Wednesday, October 31, 2018

New Food Trends for Halloween and Trick-or-Treat for UNICEF








"For generations, kids have toted UNICEF's collection boxes door to door on Halloween calling out "Trick-or-Treat for UNICEF!" They have raised more than $170 million since 1950 to help children around the world - funds that have enabled UNICEF to save and improve children's lives by providing health care, improved nutrition, clean water, education and more."






Resource
1. UNICEF, Trick-or-Treat for UNICEF

Healthy Halloween Treats





There are healthy Halloween snacks to choose from when going to the market. Read the label - Make sure fruit snacks are made with 100-percent real fruit; choose treats without trans fats, and look for items with whole grain. 

The following items are available in snack-size packages:
1. Whole-grain cheddar flavored crackers
2. Fruit snacks made with 100 percent fruit with added vitamin C
3. Fruit leathers made with 100 percent fruit
4. Animal-shaped graham crackers made without trans fat
5. Raisins
6. Individual fruit cups
7. Low-fat pudding cups
8. Baked, unsalted pretzels
9. Popcorn



Resources
1. EatRight, Enjoy a Healthy and Happy Halloween
2. EatRight, 7 Ways to Make Halloween Safer for Kids with Food Allergies, Rima Kleiner, MS, RD, LDN 




Tuesday, October 30, 2018

Teal Pumpkin Project and Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE)

About the Teal Pumpkin Project®

Every child should be able to experience the joy and tradition of trick-or-treating on Halloween. But kids with food allergies are often left out of the fun, since most candy is off limits. Beware of small items a child can choke on.


Food Allergy Research & Education's (FARE) Teal Pumpkin Project helps make sure all children will come home on Halloween night with something they can enjoy. It just takes one simple act: offering non-food treats, such as glow sticks or small toys, as an alternative to candy.




Get Involved
1. Provide non-food treats for trick-or-treaters.
2. Place a teal pumpkin in front of your home to indicate to passersby that you have non-food treats available.
3. Display a free printable sign from FARE to explain the meaning of your teal pumpkin.


Resources
Website: Teal Pumpkin Project
Facebook: FARE’s Teal Pumpkin Project
Twitter: FARE



Haunted Refrigerator Night - Food Safety




Resource and Reference
1. Partnership for Food Safety Education, BAC. 
2. FoodSafety.gov


Monday, October 29, 2018

World Stroke Day - Nutrition Tips for Prevention and Rehabilitation




Stroke happens when the blood supply to part of the brain is cut off. Without blood, brain cells can be damaged or die. Depending on which part of the brain is affected and how quickly the person is treated, the effects of stroke on survivors can be devastating to a person’s body, mobility and speech, as well as how they think and feel.

Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability globally. It can happen to anyone at any age, and impacts everyone: survivors, family and friends, workplaces and communities. From making individual changes, to advocating globally and locally for policies that will deliver healthier communities, we can all do something to prevent stroke.


This year the focus of the World Stroke Campaign is Prevention. On the 29th October 2017, World Stroke Day, we are calling on our members, partners and stroke stakeholders to do what they can to improve community and individual awareness of stroke risk and take action to prevent stroke at individual and population level.




Stroke Warning Signs

If you notice one or more of these signs, don't wait. Stroke is a medical emergency.
Call your emergency medical services and get to a hospital right away!

Learn the warning signs of stroke

  • Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg, especially on one side of the body
  • Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding
  • Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes
  • Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination
  • Sudden, severe headache with no known cause

Take action in an emergency

  • Not all the warning signs occur in every stroke. Don't ignore signs of stroke, even if they go away!
  • Check the time. When did the first warning sign or symptom start? You'll be asked this important question later.
  • If you have one or more stroke symptoms that last more than a few minutes, don't delay! Seek immediate medical attention!
  • If you're with someone who may be having stroke symptoms, immediately call one of the emergency rescue service numbers. Expect the person to protest — denial is common. Don't take "no" for an answer. Insist on taking prompt action.

The FAST test

Facial weakness, arm weakness and speech difficulties are common signs of stroke. You can use the FAST test to remember the signs of stroke
The FAST test involves asking three simple questions:
  • Face – Can the person smile, has their mouth drooped?
  • Arms – Can the person raise both arms?
  • Speech – Can the person speak clearly and understand what you say?
  • Time – Act FAST!
If you answer yes to any of these questions, act FAST and call for medical emergency help immediately.
Stroke is always a medical emergency. Remembering the signs of stroke and acting FAST could mean saving a life.

