Saturday, April 30, 2016

April 30, Mr. Potato Head Celebrates his Birthday
with an Important Health Message


Mr. Potato Head is a beloved American toy, who has been around for over 60 years. He has gone through many changes, but over the last few years, he has become involved in physical fitness and healthy eating. In this birthday video, Mr. and Mrs. Potato Head share their admiration for the Let’s Move and Kid’s Eat Right campaigns. They discuss cutting back on salt, butter and sour cream and increasing their physical activity.

Mr. Potato Head Celebrates his Birthday
with an Important Health Message
 

History
Mr. Potato Head was invented by George Lerner in 1949 and first manufactured and distributed by Hasbro in 1952. Mr. Potato Head made his debut on April 30, 1952 as the first toy advertised directly to children on television. Before this, all toy advertising was directed to parents. This commercial revolutionized marketing. Over one million kits were sold in the first year.

In 1952, the original Mr. Potato Head kit provided separate plastic parts to be stuck into a real potato or other vegetables. By 1964, due to government regulations, Hasbro was forced to include a plastic potato "body" in its kits. This change was due to choking hazards and sharp pieces.
          Special Appearances
                 and Awards

1987. Mr. Potato Head gives up his pipe to Surgeon General C. Everett Koop in Washington, D.C. and became the "Spokesspud" for the American Cancer Society's annual "Great American Smokeout" campaign. 

May 1, 1992. Mr. Potato Head turns 40 years old and receives the President's Council for Physical Fitness award at the third annual Great American Workout.

1995. Mr. Potato Head made his Hollywood debut with a leading role in the Disney/Pixar movie, Toy Story.

1996. Mr. and Mrs. Potato Head joined the League of Women Voters and their "Get out the Vote" campaign.

1997 Mr. Potato Head became the "spokesspud" for Burger King’s new French fries campaign.


1999. Mr. and Mrs. Potato Head starred in Toy Story 2.


March 24, 2000. Mr. Potato Head is inducted into the Toy Hall of Fame.


February 12, 2002. Mr. Potato Head rang the opening bell at the New York Stock Exchange.


2002. On his 50th birthday, Mr. Potato Head is awarded his own official AARP card.


2002. The Rhode Island Legislature gave approval to feature Mr. Potato Head on a state auto license plate in order to raise money for charity.


2005. Mr. Potato Head became the national “spokesspud” for the United States Potato Board.


2010. Mr. Potato Head appeared in Toy Story 3.


2011 Hasbro unveils a new, noticeably thinner Mr. Potato Head at the 2011 International Toy Fair convention in New York City.

Vintage Mr. and Mrs. Potato Head Commercial
 

Toy Story 2 Bloopers with
Mr. and Mrs. Potato Head



Resources.
Hasbro, Inc. is a branded play company providing children and families around the world with a wide-range of toys, games and other family entertainment. Hasbro is the manufacturer of Mr. and Mrs. Potato Head. Hasbro has a long tradition of supporting children worldwide through a variety of philanthropic programs.  Their mission is to assist children in triumphing over their life obstacles and to bring the joy of play into their lives.  Visit Hasbro Community Relations to learn about the many programs Hasbro supports.

April 30, National Raisin Day


Raisins are dried grapes. They are fat and cholesterol free; gluten free; naturally low in sodium; a good source of dietary fiber, potassium, and antioxidants.

Raisins contain the phytochemicals, resveratrol and anthocyanin. Studies suggest resveratrol may provide protection against certain cancers, coronary heart disease, and infections. Anthocyanins may reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke; reverse the short-term memory loss associated with aging; reduce the risk of several types of cancer; help control high blood pressure; and help boost the immune system.

Serving Ideas
Eat them plain as a snack or add raisins to
·   Breakfast cereal
·   Yogurt or Ice Cream
·   Baked goods
·   Stuffing, Rice, Pasta
·   Salads
·   Trail Mix

Raisins and Sulfites
Commercially grown dried raisins are often treated with sulfur dioxide during processing in order to extend their shelf life. The sulfites used may cause adverse reactions in people who suffer from asthma.

Federal regulations prohibit the use of sulfites in foods classified as "organic."

Warning.
Raisins can cause renal failure in dogs. The cause is unknown.




1986 - The California Raisins



Growing and Harvesting Raisins

Resources
Fruits and Veggies More Matters: Raisins



Monday, April 25, 2016

April 25-29: Every Kid Healthy™ Week

Action for Healthy Kids® fights childhood obesity, undernourishment and physical inactivity by helping schools become healthier places so kids can live healthier lives. They partner with a legion of dedicated volunteers -- teachers, students, moms, dads, school wellness experts and more - from within the ranks of our 100,000+ network to create healthful school changes. After all, everyone has a part to play in ending the nation’s childhood obesity epidemic.


