Tuesday, October 23, 2018

October, National Apple Month: Health Benefits and Recipes



Health Benefits
Apple is a fruit rich in antioxidants and a good source of fiber. Quercetin is an antioxidant found in apples and may inhibit lung cancer. Pectin found in apples help treat diarrhea and constipation by adding bulk to the stool. Other benefits being studied include treatments for diabetes, heart disease, lowering blood pressure, lowering blood levels of LDL, reducing risks of Alzheimer’s, and decreasing bone fractures.

Apple seeds should never be eaten. They contain the poison cyanide.

Let’s not forget the peel. The apple peel contains ursolic acid, a chemical that may prevent muscle wasting.


There may be some truth to “An Apple a Day, Keeps the Doctor Away”.


Recipe

Baked Sliced Apples


Yield: 2 servings

Ingredients
2 Apples, cored and sliced
1 Tbsp Lemon juice
1/4 teaspoon Vanilla
1/2 cup Lemon-Lime Soda, diet
1/4 teaspoon Cinnamon, ground
1/2 cup Bran Flakes
1/2 cup Applesauce, unsweetened

Directions
1. Preheat oven to 375°F. In a mixing bowl, combine apples, lemon juice, vanilla, and lemon-lime soda. Toss to combine.

2 Layer sliced apples in a baking pan.
3 Combine cinnamon, bran flakes, and applesauce. Place mixture over apples.
4 Bake 45 minutes or until apples are tender.
5. Serve with low fat vanilla yogurt or ice cream.





Apples - Health Benefits with Allison Parker, MS, RD



References and Resources
1. U.S. Apple Association
2. WebMD: Apple
3. U.S. Apple Association: Recipes






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For more information, visit Dietitians-Online Nutritional Analysis Services

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October 23, National Boston Cream Pie Day - Alternative Choices




Monday, October 22, 2018

National Color Day - Explore the Many Colors of Food


Music: The Wonderful World of Color, Walt Disney and Disney World.

Eat right with colors explores the health benefits associated with eating foods of many colors. Including color diversity in your meals and food choices enhances your intake of a wide range of nutrients. 

Red and Pink Foods
Apples, Beets, Cayenne, Cherries, Cranberries, Guava, Kidney Beans, Papaya, Pink Beans, Pink/Red Grapefruit, Pomegranates, Radicchio, Radishes, Raspberries, Red Bell Peppers, Red Cabbages, Red Chili Peppers, Red Corn, Red Currants, Red Grapes, Red Onions, Red Pears, Red Peppers, Red Plums, Red Potatoes, Red Tomatoes, Rhubarb, Strawberries, Tomatoes, Watermelons

Green Foods
Alfalfa, Artichokes, Arugula, Asparagus, Avocado, Bok Choy, Broccoli, Broccoli rabe, Brussels Sprouts, Celery, Chives, Collard Greens, Cucumbers, Dandelion Greens, Edamame, Endive, Fennel, Green apples, Green Beans, Green cabbage, Green Grapes, Green Olives, Green Onion, Green Pears, Green Peas, Green Pepper, Green Tomatoes, Honeydew, Kale, Kiwi, Leeks, Lettuce, Limes, Mint, Okra, Oregano, Parsley, Pistachios, Snow Peas, Spinach, Sugar snap peas, Swiss Chard, Tarragon, Tomatillo, Wasabi, Watercress, Zucchini

Blue and Purple Foods
Blue Grapes, Blue and Purple Potatoes, Blueberries, Dried Plums, Plums, Eggplant, Pomegranates, Elderberries, Juniper Berries, Kelp (Seaweed), Purple Belgian Endive, Purple Cabbage, Purple Figs

