Wednesday, May 24, 2017

National Asparagus Month - Selection, Preparation, Recipes


Asparagus is a perennial garden plant belonging to the Lily family. It is harvested in the spring when it is 6 to 8 inches tall. The most common variety of asparagus is green in color. There are two other edible varieties available. White asparagus is grown underground to inhibit its development of chlorophyll content, therefore creating its distinctive white coloring. It is generally found canned, although you may find it fresh in some select markets, and it is generally more expensive than the green variety since its production is more labor intensive. The other edible variety of asparagus is purple in color. It is smaller than the green or white variety (usually just 2 to 3 inches tall) and features a fruitier flavor. It also provides benefits from phytonutrients called anthocyanins that give it its purple color.

Nutrition Information
Low in calories, only 20 per 3.5 oz. serving
Contains no fat or cholesterol
Very low in sodium
A good source of potassium.(1)
A source of fiber (2 grams per 3.5 serving)
An excellent source of folic acid
A significant source of thiamin and vitamin B6


Selection
Asparagus stalks should be rounded, and neither fat nor twisted. Look for firm, thin stems with deep green or purplish closed tips. The cut ends should not be too woody, although a little woodiness at the base prevents the stalk from drying out. Once trimmed and cooked, asparagus loses about half its total weight. Use asparagus within a day or two after purchasing for best flavor and texture. Store in the refrigerator with the ends wrapped in a damp paper towel.

Preparation and Cooking
Thin asparagus does not require peeling. Asparagus with thick stems should be peeled because the stems are usually tough and stringy. Remove the tough outer skin of the bottom portion of the stem (not the tips) with a vegetable peeler. Wash asparagus under cold water to remove any sand or soil residues. It is best to cook asparagus whole. If you want to cut asparagus into small pieces, it is best to cut them after they are cooked. Asparagus can be served hot or cold.

Serving Ideas
•  Add cold asparagus to your favorite salad.
•  Toss cooked pasta with asparagus, olive oil and your favorite pasta spices. 
•  Chopped asparagus make a flavorful and colorful addition to omelets.
•  Sauté asparagus with garlic, mushrooms and tofu or chicken for a complete meal.

Recipes
Asparagus Recipes & Tips from The Produce Lady


How To Make Perfectly Roasted Asparagus



EatingWell, Asparagus 

Food Network, Asparagus recipes

National Osteoporosis Awareness and Prevention Month


May is National Osteoporosis Awareness and Prevention Month. The National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF) is the leading consumer and community-focused health organization dedicated to the prevention of osteoporosis and broken bones, the promotion of strong bones for life and the reduction of human suffering through programs of public and clinician awareness, education, advocacy and research.

The drastic consequence of osteoporosis is visible in the lives of the millions of sufferers worldwide. Researchers today know a lot about how you can protect your bones throughout your life. Getting enough calcium, vitamin D and regular exercise are important for your bones.

Feed Your Bones Today

Fact and Fiction about Osteoporosis



What You Need To Know About Milk



Nutrition and Health: Osteoporosis
by The Dairy and Nutrition Council of Indiana and Indiana Dairy Farmers

You’re never too young or too old to improve the health of your bones. Osteoporosis prevention should begin in childhood. But it shouldn’t stop there. Whatever your age, the habits you adopt now can affect your bone health for the rest of your life. Now is the time to take action.

Monday, May 22, 2017

May 22, International Day for Biological Diversity


The United Nations proclaimed May 22 The International Day for Biological Diversity (IDB).  

The theme has been chosen to coincide with the observance of 2017 as the International Year of Sustainable Tourism for Development as proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly in its Resolution 70/193 and for which the United Nations World Tourism Organization is providing leadership.

Biodiversity, at the level of species and ecosystems, provides an important foundation for many aspects of tourism. Recognition of the great importance to tourism economies of attractive landscapes and a rich biodiversity underpins the political and economic case for biodiversity conservation. Many issues addressed under the Convention on Biological Diversity directly affect the tourism sector. A well-managed tourist sector can contribute significantly to reducing threats to, and maintain or increase, key wildlife populations and biodiversity values through tourism revenue.