What causes stroke

  • High blood pressure (Hypertension is the most common and treatable risk factor in stroke)
  • Smoking
  • High cholesterol
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Obesity
  • Sedentary life style
  • Atrial fibrillation

Stroke warning signs

  • Heart disease
  • Carotid artery disease
  • Alcohol

It is possible to prevent stroke

  • Good control of blood pressure
  • Good control of diabetes
  • Lower cholesterol
  • Regular exercise
  • Quit smoking
  • Lose weight
  • Never ignore a small stroke
Nutrition Tips for Stroke Survivors
Healthy food habits can help reduce risk factors for stroke — poor cholesterol levels, high blood pressure and excess weight. Diets high in saturated fat and trans fat can raise blood cholesterol levels. Diets high in sodium can contribute to increased blood pressure, and high-calorie diets can contribute to obesity. A diet with five or more servings of fruits and vegetables per day may reduce the risk of stroke.
The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association offers these recommendations for a healthy diet:
1. Eat a diet rich in vegetables and fruits.
2. Choose whole-grain, high-fiber foods.
3. Eat fish at least twice a week.
4. Limit saturated fat and trans fat. Avoiding partially hydrogenated oils will reduce trans fats.
5. Choose lean meats and poultry, and prepare them without using saturated or trans fats.
6. Select low-fat dairy products.
7. Cut back on drinks and foods with added sugars. The AHA recommends that no more than half of your discretionary calories should come from added sugars. For most American women, the discretionary calorie allowance is no more than 100 calories and no more than 150 calories for men.
8. Choose and prepare foods with little salt (sodium). The AHA recommends consuming less than 1500 mg of sodium a day.
9. If you drink alcohol, do so in moderation. Limit yourself to one drink per day if you’re a non-pregnant woman or two drinks if you’re a man.

To Get the Nutrition You Need
Some stroke survivors have a loss of appetite. For others, eating may be difficult due to swallowing problems or limited hand or arm movement. In any case, talk to your healthcare team to make sure you’re getting the nutrition you need. To make eating a little easier again, try these steps:
  • Choose healthy foods with stronger flavors, such as broiled fish and citrus fruits. Also, spices add flavor to food and serve as a good substitute for salt.
  • Choose colorful, visually appealing foods, such as salmon, carrots and dark green vegetables.
  • Cut foods into small pieces to make them easier to chew.
  • Pick softer, easier-to-chew foods, such as yogurt, bananas, whole-grain hot cereals, and low sodium soups.
  • If you have trouble swallowing, talk to your speech therapist or doctor. This condition can be treated.
  • If weakness in arms or hands is a problem, you might try adaptive eating utensils. Some types of flatware have thicker handles that are easier to hold, and “rocker knives” make it possible to cut food using one hand.

Making Mealtime Easier

When stroke survivors have lost their appetites, caregivers can help by:
  • Sharing meals with the survivor at regular times during the day.
  • Setting a leisurely pace for the meal.
  • Serving foods that the survivor wants.
  • Encouraging healthy snacks or small meals throughout the day.
  • Reducing distractions during meals.
  • Watching for any problems the survivor may have with chewing or swallowing.

Resources
1. World Stroke Day
2. American Heart Association, Work Stroke Day
3. Harvard Heart Letter, DASH diet may lower stroke risk







National Oatmeal Day - Health Benefits

Oatmeal is ground oat groats or porridge made from oats. Oatmeal can also be ground oats, steel-cut oats, crushed oats, or rolled oats.

Nutrition Profile - National Oatmeal and Cat Day


Health Benefits
Consumption of oatmeal is known to help lower blood cholesterol because of its soluble fiber content. The popularity of oatmeal and oat products increased after January 1997 when the Food and Drug Administration allowed labels to claim it may reduce the risk of heart disease when combined with a low-fat diet.


