Thursday, July 17, 2014

Kids Eat Right Month Spotlights ‘Hungry-Overweight Paradox’

FOR RELEASE JULY 17, 2014

 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Encourages Policies 
that Provide Consistent Access to Nutrient-rich Food

KidsEatRight.orgCHICAGO – It may seem like a contradiction, but millions of American children are both hungry and overweight. During Kids Eat Right Month, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics spotlights the “hungry yet overweight paradox” and ways to ensure children meet their nutrient requirements and maintain a healthy weight.

“Kids Eat Right Month provides us with a valuable opportunity to shed light on one of the most serious social and health issues related to childhood obesity – the ‘hungry yet overweight paradox’ of food insecurity that threatens the health of the nation’s children,” says registered dietitian nutritionist and Academy Spokesperson Angela Lemond.

Kids Eat Right Month focuses on the importance of healthful eating and active lifestyles for children and families, featuring expert advice from registered dietitian nutritionists. The Kids Eat Right initiative, created in 2010 by the Academy and its charitable Foundation, offers resources and information for Academy members and the public to encourage nutritious, healthful eating among children and families.

More than one in five kids lives in a food-insecure household, meaning their family’s income doesn’t allow for consistent access to food. “Meanwhile, a child can look overweight while still being hungry for nutrients because limited income leads to a trade-off between food quantity and food quality,” Lemond says.

“Individuals and families experiencing food insecurity often experience periods of time when they have full pantries, followed by periods without. When food is available, many children eat a healthy and steady diet, though some may overeat due to fear of lacking food in the future. When food is not available, children’s diets may be minimal or they may have to skip meals altogether. These wide swings in calorie consumption affect their metabolism and promote fat storage,” Lemond says.

The hungry-overweight paradox leads to serious, long-term health consequences. Children who are food-insecure are more likely to have iron deficiency, asthma, delayed cognitive development, increased stomachaches, headaches, colds and increased fatigue. “To successfully address the hungry-overweight paradox, the Academy supports programs and practices that combat hunger and malnutrition, encourage food security, promote self-sufficiency, educate consumers and health professionals, and are environmentally and economically sustainable,” Lemond says.
“Long-term, lasting solutions to the hungry-overweight paradox must include research, innovative and creative initiatives that show children and adults alike the benefits of good nutrition, and improving access to nutritious food for all people,” she says. 

Registered dietitian nutritionists help in developing school and workplace policies, community programs and cooking and shopping strategies for families and individuals. “The Academy and our members are strong advocates for programs that have been proven effective in reducing food insecurity and nourishing children, including school meal programs and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP,” Lemond says.

For more information about high-quality nutrition and balanced eating plans for kids, or to download the Academy’s Nourish to Flourish infographic, visit www.KidsEatRight.org.

###

All registered dietitians are nutritionists – but not all nutritionists are registered dietitians. The Academy’s Board of Directors and Commission on Dietetic Registration have determined that those who hold the credential registered dietitian (RD) may optionally use “registered dietitian nutritionist” (RDN) instead. The two credentials have identical meanings.

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is the world’s largest organization of food and nutrition professionals. The Academy is committed to improving the nation’s health and advancing the profession of dietetics through research, education and advocacy. Visit the Academy at www.eatright.org.


The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Foundation is a 501(c)3 charity devoted exclusively to nutrition and dietetics. It funds scholarships and awards, public awareness and research projects and Academy strategic initiatives, and is the largest provider of scholarships and awards in the field of dietetics. Visit the Academy Foundation at www.eatright.org/foundation.

Friday, June 20, 2014

June 20, Take Your Dog To Work Day
Health Benefits of Having a Dog





Pet Sitters International’s Take Your Dog To Work Day® was created to celebrate the great companions dogs make and to encourage their adoption from humane societies, animal shelters and breed rescue clubs. This annual event asks pet lovers to celebrate the humane-canine bond and promote pet adoption by encouraging employers to support “Take Your Dog to Work Day”.

