improve health by promoting the benefits and consumption of folic acid. Adequate folic acid intake is important for the prevention of birth defects. 

Healthy Food Choices for Folic Acid



Messages Folic Acid Awareness Week
wants all women 

of childbearing age to know.

1. Folic acid is a vitamin that can help prevent birth defects. Women of childbearing age need an extra 400 micrograms (mcg) of folic acid each day.

2. Women can get the recommended 400 mcg of folic acid by taking a daily multivitamin or by eating fortified foods. Check the label of your cereal to see if it has 100% DV (daily value) of folic acid.

3. Important growth of the baby happens very early in pregnancy, before most women know that they are pregnant. Folic acid can prevent birth defects of the baby’s brain or spine if a woman takes it before and during pregnancy.

4. If you are pregnant, remember to take a prenatal vitamin with iron and folic acid every day.



Nutritional Habits 
Although all enriched cereals and grain products in the U.S. are fortified with the B-vitamin folic acid, only one-third of U.S. women of childbearing age consume the recommended amount from their diet. Taking a multivitamin with folic acid every day is a key way that women can get the recommended amount of 400 mcg.
Be Prepared Before Pregnancy 
Women need folic acid, even if not planning to become pregnant, since 50% of all pregnancies are unplanned. Taking folic acid before pregnancy reduces the risk of birth defects of the brain and spine, called neural tube defects (NTDs), by up to 70%.
Message to the Hispanic Community 
Hispanic babies are 1.5 to 2 times more likely than others in the U.S. to be born with an NTD. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that Latinas in the U.S. consume the least amount of folic acid and have the least knowledge about folic acid among racial or ethnic groups.





Not only is this a father 
with a beautiful song, 
but he has an important message 
about folic acid and Birth Defects.

January 11, National Milk Day

A day to celebrate the health benefits of milk and the dairy farmers who produce it.

Every Age Needs the Nutrients Found in Dairy


Nutrition and Health

Milk plays a critical role in the diets of adults and children by providing essential nutrients. Drinking one cup of milk can help you meet the Dietary Guidelines for Americans’ recommended three servings of low-fat or fat-free milk or milk products per day.

One cup (8-ounce) serving of milk provides the following nutrients: (Information based on one cup fat-free white milk)

Calcium, provides 30% of the Daily Value. Calcium helps build and maintain bones and teeth. It plays a role in nerve function, muscle contraction and blood clotting.

Vitamin D, provides about 25% of the Daily Value. Vitamin D helps promote the absorption of calcium and enhances bone mineralization.

Protein, provides about 16% of the Daily Value and all of the essential amino acids. Protein builds and repairs muscle tissue and is a source of energy during intense physical activities.

Vitamin B12, provides about 22% of the Daily Value. Vitamin B12 helps build red blood cells that carry oxygen from the lungs to the muscles.

Riboflavin (Vitamin B2), provides about 26% of the Daily Value. Riboflavin helps convert food into energy. It is also involved in exercising muscles.

Phosphorus, provides about 25% of the Daily Value. Phosphorus helps strengthen bones.


American Dairy Association of Indiana's
 Every Single Day TV Spot.


Resources

Ensure accurate and cost effective nutritional analysis for your recipes utilizing an extensive research database and over 25 years experience. A valuable service for the Recipe Blogger, Media, Cookbook Publishers, Writers, Chefs, and Recipe Websites. Your readers will benefit from the Nutrition information and a Registered Dietitian. Contact: Dietitians-Online.com; Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN, LN atrecipenews@gmail.com

Wednesday, January 10, 2018

January 10, National Cut Your Energy Costs Day

Keep America Beautiful believes each of us holds an obligation to preserve and protect our environment. Through our everyday choices and actions, we collectively have a huge impact on our world. Keep America Beautiful follows a practical approach that unites citizens, businesses and government to find solutions advancing core issues of preventing litter, reducing waste, cutting energy costs, and beautifying communities.




How You Can Help


•Consolidate your purchases into one bag rather than getting a new bag at each store.

•Plan your shopping in advance. Save money on fuel by making fewer trips to the stores.
Avoid last minute shopping when you won’t have time to make careful choices.

