Saturday, April 30, 2016

April 30, Mr. Potato Head Celebrates his Birthday
with an Important Health Message


Mr. Potato Head is a beloved American toy, who has been around for over 60 years. He has gone through many changes, but over the last few years, he has become involved in physical fitness and healthy eating. In this birthday video, Mr. and Mrs. Potato Head share their admiration for the Let’s Move and Kid’s Eat Right campaigns. They discuss cutting back on salt, butter and sour cream and increasing their physical activity.

Mr. Potato Head Celebrates his Birthday
with an Important Health Message
 

History
Mr. Potato Head was invented by George Lerner in 1949 and first manufactured and distributed by Hasbro in 1952. Mr. Potato Head made his debut on April 30, 1952 as the first toy advertised directly to children on television. Before this, all toy advertising was directed to parents. This commercial revolutionized marketing. Over one million kits were sold in the first year.

In 1952, the original Mr. Potato Head kit provided separate plastic parts to be stuck into a real potato or other vegetables. By 1964, due to government regulations, Hasbro was forced to include a plastic potato "body" in its kits. This change was due to choking hazards and sharp pieces.
          Special Appearances
                 and Awards

1987. Mr. Potato Head gives up his pipe to Surgeon General C. Everett Koop in Washington, D.C. and became the "Spokesspud" for the American Cancer Society's annual "Great American Smokeout" campaign. 

May 1, 1992. Mr. Potato Head turns 40 years old and receives the President's Council for Physical Fitness award at the third annual Great American Workout.

1995. Mr. Potato Head made his Hollywood debut with a leading role in the Disney/Pixar movie, Toy Story.

1996. Mr. and Mrs. Potato Head joined the League of Women Voters and their "Get out the Vote" campaign.

1997 Mr. Potato Head became the "spokesspud" for Burger King’s new French fries campaign.


1999. Mr. and Mrs. Potato Head starred in Toy Story 2.


March 24, 2000. Mr. Potato Head is inducted into the Toy Hall of Fame.


February 12, 2002. Mr. Potato Head rang the opening bell at the New York Stock Exchange.


2002. On his 50th birthday, Mr. Potato Head is awarded his own official AARP card.


2002. The Rhode Island Legislature gave approval to feature Mr. Potato Head on a state auto license plate in order to raise money for charity.


2005. Mr. Potato Head became the national “spokesspud” for the United States Potato Board.


2010. Mr. Potato Head appeared in Toy Story 3.


2011 Hasbro unveils a new, noticeably thinner Mr. Potato Head at the 2011 International Toy Fair convention in New York City.

Vintage Mr. and Mrs. Potato Head Commercial
 

Toy Story 2 Bloopers with
Mr. and Mrs. Potato Head



Resources.
Hasbro, Inc. is a branded play company providing children and families around the world with a wide-range of toys, games and other family entertainment. Hasbro is the manufacturer of Mr. and Mrs. Potato Head. Hasbro has a long tradition of supporting children worldwide through a variety of philanthropic programs.  Their mission is to assist children in triumphing over their life obstacles and to bring the joy of play into their lives.  Visit Hasbro Community Relations to learn about the many programs Hasbro supports.

April 30, National Raisin Day


Raisins are dried grapes. They are fat and cholesterol free; gluten free; naturally low in sodium; a good source of dietary fiber, potassium, and antioxidants.

Raisins contain the phytochemicals, resveratrol and anthocyanin. Studies suggest resveratrol may provide protection against certain cancers, coronary heart disease, and infections. Anthocyanins may reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke; reverse the short-term memory loss associated with aging; reduce the risk of several types of cancer; help control high blood pressure; and help boost the immune system.

Serving Ideas
Eat them plain as a snack or add raisins to
·   Breakfast cereal
·   Yogurt or Ice Cream
·   Baked goods
·   Stuffing, Rice, Pasta
·   Salads
·   Trail Mix

Raisins and Sulfites
Commercially grown dried raisins are often treated with sulfur dioxide during processing in order to extend their shelf life. The sulfites used may cause adverse reactions in people who suffer from asthma.

Federal regulations prohibit the use of sulfites in foods classified as "organic."

Warning.
Raisins can cause renal failure in dogs. The cause is unknown.




1986 - The California Raisins



Growing and Harvesting Raisins

Resources
Fruits and Veggies More Matters: Raisins



Friday, April 29, 2016

April 29, 2016 - National Arbor Day

"Arbor Day is a time to celebrate the wonders of nature, and to plan for an even greener future by planting and caring for trees."