For many coastal communities, the survival of marine and coastal ecosystems and biodiversity is essential to their nutritional, spiritual, societal and religious well-being. But even for the many millions of people who may not think that they have any strong reliance on the ocean, marine ecosystems and wildlife provide all kinds of benefits. Many coastal environments provide protection for those farther inland from the ravages of the sea. Coral reefs buffer land from waves and storms and prevent beach erosion. Dune systems on beaches stabilize shorelines from erosion and encroachment. Mangroves, mudflats and deltas trap sediment, preventing the land behind it from sliding ever-seaward.


The ocean world is in all our daily lives. For example, sponges from the Mediterranean have been used for painting, cooking, cleaning and even contraception for at least 5,000 years. Substances derived from seaweeds stabilize and thicken creams, sauces, and pastes, are mixed into paint and used to make paper and even in skin lotion and toothpaste.

Many marine plants and animals also contain a multitude of substances already being used, or identified as being of potential use, in medicines. Each of the 700 known species of cone snail produces a unique cocktail of 100 to 200 toxins, some of which have already been developed into pain killers: one, which has been on the market since 2004, is more than 100 times more powerful than morphine. A 2010 study predicted the existence of between 250,000 and close to 600,000 chemicals in the marine environment, approximately 92 percent of which remained undiscovered; those chemicals, the study’s authors estimated, might yield up to 214 new anti-cancer drugs, worth anywhere from US $563 billion to $5.69 trillion.


Most importantly of all, tiny marine plants called phytoplankton produce energy, like plants on land, through photosynthesis. As a result of that photosynthesis, they release oxygen. In fact, phytoplankton release half of all oxygen in the atmosphere.



Under the Sea

International Day for Biological Diversity 2017

Sunday, May 21, 2017

World Day for Cultural Diversity
Exploring Food Diversity

Today is a wonderful day to celebrate the many cultural foods that makeup the American Cuisine. The diversity can be seen as we travel across the country. There are regional differences and the influences of immigrants from all over the world.





New England is known for seafood, particularly lobster, and a creamy clam chowder. The Southern states are known for collard greens (leafy greens), chicken and dumplings, black eyed peas and cornbread. Grits is a popular breakfast dish in the South. The Midwest has traditionally been a beef and grain producing area so meats, potatoes and breads are foods found there. In the Pacific Northwest fresh salmon is a specialty and in the Southwest, the Mexican influence can be seen. California and Hawaii are both known for growing many different fruits, and Alaska is known for its fish and King Crab.

As a nation of immigrants, our foods have expanded to include worldwide cuisines, traditions, and religious influences. Many ethnic dishes are joining the American food culture and are seeing an incredible boost in familiarity, approval and consumption.



Foods from All Over the World




Healthy Choices
Table of Cuisines (from Menu Solutions)