On Friday June 21, 2013 businesses, animal shelters and pet-care professionals from around the world will work together to better the lives of shelter dogs everywhere. Pet Sitters International invites your business to participate in this fun and worthwhile event.

For nearly 25 years, research has shown that living with pets provides certain health benefits. Pets help lower blood pressure and lessen anxiety. They boost our immunity. "Studies have shown that Alzheimer's patients have fewer anxious outbursts if there is an animal in the home," says Lynette Hart, PhD, associate professor at the University of California at Davis School of Veterinary Medicine.
Health Benefits of a Dog

Studies have found that:

• Pet owners are less likely to suffer from depression than those without pets.
• People with pets have lower blood pressure in stressful situations than those without pets.
• Playing with a pet can elevate levels of serotonin and dopamine, which calm and relax.
• Pet owners have lower triglyceride and cholesterol levels than those without pets.
• Heart attack patients with pets survive longer than those without.
• Pet owners over age 65 make 30 percent fewer visits to their doctors than those without pets.

Caring for a pet can help 
with those healthy lifestyle changes by:
• Increasing exercise. Exercise doesn’t have to involve boring repetition at a gym. Taking a dog for a walk, riding a horse, or simply chasing a kitten around are fun ways to fit healthy daily exercise into your schedule.
• Providing companionship. Isolation and loneliness can make disorders such as depression even worse. Caring for a living animal can help make you feel needed and wanted, and take the focus away from your problems. Most pet owners talk to their pets, some even use them to work through their troubles.
• Helping meet new people. Pets can be a great social lubricant for their owners. Dog owners frequently stop and talk to each other on walks or in a dog park. Pet owners also meet new people in pet stores, clubs, and training classes.
• Reducing anxiety. The companionship of a dog can offer comfort, help ease anxiety, and build self-confidence for people anxious about going out into the world.
• Adding structure and routine to your day. Many pets, especially dogs, require a regular feeding and exercise schedule. No matter your mood—depressed, anxious, or stressed—you’ll always have to get out of bed to feed, exercise, and care for your pet.
• Providing sensory stress relief. Touch and movement are two healthy ways to quickly manage stress. This could involve petting a cat or taking a dog for a walk.

Pets and older adults
The key to aging well is to effectively handle life’s major changes, such as retirement, the loss of loved ones, and the physical changes of aging. Pets can play an important role in healthy aging by:
• Helping you find meaning and joy in life. As you age, you’ll lose things that previously occupied your time and gave your life purpose. You may retire from your career or your children may move far away. Caring for a pet can bring pleasure and help boost your morale and optimism. Taking care of an animal can also provide a sense of self-worth.
• Staying connected. Maintaining a social network isn’t always easy as you grow older. Retirement, illness, death, and moves can take away close friends and family members. And making new friends can get harder. Dogs especially are a great way for seniors to spark up conversations and meet new people.
• Boosting vitality. You can overcome many of the physical challenges associated with aging by taking good care of yourself. Pets encourage playfulness, laughter, and exercise, which can help boost your immune system and increase your energy.





Resources and References
Facebook. Take your dog to work
5 Ways Pets Can Improve Your Health
The Therapeutic Benefits of Pets
Take Your Dog To Work Day
Pet Sitters International


Monday, June 16, 2014

June, National Papaya Month

The papaya is also known as papaw or pawpaw.  The papaya is a melon like fruit with yellow-orange flesh. The skin varies in color from green to orange. Papayas are a good source of vitamin A, vitamin C, and dietary fiber.


The ripe fruit of the papaya is usually eaten raw, with or without skin or seeds. The unripe green papaya can be eaten cooked.  




Recipe
Papaya Salad with Tomatoes, Onions,
Peppers, Brown Rice, Black Beans







In the Disney film, The Jungle Book (1967), 
Baloo sings the song "The Bare Necessities."
Can you locate the papaya in the song?