Our Fruit Trees

John Denver - Plant a Tree

While growing up in East Meadow, New York, we had a huge apple tree in our yard. I would climb up the tree and sit on the branches for hours. I loved eating the apples while watching the world below.

When Jake and I moved into our home in 1998 we planted a mango tree. We watched it grow and flourish. Then in 2005, Hurricane Wilma hit and damaged the tree. For years we tried to nurse the tree back to health, but the infection had spread into the roots.

Finally on April 25, 2012, we had the old tree removed; and we replanted a new Valencia pride mango tree.

Planting a fruit tree is good for the environment, economical, and marks  special moments in one’s life.


Visit the Arbor Day Foundation. Resources, membership, free trees and a lot more.

Our Nation's Forests are National Treasures


Thursday, April 28, 2016

April 28, World Day for Safety and Health at Work



"Worldwide, occupational diseases continue to be the leading cause of work-related deaths. According to ILO estimates, out of 2.34 million occupational fatalities every year, only 321,000 are due to accidents. The remaining 2.02 million deaths are caused by various types of work-related diseases, which correspond to a daily average of more than 5,500 deaths. This is an unacceptable Decent Work deficit.

The inadequate prevention of occupational diseases has profound negative effects not only on workers and their families but also on society at large due to the tremendous costs that it generates; particularly, in terms of loss of productivity and burdening of social security systems."



On Apr 28, 1970 (signed into law in 1971) was the founding of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).


Safety in Restaurants
Slips and Falls


Foodborne Disease OSHA Standards
Control and Prevention

Control of foodborne diseases is based on avoidance of contaminated food, destruction of contaminants, and prevention of further spread of contaminants. Prevention is dependent upon proper cooking and storing practices, and personal hygiene of food handlers.

The quality of food, and controls used to prevent foodborne diseases, are primarily regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and local public health authorities. These diseases may be occupationally related if they affect the food processors (e.g., poultry processing workers), food preparers and servers (e.g., cooks, waiters), or workers who are provided food at the worksite.

Section 5(a)(1) of the OSHA Act, often referred to as the General Duty Clause, requires employers to "furnish to each of his employees employment and a place of employment which are free from recognized hazards that are causing or are likely to cause death or serious physical harm to his employees". Section 5(a)(2) requires employers to "comply with occupational safety and health standards promulgated under this Act".


National Office
U.S. Department of Labor
Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)
200 Constitution Avenue, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20210

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

National Soft Pretzel Month and April 26 National Pretzel Day

In the 20th century, soft pretzels became popular in other regions of the United States. Cities like Philadelphia, Chicago, and New York became renowned for their soft pretzels. The key to success was the introduction of the new mass production methods of the industrialized age, which increased the availability and quantity, and the opening up of multiple points of distribution at schools, convenience and grocery stores, and entertainment venues such as movie theaters, arenas, concert halls, and sport stadiums. Prior to that, street vendors used to sell pretzels on street corners in wooden glass-enclosed cases.



Pretzel Dips

Nutrition Information

Pretzel Recipe: Pizza Pretzel with
Pasta Sauce

In 2003, Pennsylvania Governor, Ed Rendell declares April 26 National Pretzel Day to acknowledge the importance of the pretzel to the state's history and economy.

In particular, the S-shaped soft pretzel, often served with brown mustard, became iconic in Philadelphia and was established as a part of Philadelphia's cuisine for snacking at school, work, or home, and considered by most to be a quick meal. The average Philadelphian today consumes about twelve times as many pretzels as the national average.

Pennsylvania today is the center of American pretzel production for both the hard-crispy and the soft-bread types of pretzels. Southeastern Pennsylvania, with its large population of German background, is considered the birthplace of the American pretzel industry, and many pretzel bakers are still located in the area. Pennsylvania produces 80% of the nation's pretzels.

The annual United States pretzel industry is worth over $550 million. The average American consumes about 1.5 pounds (0.7 kg) of pretzels per year.

The privately run "Pretzel Museum" opened in Philadelphia in 1993. In 2003, Pennsylvania Governor Ed Rendell declared April 26 "National Pretzel Day" to acknowledge the importance of the pretzel to the state's history and economy. Philly Pretzel Factory stores offer a free pretzel to each customer on this day.