Cuisine
Healthier Choices
Limit
Delicatessen Selections
Extra lean corned beef, pastrami, or roast beef, beef brisket, and turkey breast are best; whole wheat or multi-grain breads; chicken or tuna salad; chopped herring; chef salad; fresh fruit plate with cottage cheese; dry bagel; borscht or broth soup; tossed salad, sliced tomatoes, beet salad, or carrot raisin salad.
High-fat meats (regular corn beef, hot pastrami, beef bologna, hot dogs, knockwurst, liverwurst, and salami); potato salad; mayonnaise based salads; combo sandwiches (Reuben); smoked fish (lox); creamy coleslaw; chopped liver; excess cream cheese and cheese spreads; sauerkraut (high in sodium).
Pizza Parlor Selections
You cannot go wrong by ordering extra toppings such as onions, peppers, mushrooms, tomato slices, broccoli and spinach. Other possibilities include chicken, crab meat, or shrimp.  
Fat starts with the basic cheese, so avoid extra cheese and in particular mozzarella. Other culprits include bacon, meatballs, pepperoni, sausage, and prosciutto, as well as anchovies.
Sandwich Shop Selections
Both 100% whole wheat and pita bread are great choices. Good sandwich fillers are grilled chicken breast, ham, roast beef, and turkey breast. Instruct the server not to add butter, margarine, or mayonnaise to the bread and substitute with ketchup, mustard, or horseradish. Good salad choices include chef, garden, or Greek salads, but remember to ask for low-calorie dressings on the side and to omit egg or cheese. Broth-type soups are good, such as barley, beef, chicken, lentil, split pea, and vegetable noodle.
Avoid croissants, cheese, excess mayonnaise, egg, and creamy soups. Beware of "diet plates" with big burgers and scoops of cottage cheese, which have loads of saturated fat. Omit cheeseburgers, cheese sandwiches, or grilled cheese "melts" over chicken and seafood salads; and cold cuts. Combo sandwiches with meat and cheese and club sandwiches are best avoided due to the large portion size.Remember that salad combos such as tuna, chicken, and crab meat have lots of mayonnaise. Avoid creamy soups such as chowders or cream of "anything."
Submarine Shop Selections
Order the smaller size roll or pita bread. Turkey, smoked turkey, ham, and roast beef are acceptable. Ask the server to go light on the meats, omit the mayonnaise or oil, and generously load up on the shredded lettuce, onion, peppers, pickles, and sliced tomatoes. Choose salads as alternatives when available, such as chef or tossed salads with perhaps a scoop of tuna, chicken, or seafood served with Italian or pita bread. 
Omit meats such as bologna, Italian cold cuts, salami (hard or Genoa) and sausages. Stay away from cheeses and steak and cheese. Other items to omit include antipasto salads, fried eggplant, and chicken cutlets.
Chinese Selections
Order plain steamed rice; boiled, steamed, or stir-fried vegetables (ask for little oil to be used); moderate fish and shellfish; non-fried tofu; skinless poultry and egg roll (insides only).
Anything fried (rice or crispy noodles), or with sweet and sour sauce; egg dishes or soups; salty soups; avoid duck and limit beef, pork and picked foods; excess soy sauce; ask chef to leave out MSG and cut down the use of commonly used corn starch, sugar, and salt.
Indian Selections
Order chutney (except mango); curry sauce (yogurt based); fish (omit butter basting); yogurt with shredded vegetables; basmati rice. Biryani (vegetable dish); chapatti or papadum bread; tandoori chicken; lentil or mulligatawny soups
Creamy or high-salt soups; clarified butter (ghee); deep fried meats; poori or paratha bread; fried samosa or pakora; ask to prepare dishes without excess salt and to omit coconut milk, if possible; omit garnishes with nuts or dried fruit.
Italian Selections
Order antipasto (no oil or excess meats); crusty bread (no oil or butter); broiled or grilled fish, seafood, chicken, and meats; garlic; plain or vegetable pasta; fresh unsalted mozzarella cheese; steamed leafy vegetables (kale and broccoli); salads; fresh tomatoes; zucchini; ices.
Garlic bread; stuffed pastas (ravioli and lasagna); fried eggplant; meatballs or sausage; sauces with butter, cream, oil, and wine base; pesto sauce; cheese-filled or parmesan style dishes; spumoni or tortoni ice cream. Beware of risotto rice; polenta; and high-fat, high-sodium prosciutto ham and pancetta; veal cutlets and Caesar salads.
Japanese Selections
Order rice; steamed fish; sushi; sashimi; miso soup; raw vegetables; tofu; sukiyaki (stir-fried); yakimono (broiled fish).
Tempura and other deep-fried food; excess peanut and teriyaki sauce; pickled foods; excess salt and sugar in sauces; excess salt in soy marinades and sauces.
Mediterranean (Middle East) Selections
Order couscous, bulgar, and pita bread; legumes such as chickpeas, fava beans, and lentils; hummus; grape leaves; yogurt.
Phyllo dough dishes for sweet desserts such as baklava; feta and kasseri cheese; excess anchovies and olives; high sodium foods; feta, olives and sausage; appetizers in general, except salads; excess fat from butter, olive oil, omelet's and tahini.
Mexican Selections
Order soft-shell tacos; burritos; fajitas; salsa; chicken enchilada; black beans or Mexican rice; grilled fish or chicken; salads without chips or shells; moderate corn or flour tortilla, using minimal oil; cerviche (marinated fish); gazpacho; chile con carne soup, with no cheese. Acceptable items include shredded lettuce; spicy meats; diced tomatoes; salsa verde; picante or tomato sauce; use Mexican salads as appetizers, with salsa as the dressing.
Chips, nachos; super nachos; chili con queso; fried taco or tortilla shells; guacamole; sour cream; cheese; refried beans; beef and pork dishes; olives; items such as chilies rellenos, chimichangas, chorizo (sausage), and flautas.
Thai Selections
Order steamed rice; broth-based soups (tom yum koang and pok taek); non-fried proteins, such as chicken, seafood, and tofu; vegetables; satay or steamed mussels; salads with light dressings, made with Thai spices.
Excess sodium; soy sauce and sugar; MSG; coconut milk, coconut oil; cream dishes, high milk and sodium soups; many fried appetizers; curry or curry sauce; fried eggplant; cashew and peanut toppings.