Yellow and Orange Foods
Apricots, Bananas, Butternut Squash, Cantaloupe, Carrots, Cheddar Cheese, Citrus Fruits, Clementines, Corn, Creamsicle, Garbanzo Beans, Golden Apples, Golden Flax Seed, Golden Raisins, Grapefruit, Honey, Lemon, Lemongrass, Mandarin Oranges, Mangoes, Nectarines, Orange Jello, Orange Peppers, Orange Tomatoes, Oranges, Papaya, Parsnips, Peaches, Pears, Persimmons, Pineapple, Pumpkin, Rutabagas, Saffron, Salmon, Spaghetti Squash, Squash Blossoms, Sweet Corn, Sweet Potatoes, Tangerines, Whole Grains, Yams, Yellow Apples, Yellow Beans, Yellow Peppers, Yellow Summer Squash, Yellow Wax Beans

White and Black Foods
White: Cauliflower, Coconut, Garlic, Ginger, Green Onions, Scallions, Horseradish, Jicama, Kohlrabi, Leeks, Millet, Mushrooms, Onions, Parsnips, Quinoa, Shallots, Soy Products, Sunflower Seeds, Tofu, Turnips, White Beans, White Corn, White Sesame Seeds

Black: Black Beans, Black Cherries, Black Currants, Black Mushrooms, Black Olives, Black Quinoa, Black Raspberry, Black Rice, Black Sesame Seeds, Black Soybeans, Blackberries, Boysenberries, Prunes, Raisins, Seaweeds, Tamari (Soy Sauce)



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October 22, National Nut Day





Nuts once considered a high fat, high-calorie food is now being recognized as a Nutritious Snack with essential fatty acids, omega fats, protein, and many vitamins and minerals.





Answers Below

Health Benefits of Nuts

How Nuts are Prepared


Recipes and Marketing Nuts
Planters Commercial


Oregon Hazelnut





Resources and Answers
1. Peanuts
2. Cashews 
3. Walnuts 
6. Pecans
7. Macadamia
8. Almonds 



Sunday, October 21, 2018

Global Iodine Deficiency Day


Global Iodine Deficiency Disorder Day





Iodine Deficiency - Interview with Prof. Zimmermann (Zürich}

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Iodine is an essential element for healthy neurological and endocrine development. A lack of iodine in the diet may lead to mental challenges, goiter, or thyroid disease. Dependent upon the severity of the deficiency, a lack of iodine can cause a significant delay in mental development, something that can be particularly detrimental if it occurs in childhood. According to the World Health Organization in 2007, almost 2 billion people worldwide were suffering from a lack of iodine in their diets, a third of which were children and young people. Iodine deficiency is a relatively simple affliction to correct, however much of the population continues to go untreated.

Back to TopFunction

Iodine is needed for the normal metabolism of cells. Metabolism is the process of converting food into energy. Humans need iodine for normal thyroid function, and for the production of thyroid hormones.

Food Sources

Iodized salt is table salt with iodine added. It is the main food source of iodine.
Seafood is naturally rich in iodine. Cod, sea bass, haddock, and perch are good sources.
Kelp is the most common vegetable-seafood that is a rich source of iodine.
Dairy products also contain iodine.
Other good sources are plants grown in iodine-rich soil.

Recommendations
The best way to get the daily requirement of essential vitamins is to eat a balanced diet that contains a variety of foods from the food guide plate.

A 1/4 teaspoon of iodized table salt provides 95 micrograms of iodine. A 6-ounce portion of ocean fish provides 650 micrograms of iodine. Most people are able to meet the daily recommendations by eating seafood, iodized salt, and plants grown in iodine-rich soil. When buying salt make sure it is labeled "iodized."

The Food and Nutrition Board at the Institute of Medicine recommends the following dietary intake for iodine:

Infants
0 - 6 months: 110 micrograms per day (mcg/day)
7 - 12 months: 130 mcg/day

Children
1 - 3 years: 90 mcg/day
4 - 8 years: 90 mcg/day
9 - 13 years: 120 mcg/day

Adolescents and Adults
Males age 14 and older: 150 mcg/day
Females age 14 and older: 150 mcg/day

Specific recommendations depend on age, gender, and other factors (such as pregnancy). Women who are pregnant or producing breast milk (lactating) need higher amounts. Ask your health care provider which amount is best for you.

Resource
Global Iodine Deficiency Disorders (IDD) Prevention Day, National Institute of Health and Family Welfare (NIHFW), by the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (MoHFW), Government of India.