Nutrition Information
Ingredients
3/4 cup Oatmeal, cooked
1/3 cup Raspberries

Steel Cut Oatmeal: Healthy Snack Ideas
St. Louis Children's Hospital




Resources and References
1. Wikipedia: Oatmeal
2. WebMD: 
Heartier Benefits Seen From Oatmeal

Nutritional Analysis Services

Ensure accurate and cost effective nutritional analysis and food nutrition facts labels for your recipes and menus utilizing an extensive research database. A great service for the Media, Cookbook Publishers, Writers, Chefs, Recipe Websites and Blogs. Your readers will enjoy and benefit from the Nutrition information.

For more information, visit Dietitians-Online Nutritional Analysis Services

contact:
Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN, LN, FAND
recipenews@gmail.com
954-796-7235



Sunday, October 28, 2018

Wild Food Day
October 28

For thousands of years people have been eating foods grown in the wild; such as wild greens, mushrooms, roots, fruits, berries, vegetables, and flowers.

AZ of Bushcraft (E for Edible wild food)
How to identify and eat wild plants and how to cook Fish over an open fire.

Today, the gathering of wild foods have become increasingly popular.  People  consider wild foods healthier and eco-friendly.

Resources:

1. The Forager's Wild Food Basics
2. Wild Food Adventures
3. 
Edible Wild Food
4. 
How to Find Wild Edible Plants


The Forager's Credo
When in doubt, throw it out!
...the six smartest words to remember
when learning about collecting and eating wild plants and mushrooms.

Saturday, October 27, 2018

October, National Down Syndrome Awareness Month
Joan E. Guthrie Medlen, RD and Down Syndrome Nutrition

Every October, the National Down Syndrome Society (NDSS) reminds the world in a big way about the gifts that people with Down syndrome bring to their communities through a special video presentation on a jumbo screen in the heart of the Times Square.
 
The Times Square Video presentation kicked off Down Syndrome Awareness Month on the morning of the New York City Buddy Walk. This year, our third-party volunteers chose over 200 photos from over 1,000 submissions for the Times Square Video. The featured photographs highlight children, teens and adults with Down syndrome working, playing and learning alongside friends and family. These collective images promote acceptance and inclusion, which is the foundation of NDSS and the National Buddy Walk Program.





Joan Guthrie Medlen, M.Ed, RD and
the Down Syndrome Nutrition Handbook

Joan E. Guthrie Medlen, a mother of a child with Down syndrome, a registered dietitian, and the author of “The Down Syndrome Nutrition Handbook: A Guide to Promoting Healthy Lifestyles,” encourages parents to start teaching healthy habits early but stresses that it's never too late to start, no matter what age.

Joan became involved in issues related to people with Down syndrome after the birth of her son. “As we all know, parents of kids with disabilities are involved in the big picture immediately – like it or not! I chose to work in the field of nutrition/health promotion for people with Down syndrome over 16 years ago. It’s a choice I've not regretted.”


Introducing Cooking By Color:
Recipes for Independence by 
Joan E. Guthrie Medlen, RD





Meet a family who shares their
amazing story of love and living
.



About Buddy Walk
The Buddy Walk® was established in 1995 by the National Down Syndrome Society to celebrate Down Syndrome Awareness Month in October and to promote acceptance and inclusion of people with Down syndrome. Today, the Buddy Walk program is supported nationally by NDSS and organized at the local level by parent support groups, schools and other organizations and individuals.


Friday, October 26, 2018

Celebrate National Farm to School Month


The National Farm to School Network advocated for the creation of National Farm to School Month and now organizes the annual celebration in October. National Farm to School Month was designated by Congress in 2010 to demonstrate the growing importance of farm to school programs as a means to improve child nutrition, support local economies and educate children about the origins of food.

The National Farm to School Network has also developed resources and activities to promote Farm to School Month in schools, communities and media outlets. All of these tools are available on farmtoschool.org.
      


Here are some ways you can help us get the word out about Farm to School Month:
   • #F2SMonth - Use this hashtag in your social
Media Messages
   •@FarmtoSchool - follow on Twitter
   • Follow on Facebook

Learn more about the movement throughout October. They will be sharing stories and information on their blog about how farm to school is empowering children and their families to make informed food choices and contributing to their communities. 

The resource database is home to even more information and includes searchable tags for Farm to School Month as well as topics like farm to preschool, school gardens and procurement.

Celebrate National Farm to School Month

Many farm to school programs begin with a small activity generating interest and engages the whole community.

