Monday, October 31, 2016

October, National Apple Month: Health Benefits and Recipes



Health Benefits
Apple is a fruit rich in antioxidants and a good source of fiber. Quercetin is an antioxidant found in apples and may inhibit lung cancer. Pectin found in apples help treat diarrhea and constipation by adding bulk to the stool. Other benefits being studied include treatments for diabetes, heart disease, lowering blood pressure, lowering blood levels of LDL, reducing risks of Alzheimer’s, and decreasing bone fractures.

Apple seeds should never be eaten. They contain the poison cyanide.

Let’s not forget the peel. The apple peel contains ursolic acid, a chemical that may prevent muscle wasting.


There may be some truth to “An Apple a Day, Keeps the Doctor Away”.


Recipe

Baked Sliced Apples


Yield: 2 servings

Ingredients
2 Apples, cored and sliced
1 Tbsp Lemon juice
1/4 teaspoon Vanilla
1/2 cup Lemon-Lime Soda, diet
1/4 teaspoon Cinnamon, ground
1/2 cup Bran Flakes
1/2 cup Applesauce, unsweetened

Directions
1. Preheat oven to 375°F. In a mixing bowl, combine apples, lemon juice, vanilla, and lemon-lime soda. Toss to combine.

2 Layer sliced apples in a baking pan.
3 Combine cinnamon, bran flakes, and applesauce. Place mixture over apples.
4 Bake 45 minutes or until apples are tender.
5. Serve with low fat vanilla yogurt or ice cream.





Apples - Health Benefits with Allison Parker, MS, RD



References and Resources
1. U.S. Apple Association
2. WebMD: Apple
3. U.S. Apple Association: Recipes






Nutritional Analysis Services
Ensure accurate and cost effective nutritional analysis and food nutrition facts labels for your recipes and menus utilizing an extensive research database. A great service for the Media, Cookbook Publishers, Writers, Chefs, Recipe Websites and Blogs. Your readers will enjoy and benefit from the Nutrition information.

For more information, visit Dietitians-Online Nutritional Analysis Services

contact:
Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN, LN, FAND
recipenews@gmail.com
954-796-7235




October, National Down Syndrome Awareness Month
Joan E. Guthrie Medlen, RD and Down Syndrome Nutrition

Every October, the National Down Syndrome Society (NDSS) reminds the world in a big way about the gifts that people with Down syndrome bring to their communities through a special video presentation on a jumbo screen in the heart of the Times Square.
 
The Times Square Video presentation kicked off Down Syndrome Awareness Month on the morning of the New York City Buddy Walk. This year, our third-party volunteers chose over 200 photos from over 1,000 submissions for the Times Square Video. The featured photographs highlight children, teens and adults with Down syndrome working, playing and learning alongside friends and family. These collective images promote acceptance and inclusion, which is the foundation of NDSS and the National Buddy Walk Program.





Joan Guthrie Medlen, M.Ed, RD and
the Down Syndrome Nutrition Handbook

Joan E. Guthrie Medlen, a mother of a child with Down syndrome, a registered dietitian, and the author of “The Down Syndrome Nutrition Handbook: A Guide to Promoting Healthy Lifestyles,” encourages parents to start teaching healthy habits early but stresses that it's never too late to start, no matter what age.

Joan became involved in issues related to people with Down syndrome after the birth of her son. “As we all know, parents of kids with disabilities are involved in the big picture immediately – like it or not! I chose to work in the field of nutrition/health promotion for people with Down syndrome over 16 years ago. It’s a choice I've not regretted.”


Introducing Cooking By Color:
Recipes for Independence by 
Joan E. Guthrie Medlen, RD





Meet a family who shares their
amazing story of love and living
.



About Buddy Walk
The Buddy Walk® was established in 1995 by the National Down Syndrome Society to celebrate Down Syndrome Awareness Month in October and to promote acceptance and inclusion of people with Down syndrome. Today, the Buddy Walk program is supported nationally by NDSS and organized at the local level by parent support groups, schools and other organizations and individuals.



Healthy Halloween Treats





There are healthy Halloween snacks to choose from when going to the market. Read the label - Make sure fruit snacks are made with 100-percent real fruit; choose treats without trans fats; and look for items with whole grain. 