•When buying electronics, remember to buy rechargeable batteries to go with them.

•Electronics. Never throw old computers, monitors, TV’s, printers, or other electronics in the landfill. Instead, donate them to a local charity for reuse, or find out about your local e-cycling programs.

•Reduce the amount of trash you throw away and reuse products before you throw them out or recycle them. This creates the least impact on the planet and our resources.

•Compost your food waste. Fruits and vegetables and their peels, pits and seeds are all perfect for composting, a great natural fertilizer.


•Turn Off The Heat When Not Home


•Use Leftovers, Don't Waste




Tuesday, January 9, 2018

January 9, Apricot Day: Selection, Storage, Nutrition, and Preparation



In 1961, the Apricot Producers of California (APC) was established. It is a non-profit cooperative association providing information and services to its grower-members within the major apricot producing areas of California.

APC created a website, which features practical information about California apricots. It contains nutritional information, serving suggestions and tips on using and selecting California apricots, APC is actively involved in lobbying governmental and trade organizations; sponsorship of a variety of educational and informational efforts to the foodservice industry, dietitians, and consumers; participation and attendance of trade shows and continued media enhancement.

Today, there are over four hundred apricot growers. They produce apricots from orchards covering 21,000 acres in the San Joaquin Valley and northern California. About 95 percent of the apricots grown in the U.S. come from California.


Apricot Stone,
Eva Rivas, Armenia

Spanish explorers introduced the apricot to California in the 18th century, and recorded history indicates in 1792 the first major California crop was produced. By 1920, the California apricot was flourishing in the Santa Clara Valley. Eventually California apricot farms found their way to the San Joaquin Valley after World War II.

Apricot Selection and Storage
Fresh apricots range in color from yellow to deep orange. Avoid green apricots, as they will not ripen. When selecting fresh apricots, look for fruits soft to the touch and juicy, these are ready to eat. The fruits vary in size from about 1-1/2 to 2-1/2 inches in diameter. The apricot should have a bright, ripe aroma. Stay away from bruised, soft, or mushy apricots.

Apricots will ripen at room temperature or can be stored in the refrigerator to prevent over ripening. A hard apricot can ripen by placing it in a paper bag for one to two days. To freeze apricots, cut the fruit in half and place on a baking sheet until frozen, once they are frozen, store in plastic freezer bags up to 3 months.

Apricots can be purchased fresh, canned, frozen, pureed, dried and as nectar both in juice and concentrated form.


Nutrition Information
Apricots are rich in beta-carotene, Vitamin C, potassium, iron and Vitamin A. They are also high in fiber and low in saturated fat and sodium. Apricots contain no cholesterol. Just three apricots contain 40 percent of the daily requirement of Vitamin A.






Preparation
Apricots are great to eat raw, but they are excellent in fruit salads and added to baked goods such as pies, cakes, muffins, breads, puddings and ice cream. They can be used in cooking and are compatible with many poultry and pork dishes.

Canned apricots can be added to cereals, yogurt, cottage cheese and smoothies. Fresh, canned, frozen or even dried apricots can be served on top of waffles and pancakes. They can be pureed and used as a fat substitute. 





Recipe: Savory Fresh Apricot Bites
Serves 12. Each serving equals 1/2 cup of fruit or vegetables
Nutritional analysis per serving. Calories 77, Protein 3g, Fat 3g, Calories From Fat 26%, Carbohydrates 10g, Cholesterol 0mg, Fiber 2g, Sodium 52mg.
Source: California Fresh Apricot Council

Ingredients
4 oz fat-free cream cheese, softened
12 fresh apricots, halved
½ cup pistachios, finely chopped

Stir cream cheese until smooth; pipe or spoon into apricot halves. Sprinkle tops with  pistachios. Serve as an appetizer, snack, or dessert.









Ensure accurate and cost effective nutritional analysis for your recipes utilizing an extensive research database and over 25 years experience. A valuable service for the Recipe Blogger, Media, Cookbook Publishers, Writers, Chefs, and Recipe Websites. Your readers will benefit from the Nutrition information and a Registered Dietitian. Contact: Dietitians-Online.com; Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN, LN atrecipenews@gmail.com

Monday, January 8, 2018

National Clean Off Your Desk Day
Desktop Dining Poses Food Poisoning Risk


CHICAGO – A whopping 83 percent of Americans typically desktop dine in an effort to save time and money, but not practicing proper food safety at the office could end up costing them both. When it comes to protecting themselves against foodborne illnesses, many professionals are still "out to lunch."