Resources
Fruits and Veggies, More Matters. Papaya
Wikipedia, Carica papaya


Monday, May 5, 2014

May 5, National Hoagie Day Meets Cinco de Mayo

There are different stories about how the hoagie was discovered, but most of them originate out of the Philadelphia area. The sandwich contains various meats, cheeses, and lettuce in between 2 slices of bread or a loaf cut in half.


Hoagie Meets Cinco de Mayo

Ingredients
1.5 oz Whole Wheat Roll
20 g (3/4 oz) Salami
1/2 oz Monterey Jack Cheese
1/2 oz Turkey Bread
Salsa
Jalapeno
Red Peppers
Tomato Slice
Shredded Lettuce

Monday, April 21, 2014

IBS Awareness Month - Guest Blogger: Patsy Catsos, MS, RD, LD



Irritable Bowel Syndrome now More
Treatable with Diet than Ever Before

Is it just me, or are more people talking about irritable bowel syndrome these days? Could it be that IBS is coming out of the (water) closet? It’s always been a difficult subject to talk about, due to its “indelicate” nature. Although very common, affecting up to 20% of Americans, IBS will probably never make great dinner party conversation. Nor does it make for pleasant gossip around the water cooler, though it is the second leading cause of absenteeism in the workplace after the common cold. Some people even hesitate to discuss their symptoms with their health care providers; after all, there has never been much you could do about IBS—it’s one of those things you just have to learn to live with, isn’t it?

Not anymore! If you’ve been suffering from gastrointestinal symptoms that interfere with your work, exercise or social life, discuss them with your primary care provider; many new treatment approaches have become available in the past few years.

People with IBS have digestive systems that don’t function properly, though nothing seems to be medically wrong. IBS symptoms can include excess gas, bloating, abdominal pain, diarrhea and or constipation. Some people with IBS experience alternating diarrhea and constipation.

It’s important not to self-diagnose, because the symptoms are not specific to IBS. Your doctor might be able to make a diagnosis simply by running some basic blood work and comparing the pattern of your symptoms and history to established diagnostic criteria. Make a list of your symptoms and bring it to your appointment. When did they start? What seems to bring them on? If you have any so-called alarm symptoms, your doctor may refer you to a specialist such as a gynecologist or a gastroenterologist to rule out other conditions before settling on a diagnosis of IBS. Alarm symptoms might include passing blood; fever; unexplained weight loss; onset of symptoms after age 50; poor growth or failure to thrive (in children); incontinence; or family history of Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, celiac disease, ovarian or colon cancer.

If you are diagnosed with IBS, you and your doctor might discuss various treatment options. There are a variety of pharmaceuticals that can be prescribed (anti-spasmodics, anti-diarrheals, anti-depressants, and laxatives). Several new drugs have come on the market in the past year or two to help people who suffer from constipation. However, many people are interested in managing things more naturally, with lifestyle and diet. Most people with IBS are advised to start with the basics: regular meals, adequate fluids, better food choices including lots of high-fiber foods, and regular physical activity. High fiber diets and fiber supplements have been the mainstay of dietary advice for many, many years. Unfortunately, many people with IBS find that eating more fruits, vegetables, whole grains and fiber-fortified foods doesn’t help, or makes their symptoms worse.

That’s where the latest research on nutrition and IBS comes in. Rather than following one-size-fits-all diet advice for IBS, patients today are being encouraged to experiment with their diets. The FODMAP approach, in particular, can help up to 75% of patients with IBS learn to manage their symptoms, and is particularly effective with the guidance of a registered dietitian nutritionist. FODMAPs are certain sugars and certain fibers in the diet that are capable of causing symptoms because they are rapidly fermentable by the normal bacteria that live in the gut, which causes the IBS sufferer to have excess gas and painful bloating. FODMAPs can also pull extra fluid into the gut, causing bouts of diarrhea. During a FODMAP-elimination diet, FODMAP-containing foods are first eliminated, then reintroduced in a carefully planned way to identify which FODMAPs are tolerated and which are not. This evidence-based dietary approach was developed by researchers at Monash University, in Australia, and is now in use world-wide. Other types of adverse reactions to food are also possible. IBS symptoms for some individuals might be triggered by the way their immune systems react to particular foods, natural food chemicals or food additives.