Resources
1, Pretzel, From Wikipedia
2. Soft Pretzels, Pinterest

Monday, April 25, 2016

April 25-29: Every Kid Healthy™ Week

Action for Healthy Kids® fights childhood obesity, undernourishment and physical inactivity by helping schools become healthier places so kids can live healthier lives. They partner with a legion of dedicated volunteers -- teachers, students, moms, dads, school wellness experts and more - from within the ranks of our 100,000+ network to create healthful school changes. After all, everyone has a part to play in ending the nation’s childhood obesity epidemic.


Action for Healthy Kids® efforts are supported by a collaboration of more than 75 organizations, corporations and government agencies. Working together, we’re giving kids the keys to health and academic success by meeting them where they are -- in the classroom, in the cafeteria and on the playground -- with fun physical activity and nutrition lessons and changes that make it possible for them to eat nutritiously and play actively every day.

The mission of  Every Kid Healthy™ Week is to mobilize school professionals, families and communities to take actions that lead to healthy eating, physical activity and healthier schools where kids thrive.

Action for Healthy Kids' 2013-2016 strategic goal is to direct all efforts towards ensuring all U.S. schools provide healthy foods, quality health and physical education, and comprehensive physical activity for all students by 2030. They are making healthy kids a national priority by developing effective plans to implement district wellness policies, health programs and practices, and school-family-community partnerships. These three components will work together to drive transformative change in health policies, systems and environments. By taking greater action today, we can prevent our children from becoming obese adults counted among the millions with preventable chronic diseases. 


History

Created in 2002 in response to 16th U.S. Surgeon General David Satcher’s public call to action, Action for Healthy Kids works with schools to fight the national epidemic of childhood obesity and poor health.

Since its founding, Action for Healthy Kids and its 75+ partner organizations have turned the spotlight on the childhood obesity crisis so it’s now widely acknowledged as a top priority by health and public health professionals, government leaders, school systems and the popular media -- galvanizing invaluable support from a wide range of constituencies.

Today, Action for Healthy Kids is a leader in this national movement to improve child health, working at the federal and state levels and in school districts and school buildings nationwide.


Lights, Camera, Breakfast Video Contest 2nd-place winner


Commitment to Change

Commitment to Change provides parents, educators, school administrators and school health volunteers with a blueprint to transform schools into healthier environments for kids by:
* Ensuring that every school is guided by a regularly updated wellness policy
* Providing all students, from pre-kindergarten through 12th grade, with culturally-sensitive physical activity and healthy eating educational programs
* Ensuring children and adolescents get at least 60 minutes of physical activity daily
* Making sur
e that all school foods meet the nutrition standards promoted in Dietary Guidelines for Americans

Accomplishments
* During the 2013–2014 school year Action for Healthy Kids worked hard to bring physical activity and nutrition lessons, programs and grants to more than 29,000 schools and their 12.8 million students.

*Our ranks of volunteers have grown from fewer than 700 in 2002 to more than 80,000 (and still growing) in 2014.

*We have a powerful partner network of more than 75 national organizations and associations representing leaders in health, education, nutrition, fitness, business, government agencies and other organizations that serve and care about youth.

*We continue to develop and refine a portfolio of programs and services to meet the growing need. These range from school nutrition and physical activity programs to expert coaching on how to develop, implement and evaluate a school wellness policy or action plan.

Sunday, April 24, 2016

Edible Flowers by Guest Blogger: Brittaney Bialas, MS, RD


Spring is a warm, bright, and sunny time of year when you may schedule time for outdoor picnics at local parks and beaches. While you are at it, you might as well pencil in some time to brighten up your herb or vegetable garden with some tasty flowers – edible flowers, that is! 

You may have seen floral garnishes adorning fancy meals or flashy desserts; but you may not know that you can eat many of these flowers fresh from the plant after rinsing. Edible flowers can be cooked like a vegetable, sprinkled on top of a favorite dish, used to make soups and sauces, or stuffed and sautéed as a main part of a recipe. They can be made into vinegar, syrups, butters, and jellies, or used in custards, sorbets, and other desserts. They can also be frozen into ice cubes to add extra excitement to an otherwise boring beverage on a hot day. Now is the time of year when many edible flowers are in peak bloom. They may even be in your garden already - just waiting to be added to your next dish!