According to a survey by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and ConAgra Foods' Home Food Safety program, a majority of Americans continue to eat lunch (62 percent) and snack throughout the day (50 percent) at their desks, while 27 percent typically find breakfast the first thing on their desktop to-do list. Late nights at the office even leave a small percentage (4 percent) dining at their desktop for dinner.

"For many people, multitasking through lunch is part of the average workday," says registered dietitian and Academy Spokesperson Toby Smithson. "While shorter lunch hours may result in getting more accomplished, they could also be causing workers to log additional sick days, as desktops hide bacteria that can lead to foodborne illness."
Top of the Workplace To-Do List – Washing Hands and Surfaces

Only half of all Americans say they always wash their hands before eating lunch. In order to reduce the risk of foodborne illness, Smithson recommends washing your hands before and after handling food with soap and warm water and keeping your desk stocked with moist towelettes or hand sanitizer for those times you can't get to the sink. "A clean desktop and hands are your best defense to avoid foodborne illnesses at the office," she says.

According to the Home Food Safety survey, only 36 percent of respondents clean their work areas—desktop, keyboard, mouse—weekly and 64 percent do so only once a month or less. A study updated in 2007 by the University of Arizona found the average desktop has 100 times more bacteria than a kitchen table and 400 times more than the average toilet seat. "Treat your desktop like you would your kitchen table and counters at home," says Smithson. "Clean all surfaces, whether at home or work, before you prepare or eat food on them."


Forget the Watercooler, Gather Around the Refrigerator

Even though virtually all workplaces now have a refrigerator, only 67 percent of those surveyed say it is where they store their lunch. Frighteningly though, approximately one in five people admit they don't know if it is ever cleaned or say it is rarely or never cleaned. Smithson recommends not only cleaning the office refrigerator but also using a refrigerator thermometer to ensure food is safely stored below 40 degrees Fahrenheit.

When it comes to safe refrigeration of lunches, perishable foods need to be refrigerated within two hours (one hour if the temperature is greater than 90 degrees Fahrenheit) from when it was removed from the refrigerator at home. However, survey results show that 49 percent admit to letting perishable food sit out for three or more hours, meaning foods may have begun to spoil before the first bite.


Microwave Continuing Education

Besides a refrigerator, nearly all office kitchens also have a microwave oven (97 percent), making leftovers and frozen meals easy, quick and inexpensive lunch options. It is crucial to follow the microwave cooking instructions on the package closely when cooking prepared food in the microwave.

Microwave ovens can cook unevenly and leave cold spots, where harmful bacteria can survive. The recommended way to ensure that food is cooked to the correct temperature, thereby eliminating any harmful bacteria that may be present, is to use a food thermometer. Re-heat all leftovers to the proper temperature of 165 degrees Fahrenheit.

"Food safety is very important, whether at home or at work. Simple things like washing your hands before preparing food and following microwave cooking instructions can really go a long way," said Joan Menke-Schaenzer, chief global quality officer, ConAgra Foods.

*HealthFocus International conducted the home food safety survey in April 2011 for the Academy and ConAgra Foods through an online survey of a random sample of 2,191 full-time employees, both men and women, who work at a desk. The sample was chosen to closely match U.S. population demographics.

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is the world's largest organization of food and nutrition professionals. The Academy is committed to improving the nation's health and advancing the profession of dietetics through research, education, and advocacy. Visit the Academy at www.eatright.org.

Resource
Today’s Dietitian
New Survey Finds Desktop Dining Poses Food Poisoning Risk



Sunday, January 7, 2018

January 7, National Tempura Day - Tempura Tofu and Spring Vegetables




Tempura is a Japanese dish of seafood or vegetables that have been battered and deep-fried.