While diet is unlikely to the cause or the cure of IBS, appropriate food choices can certainly help most people manage their symptoms. If you have IBS, I think you’ll agree that’s important. Don’t settle for learning to live with your symptoms. You deserve a chance to find the diet that’s right for you.

Patsy Catsos, MS, RD, LD is a medical nutrition therapist, and author of IBS—Free at Last! and the Flavor without FODMAPs Cookbook. For further information about Patsy Catsos, MS, RDN, LD you can find her at the following links:

Web: http://www.ibsfree.net
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/ibsfree
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/CatsosIBSFreeRD
Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/pcatsos



Patsy’s book links on Amazon.com:



Other resources:
1. International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders, Inc. http://www.aboutibs.org
2. The Rome Foundation, http://www.romecriteria.org/

3. FODMAPs: Profound Help for Symptoms of IBS (video)  http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/770381

Tuesday, March 18, 2014

National Nutrition Month
Enjoy the taste of a variety of foods and colors


Eat Right with Colors
Music: The Wonderful World of Color, Walt Disney and Disney World.

March is National Nutrition Month® (NNM), a nutrition education and information campaign created annually by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The campaign focuses attention on the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits. 

Eat right with colors explores the health benefits associated with eating foods of many colors. Including color diversity in your meals and food choices enhances your intake of a wide range of nutrients. 

Red and Pink Foods
Apples, Beets, Cayenne, Cherries, Cranberries, Guava, Kidney Beans, Papaya, Pink Beans, Pink/Red Grapefruit, Pomegranates, Radicchio, Radishes, Raspberries, Red Bell Peppers, Red Cabbages, Red Chili Peppers, Red Corn, Red Currants, Red Grapes, Red Onions, Red Pears, Red Peppers, Red Plums, Red Potatoes, Red Tomatoes, Rhubarb, Strawberries, Tomatoes, Watermelons

Green Foods
Alfalfa, Artichokes, Arugula, Asparagus, Avocado, Bok Choy, Broccoli, Broccoli rabe, Brussels Sprouts, Celery, Chives, Collard Greens, Cucumbers, Dandelion Greens, Edamame, Endive, Fennel, Green apples, Green Beans, Green cabbage, Green Grapes, Green Olives, Green Onion, Green Pears, Green Peas, Green Pepper, Green Tomatoes, Honeydew, Kale, Kiwi, Leeks, Lettuce, Limes, Mint, Okra, Oregano, Parsley, Pistachios, Snow Peas, Spinach, Sugar snap peas, Swiss Chard, Tarragon, Tomatillo, Wasabi, Watercress, Zucchini

Blue and Purple Foods
Blue Grapes, Blue and Purple Potatoes, Blueberries, Dried Plums, Plums, Eggplant, Pomegranates, Elderberries, Juniper Berries, Kelp (Seaweed), Purple Belgian Endive, Purple Cabbage, Purple Figs

Yellow and Orange Foods
Apricots, Bananas, Butternut Squash, Cantaloupe, Carrots, Cheddar Cheese, Citrus Fruits, Clementines, Corn, Creamsicle, Garbanzo Beans, Golden Apples, Golden Flax Seed, Golden Raisins, Grapefruit, Honey, Lemon, Lemongrass, Mandarin Oranges, Mangoes, Nectarines, Orange Jello, Orange Peppers, Orange Tomatoes, Oranges, Papaya, Parsnips, Peaches, Pears, Persimmons, Pineapple, Pumpkin, Rutabagas, Saffron, Salmon, Spaghetti Squash, Squash Blossoms, Sweet Corn, Sweet Potatoes, Tangerines, Whole Grains, Yams, Yellow Apples, Yellow Beans, Yellow Peppers, Yellow Summer Squash, Yellow Wax Beans

