Sunday, April 30, 2017

April 30, Mr. Potato Head Celebrates his Birthday
with an Important Health Message


Mr. Potato Head is a beloved American toy. He has gone through many changes, but over the last few years, he has become involved in physical fitness and healthy eating. In this birthday video, Mr. and Mrs. Potato Head share their admiration for the Let’s Move and Kid’s Eat Right campaigns. They discuss cutting back on salt, butter and sour cream and increasing their physical activity.

Mr. Potato Head Celebrates his Birthday
with an Important Health Message



History
Mr. Potato Head was invented by George Lerner in 1949 and first manufactured and distributed by Hasbro in 1952. Mr. Potato Head made his debut on April 30, 1952 as the first toy advertised directly to children on television. Before this, all toy advertising was directed to parents. This commercial revolutionized marketing. Over one million kits were sold in the first year.

In 1952, the original Mr. Potato Head kit provided separate plastic parts to be stuck into a real potato or other vegetables. By 1964, due to government regulations, Hasbro was forced to include a plastic potato "body" in its kits. This change was due to choking hazards and sharp pieces.
          Special Appearances
                 and Awards

1987. Mr. Potato Head gives up his pipe to Surgeon General C. Everett Koop in Washington, D.C. and became the "Spokesspud" for the American Cancer Society's annual "Great American Smokeout" campaign. 

May 1, 1992. Mr. Potato Head turns 40 years old and receives the President's Council for Physical Fitness award at the third annual Great American Workout.

1995. Mr. Potato Head made his Hollywood debut with a leading role in the Disney/Pixar movie, Toy Story.

1996. Mr. and Mrs. Potato Head joined the League of Women Voters and their "Get out the Vote" campaign.

1997 Mr. Potato Head became the "spokesspud" for Burger King’s new French fries campaign.


1999. Mr. and Mrs. Potato Head starred in Toy Story 2.


March 24, 2000. Mr. Potato Head is inducted into the Toy Hall of Fame.


February 12, 2002. Mr. Potato Head rang the opening bell at the New York Stock Exchange.


2002. On his 50th birthday, Mr. Potato Head is awarded his own official AARP card.


2002. The Rhode Island Legislature gave approval to feature Mr. Potato Head on a state auto license plate in order to raise money for charity.


2005. Mr. Potato Head became the national “spokesspud” for the United States Potato Board.


2010. Mr. Potato Head appeared in Toy Story 3.


2011 Hasbro unveils a new, noticeably thinner Mr. Potato Head at the 2011 International Toy Fair convention in New York City.

Vintage Mr. and Mrs. Potato Head Commercial
 

Toy Story 2 Bloopers with
Mr. and Mrs. Potato Head



Resources.
Hasbro, Inc. is a branded play company providing children and families around the world with a wide-range of toys, games and other family entertainment. Hasbro is the manufacturer of Mr. and Mrs. Potato Head. Hasbro has a long tradition of supporting children worldwide through a variety of philanthropic programs.  Their mission is to assist children in triumphing over their life obstacles and to bring the joy of play into their lives.  Visit Hasbro Community Relations to learn about the many programs Hasbro supports.

April 30, National Raisin Day


Raisins are dried grapes. They are fat and cholesterol free; gluten free; naturally low in sodium; a good source of dietary fiber, potassium, and antioxidants.

Raisins contain the phytochemicals, resveratrol and anthocyanin. Studies suggest resveratrol may provide protection against certain cancers, coronary heart disease, and infections. Anthocyanins may reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke; reverse the short-term memory loss associated with aging; reduce the risk of several types of cancer; help control high blood pressure; and help boost the immune system.

Serving Ideas
Eat them plain as a snack or add raisins to
·   Breakfast cereal
·   Yogurt or Ice Cream
·   Baked goods
·   Stuffing, Rice, Pasta
·   Salads
·   Trail Mix

Raisins and Sulfites
Commercially grown dried raisins are often treated with sulfur dioxide during processing in order to extend their shelf life. The sulfites used may cause adverse reactions in people who suffer from asthma.

Federal regulations prohibit the use of sulfites in foods classified as "organic."

Warning.
Raisins can cause renal failure in dogs. The cause is unknown.




1986 - The California Raisins



Growing and Harvesting Raisins

Resources
Fruits and Veggies More Matters: Raisins



Friday, April 28, 2017

National Arbor Day

"Arbor Day is a time to celebrate the wonders of nature, and to plan for an even greener future by planting and caring for trees."

Our Fruit Trees

John Denver - Plant a Tree

While growing up in East Meadow, New York, we had a huge apple tree in our yard. I would climb up the tree and sit on the branches for hours. I loved eating the apples while watching the world below.

When Jake and I moved into our home in 1998 we planted a mango tree. We watched it grow and flourish. Then in 2005, Hurricane Wilma hit and damaged the tree. For years we tried to nurse the tree back to health, but the infection had spread into the roots.

Finally on April 25, 2012, we had the old tree removed; and we replanted a new Valencia pride mango tree.

Planting a fruit tree is good for the environment, economical, and marks  special moments in one’s life.


Visit the Arbor Day Foundation. Resources, membership, free trees and a lot more.