Action for Healthy Kids® efforts are supported by a collaboration of more than 75 organizations, corporations and government agencies. Working together, we’re giving kids the keys to health and academic success by meeting them where they are -- in the classroom, in the cafeteria and on the playground -- with fun physical activity and nutrition lessons and changes that make it possible for them to eat nutritiously and play actively every day.

The mission of  Every Kid Healthy™ Week is to mobilize school professionals, families and communities to take actions that lead to healthy eating, physical activity and healthier schools where kids thrive.

Action for Healthy Kids' 2013-2016 strategic goal is to direct all efforts towards ensuring all U.S. schools provide healthy foods, quality health and physical education, and comprehensive physical activity for all students by 2030. They are making healthy kids a national priority by developing effective plans to implement district wellness policies, health programs and practices, and school-family-community partnerships. These three components will work together to drive transformative change in health policies, systems and environments. By taking greater action today, we can prevent our children from becoming obese adults counted among the millions with preventable chronic diseases. 


History

Created in 2002 in response to 16th U.S. Surgeon General David Satcher’s public call to action, Action for Healthy Kids works with schools to fight the national epidemic of childhood obesity and poor health.

Since its founding, Action for Healthy Kids and its 75+ partner organizations have turned the spotlight on the childhood obesity crisis so it’s now widely acknowledged as a top priority by health and public health professionals, government leaders, school systems and the popular media -- galvanizing invaluable support from a wide range of constituencies.

Today, Action for Healthy Kids is a leader in this national movement to improve child health, working at the federal and state levels and in school districts and school buildings nationwide.


Lights, Camera, Breakfast Video Contest 2nd-place winner


Commitment to Change

Commitment to Change provides parents, educators, school administrators and school health volunteers with a blueprint to transform schools into healthier environments for kids by:
* Ensuring that every school is guided by a regularly updated wellness policy
* Providing all students, from pre-kindergarten through 12th grade, with culturally-sensitive physical activity and healthy eating educational programs
* Ensuring children and adolescents get at least 60 minutes of physical activity daily
* Making sur
e that all school foods meet the nutrition standards promoted in Dietary Guidelines for Americans

Accomplishments
* During the 2013–2014 school year Action for Healthy Kids worked hard to bring physical activity and nutrition lessons, programs and grants to more than 29,000 schools and their 12.8 million students.

*Our ranks of volunteers have grown from fewer than 700 in 2002 to more than 80,000 (and still growing) in 2014.

*We have a powerful partner network of more than 75 national organizations and associations representing leaders in health, education, nutrition, fitness, business, government agencies and other organizations that serve and care about youth.

*We continue to develop and refine a portfolio of programs and services to meet the growing need. These range from school nutrition and physical activity programs to expert coaching on how to develop, implement and evaluate a school wellness policy or action plan.

Sunday, April 24, 2016

Edible Flowers by Guest Blogger: Brittaney Bialas, MS, RD


Spring is a warm, bright, and sunny time of year when you may schedule time for outdoor picnics at local parks and beaches. While you are at it, you might as well pencil in some time to brighten up your herb or vegetable garden with some tasty flowers – edible flowers, that is! 

You may have seen floral garnishes adorning fancy meals or flashy desserts; but you may not know that you can eat many of these flowers fresh from the plant after rinsing. Edible flowers can be cooked like a vegetable, sprinkled on top of a favorite dish, used to make soups and sauces, or stuffed and sautéed as a main part of a recipe. They can be made into vinegar, syrups, butters, and jellies, or used in custards, sorbets, and other desserts. They can also be frozen into ice cubes to add extra excitement to an otherwise boring beverage on a hot day. Now is the time of year when many edible flowers are in peak bloom. They may even be in your garden already - just waiting to be added to your next dish!




Some of the edible flowers that may be in your backyard or vases include pansies, violas, chrysanthemums, carnations, fuchsias, geraniums, jasmine, lavender, violets, and certain roses. Flavors range from sweet and honey-like to spicy and peppery, while scents can add a floral aroma or a citrusy tang. Nasturtiums are a popular edible flower that adds a spicy, peppery kick. The purple flowers of banana trees and blossoms of citrus trees (lemon, lime, orange, grapefruit, kumquat) are edible fruit flowers that may be in your back yard. Many herb flowers, including alliums (garlic, chives, leeks), cilantro/coriander, chicory, dill, mint, sage, and thyme are also safe to eat. Most of the flavors of herbal flowers resemble those of the herbs they come from. These can be added to a dish along with or in place of the herb itself. Several vegetable flowers probably already make a regular appearance in your diet, such as cauliflower (who would have thought?), broccoli, and artichoke, which are all flower blossoms. In addition, the flowers of arugula, okra, radishes, peas, and squash are edible. Squash blossoms appear quite often in the produce stands and taste a bit like the raw gourd from which it came.