The following items are available in snack-size packages:
1. Whole-grain cheddar flavored crackers
2. Fruit snacks made with 100 percent fruit with added vitamin C
3. Fruit leathers made with 100 percent fruit
4. Animal-shaped graham crackers made without trans fat
5. Raisins
6. Individual fruit cups
7. Low-fat pudding cups
8. Baked, unsalted pretzels
9. Popcorn







Resources
1. Kids Eat Right. Enjoy a Healthy and Happy Halloween 
2. Kids Eat Right. Have a Healthy Halloween Party 





National Pretzel Month: Nutrition and Recipe


Pretzel Dips

Nutrition Information

Pretzel Recipe: Pizza Pretzel with
Pasta Sauce


A Brief History Of The Pretzel,
presented by Synder's of Hanover


Today, the popular advertisement words
are Sustainability or Renewable.


October 30, Haunted Refrigerator Night




Resource and Reference
1. Partnership for Food Safety Education, BAC. 
2. FoodSafety.gov


Happy Halloween: New Food Trends and Trick-or-Treat for UNICEF






"For generations, kids have toted UNICEF's collection boxes door to door on Halloween calling out "Trick-or-Treat for UNICEF!" They have raised more than $170 million since 1950 to help children around the world - funds that have enabled UNICEF to save and improve children's lives by providing health care, improved nutrition, clean water, education and more."






Resource
1. UNICEF, Trick-or-Treat for UNICEF

Sunday, October 30, 2016

Teal Pumpkin Project and Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE)

About the Teal Pumpkin Project®

Every child should be able to experience the joy and tradition of trick-or-treating on Halloween. But kids with food allergies are often left out of the fun, since most candy is off limits.


Food Allergy Research & Education's (FARE) Teal Pumpkin Project helps make sure all children will come home on Halloween night with something they can enjoy. It just takes one simple act: offering non-food treats, such as glow sticks or small toys, as an alternative to candy.




Get Involved
1. Provide non-food treats for trick-or-treaters.
2. Place a teal pumpkin in front of your home to indicate to passersby that you have non-food treats available.
3. Display a free printable sign or premium poster from FARE to explain the meaning of your teal pumpkin.

4. Make a donation to support the Teal Pumpkin Project and receive a free gift.

Resources
Website: Teal Pumpkin Project
Facebook: FARE’s Teal Pumpkin Project
Twitter: FARE



Saturday, October 29, 2016

October 29, National Oatmeal Day - Health Benefits

Oatmeal is ground oat groats or porridge made from oats. Oatmeal can also be ground oats, steel-cut oats, crushed oats, or rolled oats.

Health Benefits
Consumption of oatmeal is known to help lower blood cholesterol because of its soluble fiber content. The popularity of oatmeal and oat products increased after January 1997 when the Food and Drug Administration allowed labels to claim it may reduce the risk of heart disease when combined with a low-fat diet.


Nutrition Information
Ingredients
3/4 cup Oatmeal, cooked
1/3 cup Raspberries

Steel Cut Oatmeal: Healthy Snack Ideas
St. Louis Children's Hospital




Resources and References
1. Wikipedia: Oatmeal
2. WebMD: 
Heartier Benefits Seen From Oatmeal





Nutritional Analysis Services

Ensure accurate and cost effective nutritional analysis and food nutrition facts labels for your recipes and menus utilizing an extensive research database. A great service for the Media, Cookbook Publishers, Writers, Chefs, Recipe Websites and Blogs. Your readers will enjoy and benefit from the Nutrition information.

For more information, visit Dietitians-Online Nutritional Analysis Services

contact:
Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN, LN
recipenews@gmail.com
954-796-7235



Friday, October 28, 2016

Wild Food Day
October 28

For thousands of years people have been eating foods grown in the wild; such as wild greens, mushrooms, roots, fruits, berries, vegetables, and flowers.

AZ of Bushcraft (E for Edible wild food)
How to identify and eat wild plants and how to cook Fish over an open fire.

Today, the gathering of wild foods have become increasingly popular.  People  consider wild foods healthier and eco-friendly.

Resources:

1. The Forager's Wild Food Basics
2. Wild Food Adventures
3. 
Edible Wild Food
4. 
How to Find Wild Edible Plants


The Forager's Credo
When in doubt, throw it out!
...the six smartest words to remember
when learning about collecting and eating wild plants and mushrooms.

Thursday, October 27, 2016

Celebrate National Farm to School Month


The National Farm to School Network advocated for the creation of National Farm to School Month and now organizes the annual celebration in October. National Farm to School Month was designated by Congress in 2010 to demonstrate the growing importance of farm to school programs as a means to improve child nutrition, support local economies and educate children about the origins of food.