Our Nation's Forests are National Treasures


April 28, World Day for Safety and Health at Work



"Worldwide, occupational diseases continue to be the leading cause of work-related deaths. According to ILO estimates, out of 2.34 million occupational fatalities every year, only 321,000 are due to accidents. The remaining 2.02 million deaths are caused by various types of work-related diseases, which correspond to a daily average of more than 5,500 deaths. This is an unacceptable Decent Work deficit.

The inadequate prevention of occupational diseases has profound negative effects not only on workers and their families but also on society at large due to the tremendous costs that it generates; particularly, in terms of loss of productivity and burdening of social security systems."



On Apr 28, 1970 (signed into law in 1971) was the founding of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).


Safety in Restaurants
Slips and Falls


Foodborne Disease OSHA Standards
Control and Prevention

Control of foodborne diseases is based on avoidance of contaminated food, destruction of contaminants, and prevention of further spread of contaminants. Prevention is dependent upon proper cooking and storing practices, and personal hygiene of food handlers.

The quality of food, and controls used to prevent foodborne diseases, are primarily regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and local public health authorities. These diseases may be occupationally related if they affect the food processors (e.g., poultry processing workers), food preparers and servers (e.g., cooks, waiters), or workers who are provided food at the worksite.

Section 5(a)(1) of the OSHA Act, often referred to as the General Duty Clause, requires employers to "furnish to each of his employees employment and a place of employment which are free from recognized hazards that are causing or are likely to cause death or serious physical harm to his employees". Section 5(a)(2) requires employers to "comply with occupational safety and health standards promulgated under this Act".

Resources
1. Slip, Trip, and Fall Prevention for Healthcare Workers - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health


National Office
U.S. Department of Labor
Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)
200 Constitution Avenue, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20210

Wednesday, April 26, 2017

National Soft Pretzel Month and April 26 National Pretzel Day

In the 20th century, soft pretzels became popular in other regions of the United States. Cities like Philadelphia, Chicago, and New York became renowned for their soft pretzels. The key to success was the introduction of the new mass production methods of the industrialized age, which increased the availability and quantity, and the opening up of multiple points of distribution at schools, convenience and grocery stores, and entertainment venues such as movie theaters, arenas, concert halls, and sport stadiums. Prior to that, street vendors used to sell pretzels on street corners in wooden glass-enclosed cases.



Pretzel Dips

Nutrition Information

Pretzel Recipe: Pizza Pretzel with
Pasta Sauce

In 2003, Pennsylvania Governor, Ed Rendell declares April 26 National Pretzel Day to acknowledge the importance of the pretzel to the state's history and economy.

In particular, the S-shaped soft pretzel, often served with brown mustard, became iconic in Philadelphia and was established as a part of Philadelphia's cuisine for snacking at school, work, or home, and considered by most to be a quick meal. The average Philadelphian today consumes about twelve times as many pretzels as the national average.

Pennsylvania today is the center of American pretzel production for both the hard-crispy and the soft-bread types of pretzels. Southeastern Pennsylvania, with its large population of German background, is considered the birthplace of the American pretzel industry, and many pretzel bakers are still located in the area. Pennsylvania produces 80% of the nation's pretzels.

The annual United States pretzel industry is worth over $550 million. The average American consumes about 1.5 pounds (0.7 kg) of pretzels per year.

The privately run "Pretzel Museum" opened in Philadelphia in 1993. In 2003, Pennsylvania Governor Ed Rendell declared April 26 "National Pretzel Day" to acknowledge the importance of the pretzel to the state's history and economy. Philly Pretzel Factory stores offer a free pretzel to each customer on this day.





Resources
1, Pretzel, From Wikipedia
2. Soft Pretzels, Pinterest

Friday, April 7, 2017

April 7, World Health Day 2017: Depression Let's Talk



World Health Day is celebrated on 7 April. The 2017 theme of the World Health Organization (WHO) is focused on Depression: Let's Talk.  Depression is the leading cause of ill health and disability worldwide. According to the latest estimates from WHO, more than 300 million people are now living with depression, an increase of more than 18% between 2005 and 2015. Lack of support for people with mental disorders, coupled with a fear of stigma, prevent many from accessing the treatment they need to live healthy, productive lives.

 World Health Day 2017 - WHO: Depression - Let's Talk




One of the first steps is to address issues around prejudice and discrimination. “The continuing stigma associated with mental illness was the reason why we decided to name our campaign Depression: let’s talk,” said Dr Shekhar Saxena, Director of the Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse at WHO. “For someone living with depression, talking to a person they trust is often the first step towards treatment and recovery.”

Associated Health Risks

WHO has identified strong links between depression and other noncommunicable disorders and diseases. Depression increases the risk of substance use disorders and diseases such as diabetes and heart disease; the opposite is also true, meaning that people with these other conditions have a higher risk of depression.

Depression is also an important risk factor for suicide, which claims hundreds of thousands of lives each year. Said Dr Saxena: “A better understanding of depression and how it can be treated, while essential, is just the beginning. What needs to follow is sustained scale-up of mental health services accessible to everyone, even the most remote populations in the world.”

Depression is a common mental illness characterized by persistent sadness and a loss of interest in activities that people normally enjoy, accompanied by an inability to carry out daily activities, for 14 days or longer.


In addition, people with depression normally have several of the following: a loss of energy; a change in appetite; sleeping more or less; anxiety; reduced concentration; indecisiveness; restlessness; feelings of worthlessness, guilt, or hopelessness; and thoughts of self-harm or suicide.

Resources 

Nutrition.gov News

Dietitian Blog List