National Pumpkin Cheesecake

Pumpkin Cheesecake
Food Network


Autumn is the perfect time to add pumpkin to one of America’s favorite desserts. Cheesecake is a sweet dessert with a mixture of fresh soft cheese, cream cheese or cottage cheese, eggs and sugar on a crust made from crushed graham crackers, crushed cookies, pastry or sponge cake. Cheesecakes can be prepared baked or unbaked, flavored and are often served topped with fruit, fruit sauce, chocolate or whipped cream.


Saturday, October 20, 2018

October 20 World Osteoporosis Day
Protect Your Bones Throughout Your Life




The National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF) is the leading consumer and community-focused health organization dedicated to the prevention of osteoporosis and broken bones, the promotion of strong bones for life and the reduction of human suffering through programs of public and clinician awareness, education, advocacy, and research. Established in 1984, NOF is the nation's leading voluntary health organization solely dedicated to osteoporosis and bone health.

Osteoporosis is a major public health threat for an estimated 44 million Americans. Of the 10 million American’s estimated to already have osteoporosis, eight million are women and two million are men. 

What can you do to protect your bones?
Osteoporosis and the broken bones it can cause are not part of normal aging. Osteoporosis prevention should begin in childhood and continue throughout life.
1. Get enough calcium and vitamin D and eat a well-balanced diet.
2. Engage in regular exercise.
3. Eat foods that are good for bone health, such as fruits and vegetables.
4. Avoid smoking and limit alcohol to 2-3 drinks per day.


What Women Need to Know
Females are at a higher risk of developing osteoporosis and broken bones. 
• Of the estimated 10 million Americans with osteoporosis, about eight million or 80% are women.
• Approximately one in two women over age 50 will break a bone because of osteoporosis.
• A woman's risk of breaking a hip is equal to her combined risk of breast, uterine and ovarian cancer.
There are multiple reasons why women are more like to get osteoporosis than men, including:
• Women tend to have smaller, thinner bones than men.
• Estrogen, a hormone in women decreases sharply when women reach menopause, which can cause bone loss. This is why the chance of developing osteoporosis increases as women reach menopause.

Are You at Risk for Developing Osteoporosis?

Uncontrollable Risk Factors
•           Being over age 50.
•           Being Female.
•           Menopause.
•           Family History.
•           Low Body Weight/Being Small and Thin.
•           Broken Bones or Height Loss.
Controllable Risk Factors
•           Not Getting Enough Calcium and Vitamin D.
•           Not Eating Enough Fruits and Vegetables.
•           Getting Too Much Protein, Sodium, and Caffeine.
•           Having an Inactive Lifestyle.
•           Smoking.
•           Drinking too much alcohol.
•           Losing Weight.
There are also medications and diseases that can cause bone loss and increase your risk of osteoporosis.

Calcium and Vitamin D 
Getting enough calcium and vitamin D are essential to building stronger, denser bones early in life and to keep bones strong and healthy later in life. Calcium and vitamin D are the two most important nutrients for bone health.

Calcium-Rich Food Sources 
Dairy products, such as low-fat and non-fat milk, yogurt and cheese are high in calcium. Certain green vegetables and other foods contain calcium in smaller amounts. Some juices, breakfast foods, soymilk, cereals, snacks, and breads have calcium that has been added. 

Vitamin D Sources
There are three ways to get vitamin D:
• Sunlight 
• Food 
• Supplements 

Three Steps to Unbreakable Bones


You’re never too young or too old to improve the health of your bones. Osteoporosis prevention should begin in childhood. But it shouldn't stop there. Whatever your age, the habits you adopt now can affect your bone health for the rest of your life. Now is the time to take action.

Resources and References. To learn more about Osteoporosis, please visit the following Foundations.
World Osteoporosis Day
International Osteoporosis Foundation 




Friday, October 19, 2018

October, Breast Cancer Awareness Month
Health Benefits of Pink Foods

Health Benefits of Pink Foods





Pink Grapefruits contain lycopene. Lycopene is a naturally occurring chemical that gives fruits and vegetables a red color. It is one of a number of pigments called carotenoids. Lycopene is a powerful antioxidant that may help protect cells from damage. Current research is exploring the role of lycopene in relationship to preventing heart disease and cancer of the prostate, breast, lung, bladder, ovaries, colon, uterine, and pancreas.


