Thursday, June 29, 2017

Mango, Tomato, and Green Onion Salad

 Mango, Tomato, and Green Onion Salad


Ingredients
1/3 cup Mango
1/2 cup Tomato, diced
2 Tbsp Green Onions





Nutrition Information




Mango, Tomato, and Green Onion Salad
with Breadstick



Ingredients
1/3 cup Mango
1/2 cup Tomato, diced
2 Tbsp Green Onions
1 Breadstick

Nutrition Information

Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Potty Training Awareness Month
Preventing Constipation


June is Potty Training Awareness Month. Constipation in children is a common problem when potty training. Constipation is often characterized by infrequent bowel movements or hard, dry stools.

Causes of Constipation in Children

Toilet Training and Withholding. Your child may ignore the urge to have a bowel movement because of fear of the toilet or they don’t want to take a play break. Some children withhold when they are away from home because they are embarrassed to use a public bathroom. Withholding bowel movements sometimes results in a large painful mass of stool in the rectum called a fecal impaction. If it hurts to have a bowel movement, your child may try to avoid a repeat of the uncomfortable situation. If you begin toilet training too early, children may hold in there stools, which can quickly become an involuntary habit that's tough to break.

Dietary Changes. Lack of fruits and vegetables or fluid in your child's diet may cause constipation. For some children, too much milk and not enough water can lead to constipation.

Medication or Disease. Certain antacids, antidepressants, muscle relaxants and various other drugs can contribute to constipation. Changes in your child's appetite or diet due to illness may have the same effect.

Emotional Pressure to use the toilet or to give up diapers.

Symptoms of constipation in children
*Fewer bowel movements than usual.
*The child is fidgeting, clenching buttocks muscles or other unusual dancelike behaviors.
*Experiencing Abdominal pain and cramping.
*Painful or difficult bowel movements.
*Hard, dry, or large stools.
*Feces in the child’s underwear.

Prevention of constipation in children
*Offer high-fiber foods. Include: Fruits and Vegetables; Beans and Lentils; Bran sprinkled on cereals or yogurt; Whole grain bread and cereal; Dried or soft fruit added to muffins or cereal; Fruit spread

If your child does not like vegetables, serve them hidden in casseroles, pastas or puree in soups. Ask your child to help out when preparing meals. Children are more willing to eat their food if they play a role in making their own meals.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends the following amounts of fiber needed per age and gender. Pediatric Nutrition Handbook, 6th ed. Elk Grove Village (IL): American Academy of Pediatrics; 2009
Age/Gender            Fiber (grams)
2 - 3 years                       19
4 – 8 years                       25
9 – 11 years (female)       26
9 – 11 years (male)          31

*Encourage your child to drink plenty of fluids. Water is the best choice.
*Establish regular meal and snack times
*Promote physical activity. Regular physical activity helps stimulate normal bowel function.
*Create a toilet schedule. Set aside time after meals for your child to use the toilet.
*Remind your child to use the bathroom.
*Ask your doctor if your child is taking any medication that may cause constipation.

Treatment of Constipation in Children
*Follow the prevention instructions.
*Consult with the pediatrician or family doctor before using over-the-counter suppositories or laxatives.
*Contact the doctor if four or five days have passed without a bowel movement, or if constipation is accompanied by abdominal pain, vomiting or fever.
*Consult a dietitian who can help create an appropriate food plan high in fiber.

Resouces
Foods to Boost Your Child’s Fiber, Nourish Interactive (pdf)
American Academy of Pediatrics
International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

This young child describes his concerns about Potty Training
 

 Potty Training Tips from Parents TV - For Mom
 

Elmo and his Father show How
Potty Time Can Be Fun: Sesame Street
 
 


The information presented here does not constitute medical advice for any individual. Specific cases may vary. Dietitians-Online and Weighing-Success recommends readers consult a qualified health professional on an individual basis. All materials are provided for your information only and may not be construed as medical advice or instruction. Readers should consult appropriate health professionals on any matter relating to their health and well-being.