Some of the edible flowers that may be in your backyard or vases include pansies, violas, chrysanthemums, carnations, fuchsias, geraniums, jasmine, lavender, violets, and certain roses. Flavors range from sweet and honey-like to spicy and peppery, while scents can add a floral aroma or a citrusy tang. Nasturtiums are a popular edible flower that adds a spicy, peppery kick. The purple flowers of banana trees and blossoms of citrus trees (lemon, lime, orange, grapefruit, kumquat) are edible fruit flowers that may be in your back yard. Many herb flowers, including alliums (garlic, chives, leeks), cilantro/coriander, chicory, dill, mint, sage, and thyme are also safe to eat. Most of the flavors of herbal flowers resemble those of the herbs they come from. These can be added to a dish along with or in place of the herb itself. Several vegetable flowers probably already make a regular appearance in your diet, such as cauliflower (who would have thought?), broccoli, and artichoke, which are all flower blossoms. In addition, the flowers of arugula, okra, radishes, peas, and squash are edible. Squash blossoms appear quite often in the produce stands and taste a bit like the raw gourd from which it came.

Best of all, many edible flowers have vitamin C, vitamin A, and other beneficial essential nutrients. Edible flowers can replace sodium and sugar when used in conjunction with herbs and spices, adding more flavor and aroma to foods. However, keep in mind that edible flowers have a delicate taste that is detected best when added to simple dishes that do not have overpowering flavors.




Many flowers can be safely tossed onto our plates; but there are flowers that are poisonous and should never be eaten. Always make sure a flower is edible before adding it to your food. Some resources that list some edible flowers are at Colorado State Extension  and North Carolina State University. In general, edible flowers are best when they are picked during the morning when they have the most moisture. They can be rinsed and placed in a moist paper towel in the refrigerator for storage. Use within a short period to maintain quality.

There are also some safety rules to follow regarding where you find your edible flowers. Do not pick flowers from the side of the road where fumes from vehicles and other contaminants can make the plants unsafe to eat. Do not purchase edible flowers from nurseries or garden centers unless they are grown specifically for consumption. Do consume edible flowers that you have grown from seeds as long as you do not use pesticides or other chemicals. Do introduce small amounts of new flowers one at a time since pollen from the plants may trigger allergies. Do research which parts should and should not be used since each type of edible flower is different.

Flowers are nice to have. Their colors brighten a room, they give off a pleasing aroma, and they bring joy to people who take the time to notice them.

However, one of the most exciting reasons for dietitians to love flowers is that they may be food! Spring is the perfect time to try something new and let an edible flower be a part of your dining room table – and not just as an accent piece in a vase! 


Pansy Herb Salad 
4 cups mixed greens 
1/4 cup fresh sprigs of dill 
1/4 cup fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves 
4 large basil leaves, rolled up and thinly sliced crosswise 
1 large lemon, halved 
Pinch of salt 
Fresh ground black pepper to taste 
1 /2 cup toasted walnuts 
3/4 cup crumbled feta 
1 cup fresh pansy flowers 

Toss salad greens and herbs in a large bowl. Squeeze lemon juice (without the seeds) over the greens and season with salt and pepper. Toss again. Add walnuts and feta and toss well. Divide salad and pansies among four serving plates and serve.

Nutrition Fact Per Serving (Serves 4)
Calories: 179; Fat: 16g; Carbohydrate: 5g. Adapted from Pansy Herb Salad





Saturday, April 23, 2016

April 23, National Picnic Day - Food Safety


Picnicking the Smart Way,
Dr. Brian Wansink (USDA)


Before you begin setting out your picnic feast, make sure hands and surfaces are clean.

Place cold food in a cooler with ice or frozen gel packs. Cold food should be stored at 40°F or below to prevent bacterial growth. Meat, poultry, and seafood should be packed while still frozen so that they stay colder longer.

Pack beverages in one cooler and perishable foods in another. This will prevent the perishable foods from being exposed to warm outdoor temperatures.

Limit the number of times the cooler is opened so as to keep the contents cold longer.

Be sure to keep raw meat, poultry, and seafood securely wrapped. This keeps their juices from contaminating prepared and cooked foods or foods that will be eaten raw, such as fruits and vegetables.

Rinse fresh fruits and vegetables under running tap water before packing them in the cooler.


For more food safety tips, visit 


http://homefoodsafety.org





Friday, April 22, 2016

Foods Symbolic of the Passover Seder




Shalom Sesame
Khalikidan's Passover Seder
Khalikidan and her family came to Israel from Ethiopia. 
Join her family for a Passover Seder, and 
share Khalikidan's excitement in reciting the four questions.


The Symbols of the Passover Seder
 

Passover is a holiday rich in symbols retelling the story of the Jewish people's exodus from Egypt. The seder is a ceremonial dinner observed on the first night of Passover, and in many homes on the second night as well. The seder table is set with a seder plate, salt water, matzo, kosher wine, Cup of Elijah, Miriam's Cup, and a copy of the Haggadah for each guest.