The National Farm to School Network has also developed resources and activities to promote Farm to School Month in schools, communities and media outlets. All of these tools are available on farmtoschool.org.
      


Here are some ways you can help us get the word out about Farm to School Month:
   • #F2SMonth - Use this hashtag in your social
Media Messages
   •@FarmtoSchool - follow on Twitter
   • Follow on Facebook

Learn more about the movement throughout October. They will be sharing stories and information on their blog about how farm to school is empowering children and their families to make informed food choices and contributing to their communities. 

The resource database is home to even more information and includes searchable tags for Farm to School Month as well as topics like farm to preschool, school gardens and procurement.

Celebrate National Farm to School Month

Many farm to school programs begin with a small activity generating interest and engages the whole community.

Organizations and Businesses
   • Become an official Farm to School Month partner! Partners commit to using their communications channels to spread the word about Farm to School Month. Suggested messaging and weekly updates will be provided by NFSN. Contact: info@farmtoschool.org
   • Show your support for Farm to School Month by becoming an official sponsor! Contact: info@farmtoschool.org

Teachers
   • Plan nutrition education activities, such as Harvest of the Month, featuring a local food product that is in season.
   • Connect instructional school gardens and garden based learning activities to the curriculum.
   • Organize farm tours or trips to the local farmers’ market.
   • Send information about Farm to School Month to parents.

School food service professionals
   • Promote Farm to School Month on the school menu and in the cafeteria. Find logos, posters and more at farmtoschool.org
   • Do a taste test of local products or feature one item for lunch, breakfast or snacks.
   • Create a farm to school salad bar using local products.

Farmers
   • Connect with your local school and offer to conduct a classroom session during October or offer to host a visit to your farm.
   • Promote Farm to School Month on your farm or at your farmers’ market booth with posters and other materials, which can be downloaded or ordered from farmtoschool.org.

Families
   • Visit your local farmers’ market. Buy something you’ve never tried before, cook it and share with your family and friends.
   • Cook with seasonal products as much as possible. Find out what products are grown in your region and when. Most State Departments of Agriculture or Buy Fresh Buy Local chapters can provide you with a regional crop calendar.
   • Volunteer at your local school to support a school garden or classroom educational activity.

Resource:
To learn more, visit the National Farm to School website.

Monday, October 24, 2016

October 24, Food Day - From Our Garden to Our Table

Welcome to our food day celebration!

Food Day inspires Americans to change their diets and our food policies. Every October 24, thousands of events all around the country bring Americans together to celebrate and enjoy real food and to push for improved food policies.  The 2016 Food Day theme is "Toward a Greener Diet."


1. Reduce diet-related disease by promoting safe, healthy foods.
2. Support sustainable farms and limit subsidies to big agribusiness.
3. Expand access to food and alleviate hunger.
4. Protect the environment and animals by reforming factory farms.
5. Promote health by curbing junk-food marketing to kids.
6. Support fair conditions for food and farm workers.




Planning Our Food Day Meal
Every family is unique. When planning our meal we considered foods from our garden, finances, physical abilities, including finger foods and easy to chew and swallow; and color – the theme for our dinner. 

Our family and friends come from diverse backgrounds with physical and emotional challenges or chronic illnesses, such as Cerebral Palsy, Autism, and Heart Disease.



Our Meal
The main course is a tri-color pasta with a variety of toppings to choose from.  Our garden provided us with tomatoes, onions, broccoli, cucumbers, and basil. We purchased spinach, pasta sauce, locally grown fruits, part-skim mozzarella and for the meat eaters we had ground turkey meatballs and shredded chicken.

In addition, we prepared a red, white and green grilled cheese sandwich from the US Dept of Health and Human Services cookbook
Keep the Beat Recipes, recipes. A free copy of the cookbook is available on their website. 

The dessert was a big hit. We made fruit kabobs using locally grown fruits  and paired with low fat ice cream and for Jake we prepared a smoothie using the same ingredients.


From Our Garden

Adaptations and Individual Preferences


My son Jake was born with Cerebral Palsy and is a quadriplegia. He is unable to hold utensils and requires a straw to drink fluids. Finger foods and a weighted cup with a flexi straw usually provide him the most independence.




Resources and References
Food Day
Facebook Food Day
Twitter Food Day
Pinterest Food Day

Saturday, October 22, 2016

Eat Right with Colors


Music: The Wonderful World of Color, Walt Disney and Disney World.