White and Black Foods
White: Cauliflower, Coconut, Garlic, Ginger, Green Onions, Scallions, Horseradish, Jicama, Kohlrabi, Leeks, Millet, Mushrooms, Onions, Parsnips, Quinoa, Shallots, Soy Products, Sunflower Seeds, Tofu, Turnips, White Beans, White Corn, White Sesame Seeds

Black: Black Beans, Black Cherries, Black Currants, Black Mushrooms, Black Olives, Black Quinoa, Black Raspberry, Black Rice, Black Sesame Seeds, Black Soybeans, Blackberries, Boysenberries, Prunes, Raisins, Seaweeds, Tamari (Soy Sauce)



Wellness News employs adults with "Special Needs" (Cerebral Palsy, Autism, Down Syndrome, Muscular Dystrophy). Many of the photographs are available for purchase with the proceeds going to special need adults. Contact Dr. Sandra Frank for additional information (recipenews@gmail.com).

 
Prepared by
http://www.dietitians-online.com/
http://www.weighing-success.com/
Wellness News (www.weighing-success.com/WellnessNews.html)
http://www.wheelchair-connection.com/
Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RD, LDN
Jake Frank

Michelle Canazaro
John Gargiullo





Tuesday, January 28, 2014

January is “Poverty in America Awareness Month”



Today, more than 46 million Americans—and 1 in 6 children (18 percent of all American children) are living below the poverty line. They live in families who have to make difficult choices between food, health care, heat and rent. To bring attention to this national crisis, the Catholic Campaign for Human Development (CCHD) has designated January as “Poverty in America Awareness Month.”

CCHD is committed to working towards the elimination of poverty in the United States. Sponsored by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, a 501(c)(3) non-profit, tax-exempt organization, CCHD today stands as one of the nation’s largest funding organizations for self-help programs for the poor.





Tour Poverty USA



Sesame Street Hunger Special


What Does Hunger Feel Like?


Shopping Matters Tour


Numbers of Hungry Children
Increasing In US

CCHD invests in the dignity of people living below the poverty line. Their programs support self-sufficiency and self-determination for people who are working to bring permanent change to their communities. Their philosophy emphasizes empowerment and participation for those in poverty. By helping the poor to participate in the decisions and actions affecting their lives and communities, CCHD empowers them to move beyond poverty.

Since 1970, CCHD has provided about 8,000 grants to self-help projects to aid those living in poverty. Each year CCHD distributes national grants to more than 300 projects and hundreds of smaller local programs are funded through the 25 percent share of the CCHD collection retained by dioceses.

During Poverty in America Awareness Month, the CCHD devotes efforts to heightening the nation's understanding of the size and depth of the problems of poverty by:
• Releasing public service campaign to raise awareness of poverty in America.
• Encouraging the editorial media to focus on poverty.
• Educating the public to be sensitive to the needs of those in poverty and to treat poor people with respect.
• Holding events in schools and public settings to remind people poverty does exist in American.

USA Poverty Statistics
The official poverty rate in 2009 was 14.3 percent, that is up from 13.2 percent in 2008. The number of people living in extreme poverty (those with incomes below half the poverty line), rose to over 17 million people. This is the highest level on record since data first became available in 1975. Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Housing and Household Economic Statistics Division: 2008

Brother can you Spare a Dime? (1920's)


Different Ways to Get Involved

1. Volunteer
2. Make a donation
3. Share your knowledge
4. Give your support
5. Ask before you give
6. Find out what people need
7. Sponsor an event


Thursday, January 23, 2014

What is Beauty?
Winner of the Healthy Body Image award for 2014
A part of Healthy Weight Week



Healthy Weight Week was created to increase awareness of positive body image, build self-esteem and recognize Beauty cannot be measured by a scale.

The video is a composition created from three sources,
each sharing a message about Beauty.
The first looks at the efforts women have gone through to be "beautiful"
The second is a fashion show raising awareness
 that beauty comes in all sizes. 
The final segment is from the Dove campaign on "Real Beauty".