Monday, June 26, 2017

Meatless Monday - History and Nutrition of Quinoa with Recipe

“Quinoa is considered to be the organic food of the future and holds great potential in efforts to eradicate poverty worldwide and provide global food security and nutrition.” United Nations.


Quinoa´s biodiversity and nutritional value play an important role in providing food security, nutrition, and the eradication of poverty. 


Quinoa is a grain-like crop grown primarily for its edible seeds. It is a pseudo-cereal rather than a true cereal, or grain. Quinoa originated over 3,000 years ago in the Andean region of Ecuador, Bolivia, Colombia and Peru. 



Quinoa Nutritional Information

Quinoa is high in protein, a good source of dietary fiber and phosphorus and is high in magnesium and iron. Quinoa is also gluten-free.

Preparation. Quinoa has a natural bitter-tasting coating called saponins. Most quinoa sold commercially has been processed to remove this coating. However, the directions may require additional rinsing before cooking.

Quinoa can be added to a wide variety of dishes and substituted in recipes using rice or couscous. Quinoa flour can be used in wheat-free and gluten-free baking. To enhance the flavor, stock can be exchanged for water during cooking. Quinoa also can provide a nutritious breakfast with the addition of honey, nuts or fruits.


Quinoa with Berries



Ingredients
1/2 cup Quinoa Salad, prepared
1/2 cup Blueberries and Raspberries




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Sunday, June 25, 2017

June 25, National Strawberry Parfait Day

June 25 is designated as National Strawberry Parfait Day. Parfaits are associated with high calories, but with portion planning you can turn a parfait into a healthy snack.

Strawberry Parfait with Granola

Ingredients.
1/4 cup Light Strawberry Ice Cream
1 Tablespoon Granola
1/4 cup Strawberries, chopped
1/2 cup Strawberries

Nutrition Information



Strawberry Parfait with
Frozen Strawberry Yogurt and Granola

Ingredients.
1/3 cup Light Frozen Strawberry Yogurt
2 Tablespoon Granola
1/4 cup Strawberries, chopped
1/2 cup Strawberries
1.5 teaspoons Strawberry Preserves

Nutrition Information. 165 Calories; 3 g Protein; 34 g Carbohydrates; 2 g Dietary Fiber; 3 g Fat (g); 7 mg Cholesterol; 49 mg Vitamin C; 120 mcg Folate; 48 mg Sodium

Tuesday, June 20, 2017

June 20, National Vanilla Milkshake Day


   Vanilla Milkshake Makeover


       


Vanilla Milkshake, an all-time favorite does not have to be loaded with calories, fat, cholesterol and sugar.

Today’s recipe makeover transforms Paula Deen’s Vanilla Milkshake into a healthier alternative.


Vanilla Milkshake Makeover
Nutrition
Information
Paula Deen's Vanilla MilkshakeVanilla Milkshake MakeoverMakeover Savings
Calories718148570
Carbohydrates (g)732251
Total Sugars (g)731756
Fat (g) 403.536.5
Cholesterol (mg)25222230
Sodium (mg)19311083

Vanilla Milkshake (Original)
Recipe by Paula Deen
Serves 4

Ingredients
4 cups quality vanilla ice cream
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
8 tablespoons sugar
2 cups milk, less for thicker milkshakes

Directions
Using a blender or milkshake machine, blend all ingredients together until smooth. Serve in tall glasses with a straw.

Nutrition Information
Calories (kcal) 718; Carbohydrates (g) 73; Total Sugars (g) 73; 
Fat (g) 40; Cholesterol (mg) 252; Sodium (mg) 193


Vanilla Milkshake (Makeover)
Serves 4, serving size 8 ounces

Ingredients
2 cups vanilla ice cream (light, used Edy's)
1 teaspoons vanilla extract
2 cups skim milk
Artificial sweetner to taste (optional)
Crushed Ice, as needed for a thicker shake

Directions
Using a blender, blend all ingredients together until smooth. Serve in eight ounce glasses with a straw.