Eat right with colors explores the health benefits associated with eating foods of many colors. Including color diversity in your meals and food choices enhances your intake of a wide range of nutrients. 

Red and Pink Foods
Apples, Beets, Cayenne, Cherries, Cranberries, Guava, Kidney Beans, Papaya, Pink Beans, Pink/Red Grapefruit, Pomegranates, Radicchio, Radishes, Raspberries, Red Bell Peppers, Red Cabbages, Red Chili Peppers, Red Corn, Red Currants, Red Grapes, Red Onions, Red Pears, Red Peppers, Red Plums, Red Potatoes, Red Tomatoes, Rhubarb, Strawberries, Tomatoes, Watermelons

Green Foods
Alfalfa, Artichokes, Arugula, Asparagus, Avocado, Bok Choy, Broccoli, Broccoli rabe, Brussels Sprouts, Celery, Chives, Collard Greens, Cucumbers, Dandelion Greens, Edamame, Endive, Fennel, Green apples, Green Beans, Green cabbage, Green Grapes, Green Olives, Green Onion, Green Pears, Green Peas, Green Pepper, Green Tomatoes, Honeydew, Kale, Kiwi, Leeks, Lettuce, Limes, Mint, Okra, Oregano, Parsley, Pistachios, Snow Peas, Spinach, Sugar snap peas, Swiss Chard, Tarragon, Tomatillo, Wasabi, Watercress, Zucchini

Blue and Purple Foods
Blue Grapes, Blue and Purple Potatoes, Blueberries, Dried Plums, Plums, Eggplant, Pomegranates, Elderberries, Juniper Berries, Kelp (Seaweed), Purple Belgian Endive, Purple Cabbage, Purple Figs

Yellow and Orange Foods
Apricots, Bananas, Butternut Squash, Cantaloupe, Carrots, Cheddar Cheese, Citrus Fruits, Clementines, Corn, Creamsicle, Garbanzo Beans, Golden Apples, Golden Flax Seed, Golden Raisins, Grapefruit, Honey, Lemon, Lemongrass, Mandarin Oranges, Mangoes, Nectarines, Orange Jello, Orange Peppers, Orange Tomatoes, Oranges, Papaya, Parsnips, Peaches, Pears, Persimmons, Pineapple, Pumpkin, Rutabagas, Saffron, Salmon, Spaghetti Squash, Squash Blossoms, Sweet Corn, Sweet Potatoes, Tangerines, Whole Grains, Yams, Yellow Apples, Yellow Beans, Yellow Peppers, Yellow Summer Squash, Yellow Wax Beans

White and Black Foods
White: Cauliflower, Coconut, Garlic, Ginger, Green Onions, Scallions, Horseradish, Jicama, Kohlrabi, Leeks, Millet, Mushrooms, Onions, Parsnips, Quinoa, Shallots, Soy Products, Sunflower Seeds, Tofu, Turnips, White Beans, White Corn, White Sesame Seeds

Black: Black Beans, Black Cherries, Black Currants, Black Mushrooms, Black Olives, Black Quinoa, Black Raspberry, Black Rice, Black Sesame Seeds, Black Soybeans, Blackberries, Boysenberries, Prunes, Raisins, Seaweeds, Tamari (Soy Sauce)



Wellness News employs adults with "Special Needs" (Cerebral Palsy, Autism, Down Syndrome, Muscular Dystrophy). Many of the photographs are available for purchase with the proceeds going to special need adults. Contact Dr. Sandra Frank for additional information (recipenews@gmail.com). 

Please make a donation
 
Prepared by
http://www.dietitians-online.com/
http://www.weighing-success.com/
Wellness News (www.weighing-success.com/WellnessNews.html)
Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RD, LDN
Jake Frank

Michelle Canazaro
John Gargiullo



October 22, National Nut Day





Nuts once considered a high fat, high calorie food is now being recognized as a Nutritious Snack with essential fatty acids, omega fats, protein and many vitamins and minerals.





Answers Below

Health Benefits of Nuts

How Nuts are Prepared


Recipes and Marketing Nuts
Planters Commercial


Oregon Hazelnut



Sharon Palmer, RD - Steel Cut Oats
Risotto with Walnuts


Resources and Answers
1. Peanuts
2. Cashews 
3. Walnuts 
6. Pecans
7. Macadamia
8. Almonds 



Friday, October 21, 2016

October 21, National Mammography Day - Remind a friend to have a Mammogram

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. October 21, National Mammography Day.
Remind a friend to have a Mammogram. Pass it Along.