Matzo
Matzo is an unleavened bread made solely from flour and water and is not allowed to rise. Matzo symbolizes freedom. As the Jewish people fled Egypt there was no time to wait for the bread to rise. A plate of three whole matzahs are stacked and separated from each other by cloths or napkins. The middle matzo is broken in half and put aside for the afikoman.

The afikoman is eaten as a dessert. The person leading the seder will hide the afikoman and ask all the children to find it. Children will receive toys or other gifts as a reward for returning the afikoman.

The top and other half of the middle matzo is used for the hamotzi (blessing over bread), and the bottom matzo is used for the korech (Hillel sandwich).
Haggadah.
The book containing the story of the Exodus and the ritual of the Seder. It is read at the Passover Seder.

Many of the symbols are displayed on the seder plate, which is the centerpiece of the seder table.
 
Karpas (Vegetable). This part of the seder plate dates back to a first and second century tradition in Jerusalem. At the beginning of the seder a vegetable, usually lettuce, radish or parsley is dipped in salt water and eaten. It is said the salt water represents the tears our ancestors shed during their years of enslavement.

Z'roa (Shank bone). The roasted shank bone of a lamb reminds us of when the Jewish people marked the doorposts of their homes with the blood of a lamb as a signal that death should pass over them. The shank bone also reminds us of the sacrificial lamb killed and eaten during the days when the Temple stood. In modern times, some Jewish families will use a poultry neck instead. Vegetarians will often replace the shank bone with a roasted beet, which has the color of blood and is shaped like a bone, but is not derived from an animal.


Baytzah (Hard Boiled Egg). There are two interpretations of the symbolism of the hard boiled egg. One is an ancient fertility symbol. The other is a symbol of mourning for the loss of the two Temples, the first of which was destroyed by the Babylonians in 586 B.C.E. and the second of which was destroyed by the Romans in 70 C.E. Hard boiled eggs were traditionally the food of mourners and became symbolic for the loss of these sacred sites.

Charoset. A mixture of chopped apples, nuts, wine and spices representing the mortar the Jewish slaves used to build structures for the Egyptian Pharaoh.

Maror (Bitter Herbs) reminds us of the slavery the Jewish people endured in Egypt. Horseradish, either the root or a prepared paste is often used.

Hazeret
(Bitter Vegetable) also symbolizes the bitterness of slavery. Romaine lettuce is usually used. When hazeret is not represented on the seder plate some families will put a small bowl of salt water in its place.

Elijah's cup is placed at the center of the table. After the seder meal there is a custom to pour a cup of wine, the "Cup of Elijah," and open the front door of the home. According to tradition, at this moment our homes are graced by the presence of Elijah the Prophet.

Miriam's Cup is a new ritual object that is placed on the seder table beside the Cup of Elijah. Miriam's Cup is filled with water close to the beginning of the seder. It serves as a symbol of Miriam's Well, which was the source of water for the jewish people in the desert. Putting a Miriam's Cup on your table is a way of making your seder more inclusive. It lets people know that the words of girls and boys, women and men, are welcome. It is also a way of drawing attention to the importance of Miriam and the other women of the Exodus story - women who have sometimes been overlooked. It is said, "If it wasn't for the righteousness of women of that generation we would not have been redeemed from Egypt"

To our Family and Friends, we wish you a Happy Passover.

April 22, Earth Day
Small Changes make a Big Difference


April 22, 1970 was the first Earth Day and it awakened almost 20 million Americans from all walks of life to launch the modern environmental movement. From that first earth day came the passage of the landmark Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, Endangered Species Act and many other environmental laws. Today the Earth Day Network (EDN) works with over 22,000 partners in 192 countries to broaden diversify and mobilize the environmental movement. More than 1 billion people now participate in Earth Day activities each year, making it the largest civic observance in the world.

A Billion Acts of Green®
A Billion Acts of Green® – the largest environmental service campaign in the world – inspires and rewards simple individual acts and larger organizational initiatives that further the goal of measurably reducing carbon emissions and supporting sustainability. 


Earth - Small Changes make a Big Difference

YouTube has a wide range of resources, from the young, older, news, family, scientist, schools, communities, governments and industry describing how they are making a difference and how we can make a difference in saving our Earth.

Mobilize The Earth


Green Mom

Cost of Food
Americans have been spending less and less on what we eat. But those savings come with a high cost: obesity, diabetes, and big health care bills. Here's a look at how our diet has changed over the last 50 years, and what we can do to make it better.