Resources
1. United Nations. World Day for Cultural Diversity



Saturday, May 20, 2017

International Pickle Week - Nutrition and Pickling


                      Quick Pickles - Everyday Food with Sarah Carey




Nutrition

Resource




May is National High Blood Pressure
Education Month



The World Hypertension League (WHL) is a division of the International Society of Hypertension (ISH), and is in official relations with the World Health Organization (WHO).

World Hypertension Day was established to highlight preventable stroke, heart and kidney diseases caused by high blood pressure and to communicate to the public information on prevention, detection and treatment.

What is Blood Pressure?

Blood pressure is the force applied against the walls of the arteries as the heart pumps blood through the body.


Know Your Blood Pressure Number
The first number, systolic blood pressure measures the maximum pressure exerted as the heart contracts. A measurement over 90 and under 140 is generally considered normal for an adult.
The lower number indicates diastolic pressure is a measurement taken between beats, when the heart is at rest. A measurement over 60 and under 90 is generally considered normal for an adult.

High Blood Pressure is a Global Epidemic. Over 1.5 billion people world-wide suffer from high blood pressure (or hypertension).


Lower Your Sodium


Prevention and Control of High Blood Pressure
1. Maintain a Healthy Weight
2. Eat More Fresh Vegetables and Fruits
3. Cut Back on Salt Intake
4. Exercise
5. Check your Blood Pressure Regularly
6. If you are on medication, take the medication as prescribed.


Resources
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI). National High Blood Pressure Education Program

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). High Blood Pressure Education Month

The International Society of Hypertension (ISH).
ISH's main objectives are to promote and encourage the advancement of scientific knowledge in all aspects of research and its application to prevention and management of heart disease and stroke in hypertension and related cardiovascular diseases around the world.

The World Hypertension League (WHL).  The objectives of the World Hypertension League (WHL) are to promote the detection, control and prevention of arterial hypertension in populations.

Friday, May 19, 2017

Food Revolution Day

Food Revolution Day is fighting to put compulsory practical food education on the school curriculum.

With diet-related diseases rising at an alarming rate, it has never been more important to educate children about food, where it comes from and how it affects their bodies.


It’s about celebrating the importance of cooking good food from scratch and raising awareness of how it impacts our health and happiness – we believe that everyone should know about food and it starts with getting kids food smart, making cooking fun and inspiring a love of food that will last a lifetime. Food Revolution Day is a campaign by the Jamie Oliver Food Foundation in the UK and USA, and The Good Foundation in Australia. 


Jamie Olive's Big Bet on Food Education




Who is taking part?
Food Revolution Day is open to anybody, whether you’re a school, organisation or individual.

Many activities are organised by supporters in their local area or voluntary Food Revolution ambassadors who champion food knowledge and cooking skills in their communities.

Why have a day of action?
Learning about food and how to cook from scratch is one of the most valuable skills a child can ever learn.

This knowledge used to be passed down from generation to generation, but now, with an over reliance on unhealthy convenience foods, millions of people lack the confidence and even the most basic skills to cook for themselves and their families. By educating children about food in a fun and engaging way, we’re equipping them and future generations with the skills they need to live healthier lives.

National Bike to Work Day and National Bicycle Month


May, National Bicycle Month, sponsored by the League of American Bicyclists.

MissionTo promote bicycling for fun, fitness and transportation and work through advocacy and education for a bicycle-friendly America.

History. The League was founded as the League of American Wheelmen in 1880. Bicyclists, known then as "wheelmen", were challenged by rutted roads of gravel and dirt and faced antagonism from horsemen, wagon drivers, and pedestrians.

In an effort to improve riding conditions, more than 100,000 cyclists from across the United States joined the League to advocate for paved roads. The success of the League in its first advocacy efforts ultimately led to our national highway system.

Benefits of Bike Riding
People ride bicycles for all sorts of reasons, from better health, to saving money on fuel, and helping the environment. In addition, bike riding is a lot of fun.