Best of all, many edible flowers have vitamin C, vitamin A, and other beneficial essential nutrients. Edible flowers can replace sodium and sugar when used in conjunction with herbs and spices, adding more flavor and aroma to foods. However, keep in mind that edible flowers have a delicate taste that is detected best when added to simple dishes that do not have overpowering flavors.




Many flowers can be safely tossed onto our plates; but there are flowers that are poisonous and should never be eaten. Always make sure a flower is edible before adding it to your food. Some resources that list some edible flowers are at Colorado State Extension  and North Carolina State University. In general, edible flowers are best when they are picked during the morning when they have the most moisture. They can be rinsed and placed in a moist paper towel in the refrigerator for storage. Use within a short period to maintain quality.

There are also some safety rules to follow regarding where you find your edible flowers. Do not pick flowers from the side of the road where fumes from vehicles and other contaminants can make the plants unsafe to eat. Do not purchase edible flowers from nurseries or garden centers unless they are grown specifically for consumption. Do consume edible flowers that you have grown from seeds as long as you do not use pesticides or other chemicals. Do introduce small amounts of new flowers one at a time since pollen from the plants may trigger allergies. Do research which parts should and should not be used since each type of edible flower is different.

Flowers are nice to have. Their colors brighten a room, they give off a pleasing aroma, and they bring joy to people who take the time to notice them.

However, one of the most exciting reasons for dietitians to love flowers is that they may be food! Spring is the perfect time to try something new and let an edible flower be a part of your dining room table – and not just as an accent piece in a vase! 


Pansy Herb Salad 
4 cups mixed greens 
1/4 cup fresh sprigs of dill 
1/4 cup fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves 
4 large basil leaves, rolled up and thinly sliced crosswise 
1 large lemon, halved 
Pinch of salt 
Fresh ground black pepper to taste 
1 /2 cup toasted walnuts 
3/4 cup crumbled feta 
1 cup fresh pansy flowers 

Toss salad greens and herbs in a large bowl. Squeeze lemon juice (without the seeds) over the greens and season with salt and pepper. Toss again. Add walnuts and feta and toss well. Divide salad and pansies among four serving plates and serve.

Nutrition Fact Per Serving (Serves 4)
Calories: 179; Fat: 16g; Carbohydrate: 5g. Adapted from Pansy Herb Salad





Wednesday, April 13, 2016

April 10 - 16, 2016: National Volunteer Week
Volunteer to Stop Child Hunger in the United States

Volunteer to Stop Child Hunger in the United States

Becoming educated on child hunger in the United States is the first step towards finding a solution. The facts will surprise you. Hunger exists in every community and can affect families of any demographic. Use these resources to educate yourself and community members of all ages on where hunger strikes, how often, and what factors contribute to hunger. You can also find the food banks and action centers taking steps against hunger in your community so you can join in the fight. Together, we can do better.


In the photograph above, we used MyPlate to plan for our donation. *If foods are going to a food bank, use only shelf-stable items. A shelf-stable food requires no refrigeration.

*You may want to make a food basket for a family in your community. Knowing the food will be given to a family right away will allow you to include fresh fruits and vegetables.

Use of any specific brand of food is not an endorsement.
-Dr. Sandra Frank, 


Five Presidents on the Power of Service



What Will You Bring to the Table? 

Powered by generationOn

GenerationOn Mission: To inspire, equip, and mobilize youth to take action that changes the world and themselves through service. 

About GenerationOn: A global youth service movement igniting the power of all kids to make their mark on the world. They are the youth division of Points of Light

GenerationOn has brought the nation's leading youth service organizations and programs under one umbrella including Children for Children, The League, Learning to Give, and Kids Care Clubs, HandsOn Schools. By partnering with teachers, parents, schools, community organizations and businesses, generationOn gives kids the opportunity to see firsthand the issues in their communities and the tools and resources they need to respond and become part of the solution”. 


Points of Light
 connects people to their power to make a meaningful difference by providing access to tools, resources and opportunities to help volunteers use their time, talent, voice and money to meet the critical needs of our communities 

Resources.

Nutrition.gov News

Dietitian Blog List