What is Beauty?



Credits

What is Beautiful?
created by Cherish Manifold

Fashion for Everybody
benefiting Eating Disorders Coalition of Tennessee

Acknowledging the Amazing efforts of Dove
to educate people about "Real Beauty".
"Campaign for Real Beauty"
"Dove Self Esteem Fund"


A part of Healthy Weight Week
Sandra Frank, Ed.D., RD, LDN
http://www.weighing-success.com/

Music
Beautiful People

Monday, December 30, 2013

2013 Eat Right Art Favorites


2013 Favorites from the Eat Right Art Collection


All photographs are available for purchase. Visit the Eat Right Art Collection or contact Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN, LN for custom designs.
The money we raise goes to employ adults with "Special Needs" (Cerebral Palsy, Autism, Down Syndrome, Muscular Dystrophy). Please make a donation or purchase a design.



Prepared by 
Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RD, LDN
Jake Frank
Michelle Canazaro
John Gargiullo

Thursday, December 19, 2013

Book Review: "Younger Next Week" by Elisa Zied, MS, RD, CDN

Elisa Zied, MS, RD, CDN is a remarkable person who motivates people to reach their goals though her books and media presence. Her new book, "Younger Next Week" captures the attention of the 40+ generation. Zied shares her secrets to turning back the clock by emphasizing, "vitality" in the foods we choose, lifestyle behaviors, and fitness.

In “Younger Next Week”, Zied offers surgery-free solutions that defy aging and promote healthy weight loss and emotional well-being with an easy to follow 7-Day Vitality Plan. The book features a Vitality Blueprint consisting of Zied’s signature “Stressipes” for optimal sleep and relation. The blueprint can be easily personalized for nutritional needs, interests, and schedule. 

“Younger Next Week is an empowering anti-aging, food based, vitality promoting book that shows women how to jump-start a lifetime of healthy habits.

Younger Next Week Free Giveaway (ends December 31)


To follow and learn more about Elisa Zied, MS, RD, CDN visit her at 
Website: Elisa Zied




Monday, December 16, 2013

Happy Kwanzaa

"Kwanzaa was created to introduce and reinforce seven basic values of African culture which contribute to building and reinforcing family, community and culture among African American people as well as Africans throughout the world African community. These values are called the Nguzo Saba which in Swahili means the Seven Principles. The Nguzo Saba stand at the heart of the origin and meaning of Kwanzaa, for it is these values which are not only the building blocks for community but also serve to reinforce and enhance them."   - Dr. Maulana Karenga (Founder and Creator)

Kwanzaa is a week-long celebration observed from December 26 to January 1 each year.
 

Edible Art: Seven Basic Principles of Kwanzaa.
The colors of the Kwanzaa flag are black, red and green; black for the people, red for their struggle, and green for the future and hope that comes from their struggle. It is based on the colors given by the Hon. Marcus Garvey as national colors for African people throughout the world.
 

The Kwanzaa art includes the following foods: apples, raspberries, strawberries, black beans, prunes, black berries, black rice, green bell peppers, broccoli, spinach, grapes, and string  beans.

             
Kwanzaa has seven basic symbols. Each represents values and concepts reflective of African culture and contributive to community building and reinforcement. The following are the basic symbols:

Mazao (The Crops) These are symbolic of African harvest celebrations and of the rewards of productive and collective labor. 

Mkeka (The Mat) This is symbolic of our tradition and history and therefore, the foundation on which we build. 

Kinara (The Candle Holder) This is symbolic of our roots, our parent people -- continental Africans.

Muhindi (The Corn) This is symbolic of our children and our future which they embody.

Mishumaa Saba (The Seven Candles) These are symbolic of the Nguzo Saba, the Seven Principles, the matrix and minimum set of values which African people are urged to live by in order to rescue and reconstruct their lives in their own image and according to their own needs.

Kikombe cha Umoja (The Unity Cup) This is symbolic of the foundational principle and practice of unity which makes all else possible.