Pink Salmon is a good source of omega-3 fatty acids. In addition, pink salmon is rich in calcium, protein, magnesium and potassium; and contains iron, niacin, selenium, and vitamins A, B-12, C and E. Research shows that omega-3 fatty acids may reduce inflammation and help lower risk of chronic diseases such as heart disease, cancer, and arthritis. Omega-3 fatty acids are highly concentrated in the brain and appear to be important for cognitive (brain memory and performance) and behavioral function.
Beets are a good source of fiber, potassium and folate. Researchers believe the red pigment (called betacyanin) in beets may protect against the development of cancerous cells and might play a role in reducing the inflammation associated with heart disease.
Raspberries contain high levels of ellagic acid, a polyphenol and antioxidant being studied as a food in the fight against cancer. Raspberries are also rich in anthocyanins, a flavonoid compound that gives them their red color. Anthocyanins may help protect the circulatory, cardiovascular and neurological systems. Raspberries are a rich source of vitamin C, manganese and dietary fiber; and is a low-glycemic index food.

Red Onions are a natural sources of quercetin. Quercetin is a bioflavonoid and has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Quercetin is being studied for treating conditions of high cholesterol, heart disease, circulation problems, diabetes, cataracts, peptic ulcers, inflammation, asthma, gout, chronic fatigue syndrome, preventing cancer, and for treating chronic infections of the prostate. Quercetin research is evaluating the effectiveness of increased endurance and improved athletic performance. Red onions also provide allicin, an organic sulfur compound responsible for the taste and smell of onions. Allicin may protect against inflammation, allergies, and bacteria; and may reduce the risk factors of certain types of cancers.

Guavas are rich in dietary fiber, vitamins A and C, folic acid, potassium, and manganese. A guava contains about 4 times the amount of vitamin C as an orange. Vitamin C is an antioxidant, which helps, protects cells from free radical damage. Currently there is insufficient evidence to rate the effectiveness of guava in the treatment of colic, diarrhea, diabetes, cough, cataracts, high cholesterol, heart disease, cancer, and other conditions. More research is needed to evaluate the usefulness of guava for these conditions.
Yogurt, Raspberry, Low Fat or Fat-Free Yogurt has been associated with a wide range of health benefits, due to its bacterial cultures and the many nutrients it contains. Yogurt is an excellent source of protein, calcium and potassium. Some research shows that yogurt with probiotic cultures may help improve the immune system; reduce yeast infections in women; help with digestion; and reduce colon and other cancer risks. Calcium has beneficial effects on bone mass and may help prevent osteoporosis. Many people who are lactose intolerant can enjoy yogurt. One serving of yogurt is one eight-ounce cup or serving.







National Breast Cancer Awareness Month
NBCAM Organizations Working Together
References
.
National Breast Cancer Awareness Month
American Cancer Society (ACS) www.cancer.org
American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists www.acog.org
American College of Radiology (ACR) www.acr.org
The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) www.asco.org
The American Medical Women's Association (AMWA) www.amwa-doc.org
CancerCare www.cancercare.org
Men Against Breast Cancer (MABC) www.menagainstbreastcancer.org
National Medical Association (NMA), www.nmanet.org
The Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) www.ons.org
Prevent Cancer Foundation www.preventcancer.org
Susan G. Komen for the Cure® www.komen.org
Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) www.cms.gov
National Cancer Institute (NCI), www.cancer.gov

National Mammography Day - Remind a friend to have a Mammogram

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Today is National Mammography Day.
Remind a friend to have a Mammogram. Pass it Along.


Information obtained from the
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


A mammogram is an x-ray of the breast used to look for early signs of breast cancer. Regular mammograms are the best tests doctors have to find breast cancer early. When breast cancer is found early, many women go on to live long and healthy lives.