Recycle Guys


Thursday, April 21, 2016

April, National Garden Month
a Tribute to the Cooperative Extension

The ground has thawed from the winter, at least in most areas. Many people are deciding if they want to start a garden or what crops will they be planting this year.

Gardening is a passion of mine. I initially started my studies in agronomy and later changed to nutrition. The cooperative extension became an important part of my education and a wonderful resource. It was also the first job I had as a dietitian, teaching nutrition in a summer program through Cornell University Extension.



What is the Cooperative Extension?
The Cooperative Extension, also known as the Extension Service of the United States Department of Agriculture, is a research based educational program designed to help people in the areas of agriculture and food, home and family, the environment, community economic development, and youth and 4-H. The service is provided in every state's designated land-grant universities. 

NIFA is the federal partner in the Cooperative Extension System. It provides federal funding to the system and, through program leadership, helps the system identify and address current issues and problems.

History 

The Morrill Act of 1862 established land-grant universities to educate citizens in agriculture, home economics, mechanical arts, and other practical professions. Extension was formalized in 1914, with the Smith-Lever Act. It established the partnership between the agricultural colleges and the USDA to provide for cooperative agricultural extension work. 


Over the last century, the extension has adapted to changing times, and it continues to address a wide range of human, plant, and animal needs in both urban and rural areas. The cooperative extension focuses education in six major areas: 


1. 4-H Youth Development 

2. Agriculture
3. Leadership Development

4. Natural Resources
5. Family and Consumer Sciences

6. Community and Economic Development

Below are educational videos prepared by various Cooperative Extensions across the United States.

How to Grow Blueberries
North Carolina Cooperative Extension


Caring for Asparagus
University of Maine Cooperative Extension

Eat Smart New York! - 
Cornell Cooperative Extension Westchester County


Color Yourself Healthy
University of Nebraska


Florida Statewide Extension Sustainability Programs


Resources
1. To find your nearest Cooperative Extension office.
2.  
National Gardening Association
3.  
Food Gardening Guide








Wednesday, April 20, 2016

April 20, Lima Bean Respect Day


Lima beans are fresh in summer, though they are most commonly found dried, canned or frozen, all year long. Lima beans are also known as "Butter Beans"  in many parts of the United States.

There are warnings to avoid raw lima beans because they contain linamarin (also called cyanogens), which releases a cyanide compound when the seed coat is opened," according to Fruits and Veggies Matter. Linamarin is deactivated during cooking.

Nutrition Information

Modified Recipes
Lima Bean Burgers

Serves 4
Ingredients
1 (16 ounce) can lima beans, drained and rinsed
1/2 green bell pepper, cut into 2 inch pieces
1/2 onion, cut into wedges
1 clove garlic, peeled
1 egg or 2 egg whites
1 tablespoon chili powder
1 tablespoon cumin
1/2 cup bread crumbs

Directions
1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F and spray baking sheet with a non-stick cooking spray. 
2. In a medium bowl, mash lima beans with a fork until thick and pasty. Finely chop bell pepper, 
onion and garlic and stir into mashed beans.
3. In a small bowl, stir together egg whites, chili powder, and cumin. Stir the egg mixture into the 
mashed beans. Mix in bread crumbs until the mixture is sticky and holds together. 
4. Divide mixture into four patties. 
5. Place patties on baking sheet, and bake about 10 minutes on each side.
6. Serve on a whole wheat hamburger bun with kale, onion, tomato slices, and avocado.

Nutrition Facts: 255 Calories; 12g Protein; 44g Carbohydrates; 9g Dietary Fiber; 6g Total Sugars; 5g Fat; 0mg Cholesterol; 28mcg Folate; 4mg  Iron; 358mg Sodium

with Mint Vinaigrette (original recipe) from Emeril Lagasse, 
"Farm to Fork: Cooking Local, Eating Fresh"

The recipe needed very little modification, but with a few changes we were able to lower the calories, fat, sodium and sugar content. Excellent source of fiber, vitamin A, vitamin C and Folate and a good source of iron and calcium.

The Delaware Department of Agriculture
presents a Food for Thought 
video on Lima Beans.

Lima Beans: Educational Resources

Butter Beans and Lima Beans (PDF)
University of Florida. Sarasota County Extension.
Explores the difference between butter beans and lima beans.
Also provides nutritional information and recipes.

Kentucky Lima Beans (PDF)
Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service.
Information about selection, storage, preparation and a recipe.

Dietitian Blog List