Bike Safety - Introduction to Bike Safety 
and Sharing the Road


Danger Rangers Bike Safety PSA


Food Art: Bicycle Built for Two
The song "Bicycle Built for Two" was written in 1892.
The American bicycle history spans over 100 years.


Resource
The League provides education for cyclists, including bicycle safety.To learn more about the League of American Bicyclists, visit their website at http://www.bikeleague.org. 

Thursday, May 18, 2017

May 18, International Museum Day
A Look at Food Museums in the United States

Each year, the International Council of Museums (ICOM) Advisory Committee proposes a theme that can be interpreted by museums to promote their issues within society.

The museum is an institution preserving and communicating the past, yet it is grounded in the present. It is a link between the generations, as it allows present and future generations to better comprehend their origins and history.


Resources.

A Look at Food Museums
in the United States




is a non-profit museum based in New Orleans, Louisiana with a mission to explore the culinary history of the American Southern states, to explain the roots of Southern food and drinks. Their exhibits focus on every aspect of food in the South, from the cultural traditions to the basic recipes and communities formed through food. The museum includes a full service restaurant, a children's gallery, a culinary innovation center, an exhibit for every southern state and a culinary library. While based in New Orleans, the Museum examines and celebrates all the cultures that have come together through the centuries to create the South’s unique culinary heritage. It brings all races and ethnicity to the table to tell the tale, from the farmer and the homemaker to the line cook and the celebrity chef. The Southern Food and Beverage Museum celebrates, interprets, investigates, entertains and preserves. A collaboration of many, the Museum allows food lovers from all areas – Southerners and non-Southerners, locals and tourists, academics and food industry insiders - to pull up their chairs and dig into the food and drink of the South. And although based in New Orleans, they bring a message about the entire South to the world through exhibits, collection of oral histories and videos, and other research. Address: 1504 Oretha Castle Haley Boulevard, New Orleans, Louisiana 70113



is an open air museum in the state park system of California, USA, interpreting the historic cultural landscape of the citrus industry. The park preserves some of the rapidly vanishing cultural landscape of the citrus industry and tells the story of the industry's role in the history and development of California. The park recaptures the time when "Citrus was King" in California, recognizing the importance of the citrus industry in southern California. Park address: 9400 Dufferin Ave., Riverside, CA 92504









The company's Wilbur Chocolate Factory in Lititz sells an assortment of Wilbur chocolates and other candy, and features the free Candy Americana Museum that tells the history of the company and how their chocolate is made. The exhibits include antique chocolate molds, tins and boxes, as well as hand-painted European and Oriental antique porcelain chocolate pots. The museum was created by Penny Buzzard, wife of former Wilbur president John Buzzard, and opened in 1972. Wilbur Chocolate Company, 48 North Broad Street, Lititz, PA 17543




is a museum devoted to the potato, located in Blackfoot, Idaho. The rich graphics showcasing the history of the potato will lead you through the revolution of the potato industry. From the original potato planted in Idaho, to the largest potato crisp made by the Pringle’s Company in Jackson, TN. The Museum represents significant ties between the railroad and the potato industry and was built in 1912. The Potato Museum provides information on potato history, the growing and harvesting process, nutrition, trivia and educational potato facts. The museum is located in downtown Blackfoot, Idaho at 130 NW Main St.  



is a museum in Le Roy, New York dedicated to exhibits about Jell-O, operated by the Le Roy Historical Society. JELL-O Gallery is located at 23 E Main St, Le Roy, NY 14482. The Jell-O Gallery has a large new exhibit that reflects Bill Cosby's influence over thirty years. Also, listen to entertainers, such as Kate Smith, Jack Benny, Lucile Ball as they promote the Jell-O product over the radio air waves. See television personalities Andy Griffith and Gomer Pyle along with Bill Cosby as they pitch about Jell-O.




was established in 1986 to preserve and interpret the maritime history and heritage of Biloxi and the Mississippi Gulf Coast. It accomplishes this mission through an array of exhibits on shrimping, oystering, recreational fishing, wetlands, managing marine resources, charter boats, marine blacksmithing, wooden boat building, net-making, catboats/Biloxi skiff, shrimp peeling machine and numerous historic photographs and objects. In August 2005, the Museum was destroyed by Hurricane Katrina. The Executive Director, Board of Directors and City of Biloxi are working diligently to rebuild the museum. Anticipated date of opening is July 2014. Temporary Museum Office 339 Howard Avenue, Biloxi, MS 39530.