Women should have mammograms every two years from age 50 to 74 years, and more often if breast cancer runs in the family or you have any symptoms or changes in your breast.

To find out where you can get a mammogram, the CDC has provided the following resources.

1. If you have a regular doctor, talk to him or her. 
2. Call the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Information Service (CIS) at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237). For TTY: 1-800-332-8615. 
3. For Medicare information, you can call 1-800 MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227) or visit The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. 
4. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has a program called the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program, which works with health departments and other groups to provide low-cost or free mammograms to women who qualify. Find out if you qualify.



Thursday, October 18, 2018

World Menopause Day
How to Avoid Menopausal Weight Gain


Every woman will go through the “change of life,” around 50 years of age plus or minus. This is the time of her last period (or menstruation). Symptoms of menopause vary with every woman. Common symptoms include hot flashes; night sweats; sleep irregularity; mood changes; and possible weight gain around the middle. Some women go through menopause without symptoms.

Due to a decrease in hormone levels and the aging process, many women find themselves gaining weight in their forties and fifties. There is a loss of muscle, which decreases the metabolism; and a gain of fat, mainly in the belly area. Lifestyle factors will play an important role in how you handle menopause. Menopausal women tend to be less active and eat more calories than they need.

Nutrition, Eating and
Wellness Guidelines for Menopause
  1. Maintain a healthy weight; it will decrease your risk of heart disease and other problems. 
  2. Meet your calcium and vitamin D needs. This is important to maintain healthy bones and prevent bone loss that may occur after menopause. Good food sources of calcium include dairy products, such as milk, yogurt and cheese; fortified soy and rice beverages; fortified juices; and canned fish with bones. Good food sources of vitamin D include milk, fortified soy and rice beverages, fortified juices, and fatty fish. 
  3. Be physically active every day. Physical activity helps maintain a healthy weight, keep bones strong and energy levels up, and decrease the risk of heart disease and other age-related complications.
  4. Some women will try soy and flax in food to help relieve the side effects of menopause. Currently, studies have not proven that soy and flax help.
  5. Wear lightweight and layered clothes. Body temperature fluctuates from hot to cold.
  6. Keep a cold glass of water by your side. Due to hot flashes and excessive sweating, it is important to stay hydrated.
  7. Relax.
  8. Take time to laugh.

How to Avoid Menopausal Weight Gain
You don't have to gain weight as a result of menopause.
Elizabeth Somer, RD explains how to avoid weight gain after menopause.

The Menopause Blues



I Will Not Age


Is It Hot In Here, Or Is It Me?


Resources and References


The International Menopause Society (IMS), in collaboration with the World Health Organization, has designated October 18 as World Menopause Day. To celebrate World Menopause Day, IMS is launching a new campaign to create awareness of understanding weight gain at menopause and the implications it can have on the future health of women in the post-menopausal period. 

For women aged 55–65 years, weight gain is one of their major health concerns and many are not aware of the health implications of excessive weight gain, particularly around the abdomen, which is associated with a heightened risk of cardiovascular and metabolic disease, and also impacts adversely on health-related quality of life and sexual function.
An educational toolkit of materials have been developed to support local country initiatives throughout the month of October to raise awareness of this potential health issue and many have been translated into key languages to ensure the campaign has a truly international perspective.

The IMS hopes that national societies will take the opportunity of World Menopause Day to highlight the increasing importance of menopausal health issues, by contacting the women of their country to encourage them to talk to their doctors about menopause and its long-term effects.

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Eating Right during Menopause

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

National Take Your Parents to Lunch Day


National Take Your Parents to Lunch Day is an event that takes place each October. Parents visit their children’s school and have lunch with them in the cafeteria. The goal is to learn more about what goes into putting together a healthy lunch, and for parents and school officials to open the lines of communication so they can work together to provide kids with the healthiest meals possible.

To find out more about National Take Your Parents to Lunch Day visit KIWI.


October 17, International Day for the Eradication of Poverty




2018 Theme: 

“Coming together with those furthest behind to build an inclusive world of universal respect for human rights and dignity”


The United Nations Sustainable Development Goal to “end poverty in all its forms everywhere” explicitly recognizes that poverty results not from the lack of just one thing but from many different interrelated factors that affect the lives of people living in poverty.