Organizations and Businesses
   • Become an official Farm to School Month partner! Partners commit to using their communications channels to spread the word about Farm to School Month. Suggested messaging and weekly updates will be provided by NFSN. Contact: info@farmtoschool.org
   • Show your support for Farm to School Month by becoming an official sponsor! Contact: info@farmtoschool.org

Teachers
   • Plan nutrition education activities, such as Harvest of the Month, featuring a local food product that is in season.
   • Connect instructional school gardens and garden based learning activities to the curriculum.
   • Organize farm tours or trips to the local farmers’ market.
   • Send information about Farm to School Month to parents.

School food service professionals
   • Promote Farm to School Month on the school menu and in the cafeteria. Find logos, posters and more at farmtoschool.org
   • Do a taste test of local products or feature one item for lunch, breakfast or snacks.
   • Create a farm to school salad bar using local products.

Farmers
   • Connect with your local school and offer to conduct a classroom session during October or offer to host a visit to your farm.
   • Promote Farm to School Month on your farm or at your farmers’ market booth with posters and other materials, which can be downloaded or ordered from farmtoschool.org.

Families
   • Visit your local farmers’ market. Buy something you’ve never tried before, cook it and share with your family and friends.
   • Cook with seasonal products as much as possible. Find out what products are grown in your region and when. Most State Departments of Agriculture or Buy Fresh Buy Local chapters can provide you with a regional crop calendar.
   • Volunteer at your local school to support a school garden or classroom educational activity.

Resource:
To learn more, visit the National Farm to School website.

National Pumpkin Day - Recipes and Nutrition Profile

Pumpkins are thought to have originated in North America. The oldest evidence, pumpkin-related seeds dating between 7000 and 5500 BC, was found in Mexico.

The color of pumpkins derives from orange carotenoid pigments, including beta-cryptoxanthin, alpha and beta-carotene, all of which are provitamin A compounds converted to vitamin A in the body. 

Pumpkins
Is anything more fall-like than a pumpkin? These orange winter squashes are chock-full of vitamin A and deliver 3 grams of fiber per ½-cup serving of cooked sugar pumpkin, plus potassium. Note that the pumpkins you carve into jack-o’-lanterns are not the same type of pumpkins you eat. Try pumpkin puree mixed into mac-and-cheese or with hummus for a seasonal spread. Looking for more options? Add pumpkin to pancake batter, oatmeal, smoothies or your kid's favorite chili.





Nutritional Profile
And don't forget about roasting the seeds! Pumpkin seeds are a delicious and healthful snack and a good source of several nutrients, including zinc, which is essential for many body processes including immune function.
To toast your pumpkin seeds, first, rinse to remove pulp and strings. Spread seeds on a baking sheet that has been coated with cooking spray or drizzle a small amount of olive oil over seeds. Bake at 325°F for about 30 minutes or until lightly toasted. Stir occasionally during cooking. Take a look at your spice rack and try a seasoning on your toasted seeds such as garlic powder or Cajun seasoning.
How a Pumpkin Grows

Vegetable Soup served in a Pumpkin Bowl




National Pumpkin Day from the Frank Family


Thursday, October 25, 2018

World Pasta Day



Pasta is a type of noodle and commonly referred to a variety of pasta dishes. It is a staple food of traditional Italian cuisine. Usually, pasta is made from unleavened dough of durum wheat flour mixed with water and formed into sheets or various shapes, then cooked and served in any number of dishes. It can be made with flour from other cereals or grains, and eggs may be used instead of water. Kinds of pasta are divided into two broad categories, dried (pasta secca) and fresh (pasta fresca). 

Both dried and fresh pasta come in a number of shapes and varieties. Common forms of pasta include long shapes, short shapes, tubes, flat shapes, and sheets, filled or stuffed, and decorative shapes.

How Pasta is Made

Making Pasta with Children


Shapes





Recipe: Artichoke and Lemon Pasta
Taste of Home




Resources and References
1. Wikipedia: Pasta   This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License
2. Cooking Light: Pasta Recipes








Wednesday, October 24, 2018

October 24, Food Day - From Our Garden to Our Table

Welcome to our food day celebration!
From Our Garden



Food Day inspires Americans to change their diets and our food policies. Every October 24, thousands of events all around the country bring Americans together to celebrate and enjoy real food and to push for improved food policies. 