Nutrition Information
Calories (kcal) 148; Carbohydrates (g) 22; Total Sugars (g) 17; 
Fat (g) 3.5; Cholesterol (mg) 22; Sodium (mg) 110

Sunday, June 11, 2017

Multicultural American Child Awareness Day

Today is a wonderful day to celebrate the many cultural foods that makeup the American Cuisine. The diversity can be seen as we travel across the country. There are regional differences and the influences of immigrants from all over the world.






New England is known for seafood, particularly lobster, and a creamy clam chowder. The Southern states are known for collard greens (leafy greens), chicken and dumplings, black eyed peas and cornbread. Grits is a popular breakfast dish in the South. The Midwest has traditionally been a beef and grain producing area so meats, potatoes and breads are foods found there. In the Pacific Northwest fresh salmon is a specialty and in the Southwest, the Mexican influence can be seen. California and Hawaii are both known for growing many different fruits, and Alaska is known for its fish and King Crab.

As a nation of immigrants, our foods have expanded to include worldwide cuisines, traditions, and religious influences. Many ethnic dishes are joining the American food culture and are seeing an incredible boost in familiarity, approval and consumption.



Foods from All Over the World




Healthy Choices
Table of Cuisines (from Menu Solutions)


Cuisine
Healthier Choices
Limit
Delicatessen Selections
Extra lean corned beef, pastrami, or roast beef, beef brisket, and turkey breast are best; whole wheat or multi-grain breads; chicken or tuna salad; chopped herring; chef salad; fresh fruit plate with cottage cheese; dry bagel; borscht or broth soup; tossed salad, sliced tomatoes, beet salad, or carrot raisin salad.
High-fat meats (regular corn beef, hot pastrami, beef bologna, hot dogs, knockwurst, liverwurst, and salami); potato salad; mayonnaise based salads; combo sandwiches (Reuben); smoked fish (lox); creamy coleslaw; chopped liver; excess cream cheese and cheese spreads; sauerkraut (high in sodium).
Pizza Parlor Selections
You cannot go wrong by ordering extra toppings such as onions, peppers, mushrooms, tomato slices, broccoli and spinach. Other possibilities include chicken, crab meat, or shrimp.  
Fat starts with the basic cheese, so avoid extra cheese and in particular mozzarella. Other culprits include bacon, meatballs, pepperoni, sausage, and prosciutto, as well as anchovies.
Sandwich Shop Selections
Both 100% whole wheat and pita bread are great choices. Good sandwich fillers are grilled chicken breast, ham, roast beef, and turkey breast. Instruct the server not to add butter, margarine, or mayonnaise to the bread and substitute with ketchup, mustard, or horseradish. Good salad choices include chef, garden, or Greek salads, but remember to ask for low-calorie dressings on the side and to omit egg or cheese. Broth-type soups are good, such as barley, beef, chicken, lentil, split pea, and vegetable noodle.
Avoid croissants, cheese, excess mayonnaise, egg, and creamy soups. Beware of "diet plates" with big burgers and scoops of cottage cheese, which have loads of saturated fat. Omit cheeseburgers, cheese sandwiches, or grilled cheese "melts" over chicken and seafood salads; and cold cuts. Combo sandwiches with meat and cheese and club sandwiches are best avoided due to the large portion size.Remember that salad combos such as tuna, chicken, and crab meat have lots of mayonnaise. Avoid creamy soups such as chowders or cream of "anything."
Submarine Shop Selections
Order the smaller size roll or pita bread. Turkey, smoked turkey, ham, and roast beef are acceptable. Ask the server to go light on the meats, omit the mayonnaise or oil, and generously load up on the shredded lettuce, onion, peppers, pickles, and sliced tomatoes. Choose salads as alternatives when available, such as chef or tossed salads with perhaps a scoop of tuna, chicken, or seafood served with Italian or pita bread. 