This means we must go beyond seeing poverty merely as the lack of income or what is necessary for material well-being — such as food, housing, land, and other assets – in order to fully understand poverty in its multiple dimensions.

The theme this year – selected in consultation with activists, civil society, and non-governmental organizations – highlights how important it is to recognize and address the humiliation and exclusion endured by many people living in poverty.


Secretary-General's Message for 2018

Twenty-five years ago, the world commemorated the first International Day for the Eradication of Poverty. Since then, nearly 1 billion people have escaped poverty, thanks to political leadership, inclusive economic development, and international cooperation.

However, many are still being left behind. Over 700 million people are unable to meet their basic daily needs. Many live in situations of conflict and crisis; others face barriers in accessing health care, education and job opportunities, preventing them from benefitting from broader economic development. And women are disproportionately affected.

Eradicating poverty in all its forms and dimensions, as embodied in Goal 1 of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, remains one of the greatest global challenges and a major priority for the United Nations.

This year, as we celebrate the 70th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, let us remember that ending poverty is not a matter of charity but a question of justice. There is a fundamental connection between eradicating extreme poverty and upholding the equal rights of all people.

We must listen to the millions of people experiencing poverty and destitution across the globe, tackle the power structures that prevent their inclusion in society and address the indignities they face. We must build a fair globalization that creates opportunities for all and ensures that rapid technological development boosts our poverty eradication efforts. On this International Day for the Eradication of Poverty let us commit to uphold the core pledge of the 2030 Agenda to leave no one behind.    -António Guterres




Social Media:
Join the End Poverty campaign and use hashtags:
#EndPoverty, #GlobalGoals, #SDGs.

Follow on Twitter @undesadspd and on Facebook at http://bit.ly/2QUfTqM



Tuesday, October 16, 2018

October 16, World Food Day - Our Actions are Our Future

Either we build a future for all, or there will be no acceptable future for anyone.
World Food Day 2018


World Food Day was established by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) in November 1979. FAO celebrates World Food Day each year on October 16th, the day on which the Organization was founded in 1945.


The official World Food Day theme is announced by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. The goal is to give focus to World Food Day observances and raise awareness and understanding of approaches to end hunger. The 2018 Theme is "Our Actions are our Future".

Achieving food security for all is at the heart of FAO's efforts – to make sure people have regular access to enough high-quality food to lead active, healthy lives.

The three main goals are: the eradication of hunger, food insecurity and malnutrition; the elimination of poverty and the driving forward of economic and social progress for all; and, the sustainable management and utilization of natural resources, including land, water, air, climate and genetic resources for the benefit of present and future generations.


The objectives of World Food Day are to:

*Climate actions to change our world
    Don’t waste water.
    Diversify your diet.

    Keep fish populations afloat.
    Keep soils and water clean.
    Buy organic
    Energy efficient is best
    Use solar panels or other green energy systems
    Buy only what you need
    Pick ugly fruit and vegetables
    Don’t let labels fool you
    Limit your plastic
    Recycle paper, plastic, glass, and aluminum
    Store food wisely
    Love your leftovers
    Make plant food
    Be rubbish-savvy
    Make cities greener
    Shop local.
    Protect forests and save paper
    Bike, walk or use public transport
    Be a conscientious consumer
    Keep up to date on climate change
    Be an advocate!


*Encourage attention to agricultural food production and to stimulate national, bilateral, multilateral and non-governmental efforts to this end;

*Encourage economic and technical cooperation among developing countries;

*Encourage the participation of rural people, particularly women and the least privileged categories, in decisions and activities influencing their living conditions;

*Heighten public awareness of the problem of hunger in the world;

*Promote the transfer of technologies to the developing world; and

*Strengthen international and national solidarity in the struggle against hunger, malnutrition, and poverty and draw attention to achievements in food and agricultural development.


To learn more about World Food Day, visit the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO).

Follow FAO World Food Day on Twitter.

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