Tempura batter is traditionally mixed in small batches using chopsticks for only a few seconds, leaving lumps in the mixture that, along with the cold batter temperature, result in the unique fluffy and crisp tempura structure when cooked. The batter is often kept cold by adding ice, or by placing the bowl inside a larger bowl with ice in it. Over mixing the batter will result in activation of wheat gluten, which causes the flour mixture to become soft and dough-like when fried.

Specially formulated tempura flour is available in worldwide supermarkets. This is generally light (low-gluten) flour, and occasionally contains leaveners such as baking powder.Tempura generally does not use breadcrumbs (panko) in the coating.


Thin slices or strips of vegetables or seafood are dipped in the batter, then briefly deep-fried in hot oil. Vegetable oil or canola oil are most common; however, tempura was traditionally cooked using sesame oil. Many specialty shops still use sesame oil or tea seed oil, and it is thought certain compounds in these oils help to produce light, crispier batter.


Resources
1. Wikipedia, Tempura
2. Cooking Light, Tempura Tofu and Spring Vegetables


Saturday, January 6, 2018

January 6,
National Bean Day

The nutrition information provided below is based on 1/2 cup cooked beans, prepared from dry beans. No salt has been added, therefore sodium levels are insignificant. Beans contain no cholesterol and a small amount of fat. Beans are a great source of fiber, high in potassium and contain many of the B vitamins. Beans also provide between 7% to 18% of one's daily iron needs.

All About Beans


The US Dry Bean Council (USDBC) is a private trade association comprised of leaders in the bean industry with the common goal of promoting the U.S. edible bean trade, both in the United States and abroad, and educating U.S. consumers about the benefits of beans. The USDBC gives a voice to the bean industry and provides information to consumers, health professionals, buyers, suppliers and the media about the good taste, nutritional value and versatility of beans.

The USDBC also is a resource for information on U.S. exporters, overseas importers, U.S. dry bean classes, trade policy issues and the role of U.S.-grown beans in international food-aid efforts. USDBC also publishes foreign language newsletters and other publications designed to help overseas importers, packagers and canners better understand and maintain contact with the U.S. dry bean exporting trade.

As part of USDBC’s mission, the organization collaborates with public health organizations, research centers, universities, and the entire supply chain, from seed suppliers to farmers, processors, wholesalers, distributors, and transporters.

While the USDBC is privately funded, its representatives work closely with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) in overseas markets, and often co-sponsors activities with the U.S. Government. These activities include hosting trade missions from foreign countries to visit U.S. production and processing facilities, participating in trade shows worldwide, coordinating trade missions of U.S. exporters and growers to visit overseas markets and producing education

The USDBC is headquartered in Washington, D.C., with a marketing office in Pierre, South Dakota. In addition, USDBC representatives around the world facilitate activities and dialog between U.S. and overseas trade.


Benefits
Unlike meat-based proteins, beans are naturally low in fat and are a cholesterol-free source of protein. Research shows that a diet including beans may reduce your risk of heart disease.

A nutrient-rich food, beans contain protein, complex carbohydrates, fiber, antioxidants, and important vitamins and minerals, such as folate, B-Vitamins, manganese, potassium and iron.

Folate, a vitamin very important for pregnant women and their unborn babies, is found in beans. During pregnancy, women need more folate. Expectant mothers who consume enough of the right nutrients can help reduce the risk of birth defects.

Beans are especially important for people with certain food allergies and intolerances. For example, some people can’t tolerate gluten, a natural protein present in wheat, barley and rye. Because beans don’t contain gluten, or major allergens found in various grains, substituting beans can help provide the fiber and other nutrients that people on restricted diets may be missing. Beans come in a variety of convenient forms (such as canned beans, bean flours and dehydrated beans) that can be used in place of allergenic and gluten-containing ingredients.

Recipe Resource
US Dry Bean Council


Black Bean Soup Garnished with
Green Onions




Ensure accurate and cost effective nutritional analysis for your recipes utilizing an extensive research database and over 25 years experience. A valuable service for the Recipe Blogger, Media, Cookbook Publishers, Writers, Chefs, and Recipe Websites. Your readers will benefit from the Nutrition information and a Registered Dietitian. Contact: Dietitians-Online.com; Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN, LN, FAND at recipenews@gmail.com


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