Wednesday, August 9, 2017

August 9, International Day of the
World's Indigenous People
Education


Symbol for the Indigenous People of the World was created by Rebang Dewan, a Chakma boy from Bangladesh. It features two ears of green leaves facing each other and cradling a globe resembling planet earth. Within the globe is a picture of a handshake (two different hands) in the middle and above the handshake is a landscape background. The handshake and the landscape background are encapsulated by blue at the top and bottom within the globe. In the graphic above, I attempted to recreate the symbol using foods.

"On this International Day of the World's Indigenous Peoples, I call on Governments everywhere to draw on the guidance of this international framework to improve access to education for indigenous peoples and to reflect their experiences and culture in places of learning.  Let us commit to ensuring indigenous peoples are not left behind as we pursue the vision of the Sustainable Development Goals. - Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon on
International Day of the World's Indigenous People


Indigenous Peoples can feed the world



2017 Theme: 10th Anniversary of the 

UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

Ten years ago, on 13 September 2007, the General Assembly adopted the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, a major milestone with respect to the cooperation and solidarity between indigenous peoples and Member States.

The Declaration is the most comprehensive international instrument on the rights of indigenous peoples. It embodies global consensus on the rights of indigenous peoples and establishes a universal framework of minimum standards for their survival, dignity and well-being. It elaborates on existing human rights standards and fundamental freedoms, as they apply to the specific situation of indigenous peoples.

Over the last decade, the implementation of the Declaration has achieved some major successes in at the national, regional and international levels. Despite the achievements, there continues to be a gap between the formal recognition of indigenous peoples and the implementation of policies on the ground.


Article 42 of the Declaration explicitly refers to the role of the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues in promoting respect for and full appreciation of the provisions of the Declaration. To draw attention to the progress made and remaining challenges in implementing the Declaration, the sixteenth session of the Permanent Forum will have a special thematic focus on the tenth anniversary of the Declaration. The tenth anniversary will also be the focus of a high-level event to be convened by the President of the 71st session of the United Nations General Assembly on 25 April 2017 in New York to take stock of the achievements, assess challenges and consider further follow-up to the Declaration.

Goal 4 of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development calls for ensuring equal access to all levels of education and vocational training for the vulnerable, including persons with disabilities, indigenous peoples and children in vulnerable situations.

In spite of these instruments, the right to education has not been fully realized for most indigenous peoples, and a critical education gap exists between indigenous peoples and the general population.

Where data exist, they show consistent and persistent disparities between the indigenous and the non-indigenous population in terms of educational access, retention and achievement, in all regions of the world.

The education sector not only mirrors the historical abuses, discrimination and marginalization suffered by indigenous peoples, but also reflects their continued struggle for equality and respect for their rights as peoples and as individuals.

It is also a reminder of the responsibility of individuals as consumers, to understand that there is a story and a personal experience behind every food, piece of cloth, textile or artwork from an indigenous individual or community.


Eat Traditional Foods, Fight Diabetes



The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations, Centre for Indigenous Peoples’ Nutrition and Environment (Rome 2009) prepared a documentary, called the Food Systems of Indigenous Peoples.

This book seeks to define and describe the diversity in food systems, nutrition and health in 12 rural case studies of Indigenous Peoples in different parts of the world as a window to global Indigenous Peoples’ circumstances.


A procedure for documenting Indigenous Peoples’ food systems was developed by researchers working with the Centre for Indigenous Peoples’ Nutrition and Environment (CINE) at McGill University, Canada, and the FAO. The procedure was adapted and applied in case studies located in Canada, Japan, Peru, India, Nigeria, Colombia, Thailand, Kenya, and the Federated States of Micronesia. The collective intent of this documentation is to show the inherent strengths of the local traditional food systems, how people think about and use these foods, the influx of industrial and purchased food, and the circumstances of the nutrition transition in indigenous communities. This research was completed with both qualitative and quantitative methods by Indigenous Peoples and their academic partners in the context of the second International Decade of the World’s Indigenous Peoples, and the Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples adopted in 2007 by the General Assembly of the United Nations.

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