Omit meats such as bologna, Italian cold cuts, salami (hard or Genoa) and sausages. Stay away from cheeses and steak and cheese. Other items to omit include antipasto salads, fried eggplant, and chicken cutlets.
Chinese Selections
Order plain steamed rice; boiled, steamed, or stir-fried vegetables (ask for little oil to be used); moderate fish and shellfish; non-fried tofu; skinless poultry and egg roll (insides only).
Anything fried (rice or crispy noodles), or with sweet and sour sauce; egg dishes or soups; salty soups; avoid duck and limit beef, pork and picked foods; excess soy sauce; ask chef to leave out MSG and cut down the use of commonly used corn starch, sugar, and salt.
Indian Selections
Order chutney (except mango); curry sauce (yogurt based); fish (omit butter basting); yogurt with shredded vegetables; basmati rice. Biryani (vegetable dish); chapatti or papadum bread; tandoori chicken; lentil or mulligatawny soups
Creamy or high-salt soups; clarified butter (ghee); deep fried meats; poori or paratha bread; fried samosa or pakora; ask to prepare dishes without excess salt and to omit coconut milk, if possible; omit garnishes with nuts or dried fruit.
Italian Selections
Order antipasto (no oil or excess meats); crusty bread (no oil or butter); broiled or grilled fish, seafood, chicken, and meats; garlic; plain or vegetable pasta; fresh unsalted mozzarella cheese; steamed leafy vegetables (kale and broccoli); salads; fresh tomatoes; zucchini; ices.
Garlic bread; stuffed pastas (ravioli and lasagna); fried eggplant; meatballs or sausage; sauces with butter, cream, oil, and wine base; pesto sauce; cheese-filled or parmesan style dishes; spumoni or tortoni ice cream. Beware of risotto rice; polenta; and high-fat, high-sodium prosciutto ham and pancetta; veal cutlets and Caesar salads.
Japanese Selections
Order rice; steamed fish; sushi; sashimi; miso soup; raw vegetables; tofu; sukiyaki (stir-fried); yakimono (broiled fish).
Tempura and other deep-fried food; excess peanut and teriyaki sauce; pickled foods; excess salt and sugar in sauces; excess salt in soy marinades and sauces.
Mediterranean (Middle East) Selections
Order couscous, bulgar, and pita bread; legumes such as chickpeas, fava beans, and lentils; hummus; grape leaves; yogurt.
Phyllo dough dishes for sweet desserts such as baklava; feta and kasseri cheese; excess anchovies and olives; high sodium foods; feta, olives and sausage; appetizers in general, except salads; excess fat from butter, olive oil, omelet's and tahini.
Mexican Selections
Order soft-shell tacos; burritos; fajitas; salsa; chicken enchilada; black beans or Mexican rice; grilled fish or chicken; salads without chips or shells; moderate corn or flour tortilla, using minimal oil; cerviche (marinated fish); gazpacho; chile con carne soup, with no cheese. Acceptable items include shredded lettuce; spicy meats; diced tomatoes; salsa verde; picante or tomato sauce; use Mexican salads as appetizers, with salsa as the dressing.
Chips, nachos; super nachos; chili con queso; fried taco or tortilla shells; guacamole; sour cream; cheese; refried beans; beef and pork dishes; olives; items such as chilies rellenos, chimichangas, chorizo (sausage), and flautas.
Thai Selections
Order steamed rice; broth-based soups (tom yum koang and pok taek); non-fried proteins, such as chicken, seafood, and tofu; vegetables; satay or steamed mussels; salads with light dressings, made with Thai spices.
Excess sodium; soy sauce and sugar; MSG; coconut milk, coconut oil; cream dishes, high milk and sodium soups; many fried appetizers; curry or curry sauce; fried eggplant; cashew and peanut toppings.

Resources
1. Multicultural American Child Awareness Day


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