The shrine promotes the dairy industry and records its history. The National Dairy Shrine's museum contains exhibits about the history of dairying. Dairying objects in its collection include butter churns, milking machines, a treadle, and items used in the Babcock test for fat content of milk, which was developed nearby at the University of Wisconsin in Madison. National Dairy Shrine brings together dairy producers, scientists, students, educators, marketers and others who share a desire to preserve our dairy heritage and keep the dairy industry strong. It was founded in 1949. National Dairy Shrine Museum / Hoard Historical Museum, 401 Whitewater Avenue, Fort Atkinson, WI 53538




is a museum in the heart of downtown Middleton, Wisconsin. It boasts a large display of prepared mustards. It is often featured in lists of unusual museums in the United States. 
The museum was conceived and founded by Barry Levenson, former Assistant Attorney General of Wisconsin. It centers on a mustard collection he began in 1986. The initial dozen jars have grown to a collection of more than 5,624 mustards from all 50 states and more than 70 countries. The collection includes exquisite Gibbons Collection of mustard pots to antique tins & jars and vintage advertisements. Address: 7477 Hubbard Avenue, Middleton, WI 53562. 


Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Food Allergy Awareness Week
May 14 -20, 2017


The Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network (FAAN) was founded in 1991 and is the world’s largest nonprofit organization providing information about food allergy to the media, schools, health professionals, the food industry, pharmaceutical companies, and government officials, as well as the food-allergic community.

FAAN’s mission is to raise public awareness, to provide advocacy and education, and to advance research on behalf of all those affected by food allergy and anaphylaxis.

Respect Every Bite


Food Allergy Bullying: It's Not a Joke

In 1997, FAAN created Food Allergy Awareness Week to educate others about food allergies, a potentially life threatening medical condition. This year Food Allergy Awareness Week (FAAW) is May 14-20, 2017.


FAAN’s annual programs, include: Food Allergy Awareness Week, Food Allergy Conferences, Mariel C. Furlong Awards for Making a Difference, Food Allergy News for Kids Poster Contest, Teen Summit, Trick-or-Treat for Food Allergy, Walk for Food Allergy, Kids’ Congress on Capitol Hill.

For further information on FAAN, visit:
YouTube Channel: FAANPAL

Contact Information:
The Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network
(800) 929-4040 
http://www.foodallergy.org/

Monday, May 15, 2017

May 15, 2017 National Women’s Checkup Day, a part of
National Women's Health Week


National Women’s Health Week is organized by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office on Women’s Health (OWH). The goal is to empower women to make their health a top priority. 

There are some women who are so busy caring for their families and others, they neglect to care for themselves. During National Women’s Health Week remind your wife, mother, grandmother, daughter, sister, aunt, and/or girlfriend to take steps to improve their health and prevent disease.


The All-Male Panel on Women's Health: The Daily Show



The annual National Women’s Health Week kicks off on Mother’s Day, May 14.
Dedicate this day to visit or make an appointment with your health care professional. Schedule a check-up. Prevention and early detection are crucial to one’s health. To learn more about National Women's Health Week visit the following links:


Why is it important for women to participate in National Women's Checkup Day?

It is important for women to get regular checkups because: screening tests, such as mammograms and Pap tests, can find diseases early, when they are easier to treat. Some women need certain screening tests earlier, or more often, than others. Screenings and routine care can help women lower their risks of many health conditions, including heart disease.




How can women participate in this important event?
Women can participate in National Women’s Checkup Day by:
Contacting their current health care professional to schedule a checkup and get important screenings on National Women’s Checkup Day.

Discussing with their health care professionals which screenings and tests are right for them, when they should have them, and how often.

Learning which screenings and immunizations they need and at what age at (
http://womenshealth.gov/screening-tests-and-vaccines/screening-tests-for-women/index.html).

For information about participating in National Women’s Checkup Day and other National Women’s Health Week activities, visit the National Women’s Health Week website at https://www.womenshealth.gov/nwhw/ 

Women's Health Month

The information provided here is from the National Women's Health Information Center (NWHIC)

Nutrition.gov News

Dietitian Blog List