Information obtained from the
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


A mammogram is an x-ray of the breast used to look for early signs of breast cancer. Regular mammograms are the best tests doctors have to find breast cancer early. When breast cancer is found early, many women go on to live long and healthy lives.

Women should have mammograms every two years from age 50 to 74 years; and more often if breast cancer runs in the family or you have any symptoms or changes in your breast.

To find out where you can get a mammogram, the CDC has provided the following resources.

1. If you have a regular doctor, talk to him or her. 
2. Call the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Information Service (CIS) at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237). For TTY: 1-800-332-8615. 
3. For Medicare information, you can call 1-800 MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227) or visit The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. 
4. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has a program called the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program,which works with health departments and other groups to provide low-cost or free mammograms to women who qualify. Find out if you qualify.



Thursday, October 20, 2016

October 20 World Osteoporosis Day
Love Your Bones: Protect Your Future




The National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF) is the leading consumer and community-focused health organization dedicated to the prevention of osteoporosis and broken bones, the promotion of strong bones for life and the reduction of human suffering through programs of public and clinician awareness, education, advocacy and research. Established in 1984, NOF is the nation's leading voluntary health organization solely dedicated to osteoporosis and bone health.
The 2016 theme is Love Your Bones: Protect Your Future


Love Your Bones, Protect Your Future



Osteoporosis is a major public health threat for an estimated 44 million Americans. Of the 10 million American’s estimated to already have osteoporosis, eight million are women and two million are men. 

What can you do to protect your bones?
Osteoporosis and the broken bones it can cause are not part of normal aging. Osteoporosis prevention should begin in childhood and continue throughout life.
1. Get enough calcium and vitamin D and eat a well balanced diet.
2. Engage in regular exercise.
3. Eat foods that are good for bone health, such as fruits and vegetables.
4. Avoid smoking and limit alcohol to 2-3 drinks per day.



What Women Need to Know
Females are at a higher risk of developing osteoporosis and broken bones. 
• Of the estimated 10 million Americans with osteoporosis, about eight million or 80% are women.
• Approximately one in two women over age 50 will break a bone because of osteoporosis.
• A woman's risk of breaking a hip is equal to her combined risk of breast, uterine and ovarian cancer.
There are multiple reasons why women are more like to get osteoporosis than men, including:
• Women tend to have smaller, thinner bones than men.
• Estrogen, a hormone in women decreases sharply when women reach menopause, which can cause bone loss. This is why the chance of developing osteoporosis increases as women reach menopause.

Are You at Risk for Developing Osteoporosis?

Uncontrollable Risk Factors
•           Being over age 50.
•           Being Female.
•           Menopause.
•           Family History.
•           Low Body Weight/Being Small and Thin.
•           Broken Bones or Height Loss.
Controllable Risk Factors
•           Not Getting Enough Calcium and Vitamin D.
•           Not Eating Enough Fruits and Vegetables.
•           Getting Too Much Protein, Sodium and Caffeine.
•           Having an Inactive Lifestyle.
•           Smoking.
•           Drinking too much alcohol.
•           Losing Weight.
There are also medications and diseases that can cause bone loss and increase your risk of osteoporosis.


Calcium and Vitamin D 
Getting enough calcium and vitamin D are essential to building stronger, denser bones early in life and to keeping bones strong and healthy later in life. Calcium and vitamin D are the two most important nutrients for bone health.

Calcium-Rich Food Sources 
Dairy products, such as low-fat and non-fat milk, yogurt and cheese are high in calcium. Certain green vegetables and other foods contain calcium in smaller amounts. Some juices, breakfast foods, soymilk, cereals, snacks, and breads have calcium that has been added. 

Vitamin D Sources
There are three ways to get vitamin D:
• Sunlight 
• Food 
• Supplements 

Three Steps to Unbreakable Bones


You’re never too young or too old to improve the health of your bones. Osteoporosis prevention should begin in childhood. But it shouldn't stop there. Whatever your age, the habits you adopt now can affect your bone health for the rest of your life. Now is the time to take action.

Resources and References. To learn more about Osteoporosis, please visit the following Foundations.
World Osteoporosis Day
International Osteoporosis Foundation 




Nutrition.gov News

Dietitian Blog List