Zawadi (The Gifts) These are symbolic of the labor and love of parents and the commitments made and kept by the children. 


The following videos share the history and traditions of Kwanzaa. The first video was created by Sesame Street and the story of Kwanzaa is told through a young  boy; the second video is a Happy Kwanzaa song by Teddy Pendergrass; and the third video is a trailer from "The Black Candle", narrated by Maya Angelou.

Sesame Street: Kwanzaa
 

Happy Kwanzaa 
Teddy Pendergrass


Kwanzaa, a Celebration.
"The Black Candle" trailer, 
narrated by Maya Angelou.


Wishing the lights of Kwanzaa
brings happiness, warmth and prosperity.


Resources
The Official Kwanzaa Web Site
The Official Kwanzaa Web Site, to make a donation  

 Wikipedia: Kwanzaa 


When you learn something from people, or from a culture,
you accept it as a gift, and it is your lifelong commitment
to preserve it and build on it. 
- Yo-Yo Ma


2014 Food, Nutrition, and Wellness Events Ebook
An Indispensable Tool for the Food and Health Writer



The “2014 Food, Nutrition, and Wellness Events” ebook is an indispensable tool for the food and/or health writer, blogger, dietitian, and editor. Each month highlights food, nutrition, and wellness events for the month, week, and day. Food photographs or graphic designs are provided to illustrate special events. In December, books by dietitians are featured.

The holidays and events listed come from numerous resources, such as: United States Department of Agriculture, Food and Drug Administration, Presidential Declaration, Federal, State or City Governments, Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Food Associations, American Medical Association, Medical Affiliations, Private Organizations and Companies, Retail Promotions. The events have been verified. However, you should confirm the dates before making plans. Some events may vary from one state to another.

The “Wellness News” calendar employs adults with "Special Needs" (Cerebral Palsy, Autism, Down Syndrome, and Muscular Dystrophy). Part of the monies raised go to employ special need adults.



2014 Food, Nutrition and Wellness Events

Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN
Digital Downloads

The Edible Alphabet

Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN
Digital Download

$4.99


Eat Right Art &
Photographs at Etsy
Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN
Digital Downloads

History of the Wellness Calendar

The wellness calendar has a history spanning over 20 years. When my son Jake was about two years old (back in 1990), he discovered the joys of celebrations and holidays. As most children, he associated these events with family, food, fun, music and gifts.

We had just recently learned Jake has cerebral palsy. Much of his young life had numerous challenges; it was a delight to see him so excited about these events.

Every day he would ask me, “What are we celebrating today?” Initially, I would make up events, such as a new tooth, the sun is out, etc... Eventually I would research reference books and later the Internet to see if there were special functions occurring on a specific day.

To my surprise, I found numerous events each day of the year, but there were too many and it was a bit overwhelming. I started to note those days that dealt only with Health, Nutrition, Food, Safety, Disability Rights and Environmental Issues.

I realized many of these events went unnoticed or unreported by Journalists, Educators and Health Professionals. In 2002, I started to send out about 50 calendars to local and national media representatives in the hope the topics would encourage awareness and inspire ideas for stories and/or projects. Each year the number of calendars we sent out would increase, as did the thank you notes from local, national and worldwide correspondents.

Then in 2006, Jake and his friends graduated high school. They were unable to find employment due to their disabilities. I asked them if they would be interested in working with me on the Wellness Calendar. They said, “Yes”.

The project became a wonderful way to raise money to help them with their ADL, self-esteem, independence.

The calendar was created to make sure every Journalist and Educator knew when certain events occurred, such as National Nutrition Month, World Diabetes Day, Earth Day, RD Day and many others. The goal was to provide a useful tool to impress their editors with some interesting time-sensitive stories.

Later on, the calendar served to provide employment to individuals who were unable to find jobs due to their special abilities.

Remember to Make Every Day Special, Make Every Day Count.

with warm regards,
Dr. Sandra Frank and Jake Frank

Nutrition.gov News

Dietitian Blog List