6 FOOD DAY PRINCIPLES

1. Reduce diet-related disease by promoting safe, healthy foods.
2. Support sustainable farms and limit subsidies to big agribusiness.
3. Expand access to food and alleviate hunger.
4. Protect the environment and animals by reforming factory farms.
5. Promote health by curbing junk-food marketing to kids.
6. Support fair conditions for food and farm workers.




Planning Our Food Day Meal
Every family is unique. When planning our meal we considered foods from our garden, finances, physical abilities, including finger foods and easy to chew and swallow; and color – the theme for our dinner. 

Our family and friends come from diverse backgrounds with physical and emotional challenges or chronic illnesses, such as Cerebral Palsy, Autism, and Heart Disease.



Our Meal
The main course is a tri-color pasta with a variety of toppings to choose from.  Our garden provided us with tomatoes, onions, broccoli, cucumbers, and basil. We purchased spinach, pasta sauce, locally grown fruits, part-skim mozzarella and for the meat eaters, we had ground turkey meatballs and shredded chicken.

In addition, we prepared a red, white and green grilled cheese sandwich from the US Dept of Health and Human Services cookbook 
Keep the Beat Recipes, recipes. A free copy of the cookbook is available on their website. 

The dessert was a big hit. We made fruit kabobs using locally grown fruits and paired with low-fat ice cream and for Jake, we prepared a smoothie using the same ingredients.



Adaptations and Individual Preferences


My son Jake was born with Cerebral Palsy and is a quadriplegia. He is unable to hold utensils and requires a straw to drink fluids. Finger foods and a weighted cup with a flexi straw usually provide him the most independence.






National Bologna Day

Aside from pork, bologna can alternatively be made out of chickenturkeybeefvenison, a combination, or soy protein. Typical seasoning for bologna includes black peppernutmegallspicecelery seedcoriander, and like mortadella, myrtle berries give it its distinctive flavor, U.S. Government regulations require American bologna to be finely ground and without visible pieces of fat.



Resources
Bologna sausage, Wikipedia   
Sausages and Food Safety, USDA  

Tuesday, October 23, 2018

October, National Apple Month: Health Benefits and Recipes



Health Benefits
Apple is a fruit rich in antioxidants and a good source of fiber. Quercetin is an antioxidant found in apples and may inhibit lung cancer. Pectin found in apples help treat diarrhea and constipation by adding bulk to the stool. Other benefits being studied include treatments for diabetes, heart disease, lowering blood pressure, lowering blood levels of LDL, reducing risks of Alzheimer’s, and decreasing bone fractures.

Apple seeds should never be eaten. They contain the poison cyanide.

Let’s not forget the peel. The apple peel contains ursolic acid, a chemical that may prevent muscle wasting.


There may be some truth to “An Apple a Day, Keeps the Doctor Away”.


Recipe

Baked Sliced Apples


Yield: 2 servings

Ingredients
2 Apples, cored and sliced
1 Tbsp Lemon juice
1/4 teaspoon Vanilla
1/2 cup Lemon-Lime Soda, diet
1/4 teaspoon Cinnamon, ground
1/2 cup Bran Flakes
1/2 cup Applesauce, unsweetened

Directions
1. Preheat oven to 375°F. In a mixing bowl, combine apples, lemon juice, vanilla, and lemon-lime soda. Toss to combine.

2 Layer sliced apples in a baking pan.
3 Combine cinnamon, bran flakes, and applesauce. Place mixture over apples.
4 Bake 45 minutes or until apples are tender.
5. Serve with low fat vanilla yogurt or ice cream.





Apples - Health Benefits with Allison Parker, MS, RD



References and Resources
1. U.S. Apple Association
2. WebMD: Apple
3. U.S. Apple Association: Recipes






Nutritional Analysis Services
Ensure accurate and cost effective nutritional analysis and food nutrition facts labels for your recipes and menus utilizing an extensive research database. A great service for the Media, Cookbook Publishers, Writers, Chefs, Recipe Websites and Blogs. Your readers will enjoy and benefit from the Nutrition information.

For more information, visit Dietitians-Online Nutritional Analysis Services

contact:
Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN, LN, FAND
recipenews@gmail.com
954-796-7235




Nutrition.gov News

Dietitian Blog List